William Plaise b. 1571

William Plaise 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

William was born in 1571 in England. On July 19 1596 he married his first wife Margerie Smith at St. Botolphs church. The church was first built in the 1100s then rebuilt in the 1500s and again in the 1700s. It’s still there in London.

Snapshot of the parish record of their marriage, “July Anno 1596. William Plasse and Margerie Smith weare married the 19 day in Anno Domino” [?]. William and Margerie are last on this snapshot of a 2 page document image.

Plaise, William and Margerie Smith 1596 marriage

William and Margerie 1596 marriage

William was a widow in 1618 and married Phebe Manning, also a widow. In 1637 William and family sailed to America and settled in Salem, also known as Naumkeag. William was a gunsmith in London and also in Salem where his skills were highly valued in the new colony. When he requested 10 acres of land, he received it in May, 1637. “ Willm Plaise requested a ten acre lott and it is granted’.

William was 66 when he came to America, he lived 10 more years and stayed in Salem. He shared his gunsmith skills and tools with his son, Richard Waters 2nd wife Phebe’s son. In William’s estate papers an inventory included: one feather bed, two feather bolsters, one great Bible, one psalme book, one chest, ‘tools that Richard Walters [Waters] hath’. William died in 1646 his burial place is unknown.

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Sarah Cable b. 1854

Sarah Cable 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Sarah Cable was born December 1854 near Dane, Wisconsin to Jonathan and Charlotte Knapp Cable. She had three brothers, Chancey, John, William and a sister Violetta. The Cable family moved from Wisconsin to Pleasant Grove, Iowa by 1865 when Sarah’s dad Jonathan paid taxes on a melodeon. If they had a melodeon in their home (not common in 1865) they probably had lots of music and dances. The melodeon could have been a ‘rocking’ or a parlor type.

Cable, Sarah 1876 marriage

Sarah married Horace Towslee July 29, 1876 in Floyd County. Horace and Sarah had one daughter, Ethel. In 1880 they were in Wisconsin with John and Chancey Cable in a boarding house where the men worked the railroad and Sarah ran the household. Sarah was in St Paul in 1893, a widow and dressmaker with her daughter Ethel age 5 and her sister Violetta. In 1900 Sarah lived in Chicago with her sister Violetta and her nephew Chauncey son of John Cable. Sarah was a dressmaker, Violetta a stenographer and Chauncey was 9 years old and in school. They lived at 384 Paulina St. in ‘West Town’ Chicago. Today and maybe in 1900 the ‘L’ -began in 1892- is/was right overhead.

In 1910 Sarah was in Seattle and lived with Violetta and Violetta’s husband and nephew Leonard Cable. Sarah’s brother Chancey was also in Seattle, his 1910 will papers show his siblings. Sarah was in Skagit, Washington, north of Seattle, at her death in 1912.

Sources

  • U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995, 1893 St Paul, Minnesota at Ancestry
  • Iowa County Marriages 1838-1934 at FamilySearch.org
  • Washington, Wills and Probate Records, 1851-1970 at Ancestry
  • Melodeons at Wikipedia 

Harm Henrichs b. 1877

Harm Siebelt Henrichs 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Harm was born on July 1, 1877 in Aurich, Lower Saxony, Germany. With his 8 brothers and sisters, mom Maria and dad Henrich he sailed to America and arrived in Baltimore on March 18, 1885. The US 1900 census shows the Henrichs family in Ripley Township, Butler County Iowa. Harm and his siblings Fred, Tena and Mattie are living with Henrich and Maria, the older children have started families of their own in Butler County.

The 1930 census of Jefferson Township in Butler County shows Harm, his wife Jennie and their 2 kids living on their own farm. Harms’s sisters are neighbors: William and Tena Henrichs Jacobs, Enno and Annie Henrichs Frerichs, John and Marie Henrichs Stoppelmoor, Harry and Flora Henrichs Endleman. Harm’s bothers John and Fred lived close by in Ripley and West Point townships. They all lived on farms. They built houses, barns, shelters for their livestock, chicken houses; cleared and laid out crop fields.

