James Hill b. 1726

James Hill 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

James was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts on April 26, 1726. He was the youngest of 8 kids of Samuel and Ann Brown Hill. James married Eunice Walker, “James and Eunice Walker, both of Rehoboth, married by Rev. John Greenwood May 11, 1749. Int. April 13, 1749” is recorded in Vital Record of Rehoboth. James was a farmer and a blacksmith. He was a widow in 1772 and fought in the American Revolution from 1775 to 1779.

James’s first battle was on April 19, 1775 that was the day Paul Revere and others rode through the countryside warning towns and soldiers that the British Army was on the move. A Sons of the American Revolution SAR application was completed and verified in 1930 and lists the details of James’s service. Horace Hills completed this SAR application in 1930, verified as correct because of James’s Hill(s) age and location. Horace Hills lived at the same time as Philippa Mockford Speedy, they were 5th cousins.

Hills, James 1802 will with signature

Signature on 1802 will

James Hills left a will with all his children listed including Cynthia Hill Angell 3rd great grandma of Elizabeth Speedy. In 1802, the year he died, “My daughter Cynthia wife of Asa Angell …all my estate both real and personal not herein before disposed … after paying my just debts … equally divided.” Some of James’s inventory: 1 black straight woolen coat, waistcoats and breeches, hat, mittens, caps and glove, bedstead, flannel sheets, tablecloths, linen sheet, 1 sword and belt, butter mold, ladle, candle stand, bible, silver drinking cup, iron teaspoons, teapot, crockery, chairs, tables, farming tools, blacksmith tools, livestock, dwelling house, corn barn, 10 acres of land.

Sources

Annette Speedy b. 1868

Annette Speedy 2nd aunt on RootsMagic tree

Annette Constance Speedy was born in 1868 in Shell Rock, Iowa, the 4th child of Manford and first wife Ann Coates Speedy. Ann with Annettes oldest 2 siblings had died by 1869, so Annette, age 2 on the 1870 census  lived with her dad Manford, older brother Oscar, and grandpa William Speedy; her grandma Fidelia, aunts Juliet, Mary and uncle Edwin Coates. 8 people Speedys and Coates, ranging from 2 years to 80 years old in the home. By 1873 Manford married Elizabeth Stewart and they had children, three sons, three daughters. Annette, at some point moved in with Mary Jane Stewart and her husband Henry Wagonseller Royer in Bristow for a few years. Henry and Mary Jane had 4 sons. While living in Bristow Annette met then married Sherman Grove on August 1, 1889. Henry and Mary Jane were witnesses on Annette’s marriage record. The marriage was in Manford and Elizabeth Stewart Speedy’s home.

Speedy, Annette and Sherman Grove 1889 marriage

“Sherman Grove and Miss Nettie Speedy were married last Thursday at the home of the bride near Allison. The young couple are well known here, Miss Nettie having lived in WW Royer’s family for several years, Sherman having grown from boyhood to manhood here is known to be very industrious, upright young man. They have the best wishes of all who know them.”

Annette and Sherman had eight children, they named their first son Manford. During certain years the State of Iowa had to issue ‘Delayed Birth Records’ because of a mix up in record keeping and those born had to supply proof of birth and a witness. Annette’s brother Harve was a witness on these records, uncle to Annette and Sherman’s kids. In 1903 Annette and family left Bristow for Springbrook, Wisconsin, about 50 miles south of Lake Superior. They settled in Earl, Wisconsin. Then and today the  Wisconsin Great Northern Railroad runs straight through the town https://spoonertrainride.com/

Annette came back to Allison for visits and for her dad’s funeral in 1914.  In 1915 her sisters Eva and Ethel with their husbands took an auto trip to Wisconsin. Annette died September 3, 1935 the Clarksville newspaper carried her obituary. Her sisters Eva and Ethel attended the funeral. Annette and Sherman are buried in Earl Cemetery in Earl, Wisconsin.