Ebenezer Lutheran Church Butler Center, Iowa

They also built a church: Ebenezer Lutheran Church, no longer around. The photo is from the book Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002. Harm is 4th from left. Left to right: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann- brother in law, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs -brother in law and grandpa of Stanley Roose, dad of Mary Frerichs Roose. Stopping work to snap a photo probably took a lot of convincing on the photographer’s part. The photo doesn’t have a date, it’s probably around 1905

The 1940 census shows Harm is still farming, age 62, with Jennie. Their daughter Anna is 2 farms away, married to Addo Janssen with one son Robert. Their son Henry is in Jefferson Township, married to Delma DeBower.

Sources

  • Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002, page 152. A Building Project with text: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs. Author’s permission to post photo. More on this book.
  • US Census 1900, 1930, 1940 at Ancestry and FamilySearch
  • Maryland Baltimore passenger lists index 1820-1897 at FamilySearch

Joan Hurst b. 1568

Joan Hurst 11th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Joan Hurst was baptized March 13, 1568 at St Mary’s Parish in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England. Her first husband was Thomas Rogers who died around 1595. Her 2nd husband was John Tilley. They married September 20,1596 in the same St Mary’s Parish. They had 5 children, Elizabeth Tilley was the youngest she was baptize in the same church as her mom. In 1620 Joan 52, John 48 and Elizabeth 13 were on the Mayflower and in America by November. Joan’s husband John was in the exploring party on December 6 noted for the first contact with American Indians. By January 1621 the exploring parties found a location to set up their colony, an abandoned Wampanoag village. The men built shelters, with each man responsible for his own family, ‘by that course men would make more haste than working in common’. In February this group had homes, food and water sources and supplies unpacked form the Mayflower.

Tilley, John 1620 Mayflower exploring party

1620 Mayflower exploring party

By March the number of passengers and crew, was down to 47. From Bradford’s History. “Of these hundred persons which came first over in this first ship together, the greater half died in the general mortality, and most of them in two or three months’ time.”

Joan Hurst, her husband John Tilley, John’s brother Edward Tilley and Ann, his wife, they died the first winter and were buried in Coles Hill Burial Ground. Joan and John’s daughter Elizabeth was left an orphan and eventually married another passenger John Howland. Elizabeth and John had 10 kids who all survived so today this couple has 2 million Mayflower descendants. I’m working on getting this Mayflower connection officially verified, the 400th anniversary is coming up November 2020.

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Lydia Archer b. 1601

Lydia Archer 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

This person’s name may or may not be Lydia Archer, all that is really known is that she was a wife of Francis Sprague and mom of Mercy Sprague. Francis Sprague was a Pilgrim in Plymouth colony. He sailed with Mercy Sprague and Ann Sprague in 1623. It’s proven that Mercy Sprague was his daughter. Ann Sprague could have been a daughter or could have been a wife, could have been the mom of Mercy or not. There’s nothing to show who ‘Lydia Archer’ was. 

A great source, New England marriages prior to 1700 by Clarence Torrey, has Lydia as a wife, with questions. “SPRAGUE, Francis & [?Lydia]/?Anna ____; by 1621 in Eng; Plymouth/Duxbury/Dartmouth “

The Great Migration, another solid source, shows no info on Francis’s spouse(s) and a note, ‘there are very few dates for this family and many unanswered questions’.

In the ‘cattle division’ of 1627 Francis, Anna and Mercy Sprague are listed, same 3 from the passenger list of 1623. It doesn’t seem possible that Francis was a widow caring for 2 daughters on his own, for 4 years.

Sprague family 1627

Francis, Anne and Mercy Sprague 1627 ‘cattle division’

So it’s possible Lydia died in England then Francis with 2 daughters sailed to America and married a 2nd wife in Plymouth. Or it’s possible Lydia sailed with her husband and 2 daughters, made it to Plymouth Colony and died shortly after. Then Francis married a woman, probably recently widowed, whose name was never recorded. Lydia Archer’s story is speculative, hypothetical, ’thrown together’ or made up with no proof for names, dates, relationships.

Sources

  • Volume 2 page 1425, New England marriages to 1700 database at American Ancestors
  • Volume 3 P-W, page 1725-1728, Great Migration Begins at Ancestry
  • Page 95. History of Plymouth County, Massachusetts: with biographical sketches at HathiTrust

Elizabeth Harter Bair b. 1836

Elizabeth Bair 3rd great grandma on RootsMagic

Elizabeth was born in July, 1836 in Plain Township, Stark, Ohio. She was the oldest child of George and Margaret Bowman Harter. Elizabeth’s middle name ‘Harter’ was her maternal grandmother’s maiden name. Both the Harter and Bair families were pioneers in Plain, Elizabeth’s great grandparents some of the first settlers.

Bair, Elizabeth and family 1850 census

1850 Plain Township, Ohio census, Elizabeth Bair and family

On the 1850 census Elizabeth is 13. The Bair family is on page 45 of 53. The 53 pages with 20 or fewer person on each page contain Elizabeth’s future husband’s Druckenbrod family, the Henry Miller family, future in laws of granddaughter Fianna and lots of ancestors: Miller, Bair, Harter, Druckenbrod, Malone, Kryder and Shuler families. Also in laws by marriage: Grubb, Essig, Troxel, Christ, and Bishop families. And no relation: Kissinger, Trump and Pence families too, all in this tiny township with population at 896 people in 1820 then 2277 people in 1850.

Population in Plain Township, Ohio from 1855 map

Population from 1820-1850

Elizabeth married Samuel Druckenbrod around 1854. They lived on a farm, and had 12 children. Elizabeth was 24 when the Civil War started. 320,000 Ohio men were drafted in to the war which was covered in the local newspapers: Stark County Democrat and Stark County Republican.  Elizabeth could have read Mrs. Samuel Stover’s eyewitness account of ‘the march of Lee’s rebel army into Pennsylvania; also of the retreat of the remnant of said army to the Potomac’ in the Republican and details of the battle in the Democrat.

Sources

John Speedy b. 1825

John Speedy 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree

John was the 2nd son of Thomas and Elizabeth Glenn Speedy, the older brother of Manford Speedy. John was born in 1825 in Jefferson County, Ohio. He grew up on a farm. On March 8, 1855 he married Jane Foulks, a sister of his his older brother Thomas’s wife. John and Jane farmed and had 4 kids. The 1850 US agricultural census shows John Speedy’s farm: 40 acres of improved land, 18  acres of unimproved, $1650 cash value of farm, $ 85 cash value of machinery,  2 horses, 5 cows,13 sheep, 5 pigs, $ 250 value of livestock; produced 200 bushels of wheat, 300 bushels of Indian corn,  200 bushels of oats, 158 lb. of wool, 20 lb. of Irish potatoes, 200 lb. of butter, 2 tons of hay.

In 1863 John was 38 and was drafted or signed up for the Civil War. He fought with the Ohio 157th Infantry Company K, he was a Private. The 157th Infantry reported to Columbus, Ohio for duty on May 15, 1864, one of the’ Hundred Days’ Men’. The infantry went from Columbus, Ohio to Baltimore then on to guard Fort Delaware on the Delaware River south of Philadelphia. A Major Eames wrote, “Our journey from Columbus to Baltimore was tedious but full of interest. All along the route we were saluted with cheers and smiles and waving of handkerchiefs and flags from early dawn to long after sunset. Never in all my campaigning have I seen anything to compare with those manifestations of rejoicing for the promptness of the 100 day men of Ohio”. At Fort Delaware the soldiers were guarding Confederate prisoners of war. When not on duty John probably watched ships sailing and fished. “The heavy shipping traffic on the Delaware River was a source of fascination to the farm boys from Ohio, who would sit and watch the steamers, side-wheelers, ironclads and fishing boats for hours”. Fort Delaware is where John died. He and 9 others died from disease. 

Speedy, John in 157th Ohio Infantry

John Speedy, 157th Ohio Company K

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