Source, Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper
1889 Aug 8 page 5 of 8 column 4 mid way, Annette and Sherman marriage
1903 Mar 12 page column 1 mid bottom, Annette moves to Springbrook WI.
1916 Jul 20 page column 2 mid top, Eva and Ethel visit Annette
1935 Sep 19 page 5 of 8 column 6 mid way

Richard Mockford b. 1856

Richard Mockford 2nd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Richard Mockford was born September 21, 1856 in Monroe County, New York about 10 minutes south of Lake Ontario, 30 minutes or so east of Niagara Falls. He lived in the area until his 20s . At age 24 he was in Dubuque, Iowa, a mail carrier. At age 26 on March 2, 1883, he married Matilda Flood in Butler County, Iowa. He and Matilda had 2 daughters Lucy and Philippa and a son Harley who died at age 1. Richard farmed through his 50s.

Richard Mockford photo

Richard Mockford photo

February 28,1907 maybe as a birthday party for Matilda born on February 26, “Mr. and Mrs. Mockford were completely surprised Friday evening, when a party of their neighbors and friends dropped in on them in a body to spend the evening. Though surprised, they were equal to the occasion, and very gladly joined in to make the evening a most enjoyable one. After participating in games and various amusements for a time, a dainty lunch was served and when tho guests departed for their several homes, we can say on good authority that it was not a very early hour.”

In June, 1908 Richard and his brother in law George Flood with their families attended the Decoration Day services at Lowell Cemetery in Clarksville. William Flood, the dad of George and Matilda and father in law of Richard, was buried at Lowell and was a soldier in the Civil War.

In 1909, at age 52 Richard was hired as janitor and groundskeeper at the courthouse in Allison, county seat of Butler County. In addition to keeping up the building and grounds he was also the jailer, bailiff and more. In 1909 a man Win Bucknell of Greene was arrested for murder. Bucknell was in love with his housekeeper, she threatened to leave, he killed her then shot himself but the bullet was stopped by his watch chain. The gun fell to the floor, his wife picked up the gun, threw it out the window and screamed for help. Bucknell was sent to the Butler County Jail, Richard’s jail. While waiting for his trial Bucknell worked with Richard on the courthouse grounds.

The Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper on July 1 1909, ” R.J. Mockford has trimmed the trees leading to the court house and they present a beautiful and uniform appearance.” The postcard shows his skills.

Butler County Courthouse Courthousehistory.com

Butler County Courthouse via Courthousehistory.com

Richard returned to NY a couple times, once in 1901 to visit his family, “nineteen years have made a great change in his home state”. Will Angell, cousin of Matilda Flood Mockford, helped with chores while Richard was away. In April of 1905, Richard was called to NY, his dad Henry was very ill. Henry died in 1905, Richard was there in NY for the funeral.

Richard died in 1910 and is buried at Lowell Cemetery. His obituary was in the Clarksville Star newspaper October 10.

“Allison Citizen Dies. Well Known Citizen of Lowtown at One Time. Richard J. Mockford, a prominent resident of Allison and for a long time a resident of Lowtown, died on October 8, 1910, after having been ill for about six weeks. He was born near Camden, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1856, being a few days over 54 years of age at the time of his death.
On March 20th, 1883 he was united in marriage with Miss Tillie Flood and shortly afterwards they engaged in farming just south of Clarksville where they continued to reside until about five years ago when they moved to Allison. Two daughters were born to this family [Lucy] Mrs. Robt. Smith of near Allison, and Miss Philippa who with the wife are left to mourn the death of husband and father. Mr. Mockford was custodian of the court house and grounds and had in this way established a very wide acquaintance throughout the county. His circle of friends included all his acquaintances.
The funeral was held at the Congregational church at Allison on Monday Oct. 10th, at ten o’clock, conducted by Rev E. Chapman of Owatonna, Minn who in years gone by had been a neighbor of the deceased. The Woodsmen order were in charge of the services and observed the ritualistic rights. The body was brought to the Lowell Cemetery south of town for interment.”

Sources:
Clarksville (Iowa) Star Newspaper via Clarksville, Iowa public Library Digital Archives. June 4, 1908 page 4 of 8 column 1 mid top Decoration Day services at Lowell  January 17, 1901 returned from NY visit . January 3, 1901 Will Angell fills in.  October 13, 1910 obituary . July 1, 1909 Nicely trimmed trees at the courthouse

At Ancestry. 1875 New York Census, 1880 US Census
At FamilySearch. Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934

Courthousehistory . com a historical look at our nation’s county courthouses through postcards. Courthouse History is a website maintained by Keith Vincent who collects postcards of courthouse across the county and takes photos of courthouses across the country. There are 5 photos of the courthouse in Allison, Iowa, Richard Mockford’s workplace including those trees out front.
Vincent, Keith. Courthousehistory.com, n.d. Web. 17 Apr. 2016. Copyright 2010. All Rights Reserved, used with permission.
http://courthousehistory.com/gallery/states/iowa/counties/butler

Mary Barnard b. 1609

Mary Barnard 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Mary was born September 1609 in Nottinghamshire, England. Mary was a ladies maid to an acquaintance of Roger Williams. Mary and Roger married December 15, 1629 in High Laver, Essex England at All Saint Parish, still there. Their marriage record, “is recorded in the parish register of High Lever, Co. Essex, as follows: 1629 Roger Williams and Mary Barnard were married the 15th day of Decern: anno dom 1629”.

Williams Roger, Mary Barnard children screenshot

Mary and Roger Williams, children

Mary and Roger left England in December of 1631. They had 6 kids, all born in America: Mary, Freeborn, Providence, Mercy, Daniel and Jospeh. Mary and family were living in Salem where Roger was a minister until he was banished, asked to leave. He had issues with the church, was a friend to the Indians, critical of the colonies taking land with no payment, Roger and family had to leave the area. With a small group Roger founded Rhode Island in 1636. A census on September 1, 1636 shows 25 people including MAry and her family.  John Winthrop, governor of Plymouth visited Providence and left a gold coin with Mary during his visit, “Governor Winslow, of Plymouth. The guest was touched by the hardship and poverty which his old friends were enduring, and at his departure put into the hands of Mrs. Williams a piece of gold for her relief. Williams acknowledges with respect and gratitude the welcome gift”.

Sources

 

Martha Olney b. 1707

Martha Olney 7th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Martha was born in Providence, Rhode island on May 16, 1707. She was a great granddaughter of Thomas Olney, John Whipple and Roger Williams, all migrated from England and all original settlers in 1635, Rhode Island. Martha married Stephen Angell a great grandson of Thomas Angell, John Smith and Thomas Clemence, who also migrated from England and were original Rhode Island settlers. Martha and Stephen had 9 sons and 2 daughters. They were Quakers or Friends (Religious Society of Friends).

Angell Bible

Angell family bible at FamilySearch.org

Martha’s generation lived through the colonies turning into independent states. She was 53 when tax issues began, 68 when the Revolutionary War started, 76 when the war ended and 82 when General Washington was President. Martha’s son John and son in law Israel were both Colonels of Rhode Island regiments in the revolution.

Martha was a widow in 1772 and when her husband’s will was read she objected to it. In the Angell genealogy book, “she was dependent upon Daniel and William for her comfortable support … left to their discretion”. A part of the will “Item. I Give to my True and Loveing wife Martha Angell, one cow and one mare … Together with other household furniture sufficiant to keep house with at the Discretion of my Executors hereafter named, and also one good feather bed and furniture, all which to be at ther Disposal as She Thinks Proper”. The Court upheld the will and with no additional issues recorded.

Sources

George Gardiner b. 1599

George Gardiner 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

George was born in February 1599 in London. In the genealogy world there’s a ‘fierce debate’ on his parents, currently his parents are unproven with a couple theories. George had 3 wives, the first was Sarah who probably died before he sailed for America around 1636, there’s not much info on Sarah. Herodias Long was his 2nd wife there are novels, books and journals written about Herodias. George and Herodias divorced after 20 years, they were in court many times. Herodias married John Porter- her 3rd husband. George married Lydia Ballou his 3rd wife in 1665. George had children with all wives, Lydia is our ancestor, they had 6 children.

George was a freeman in Newport, Rhode Island on December 17, 1639 and a landowner on January 29, 1639/40. He was a Sergeant of an early colonial company, on the grand jury, a constable and he witnessed land deeds including a deed on June 29, 1660 ‘from an Indian called Socho of a tract of land at Pettaquamscot’. On August 1662 he and Robert Stanton bought more lands near the Pettaquamscot Purchase. And later on George’s sons with Herodias would inherit all of their stepdad John Porter’s lands in the same area.

Gardiner land map

Map of Gardiner son’s land

George died in 1677, he lived to age 78 and is probably buried in a very old forgotten cemetery somewhere in Newport, Rhode Island.

Sources

 

Ann Borodell b. 1615

Ann Borodell 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Ann was born in Cork, Ireland on May 20, 1615. Her dad John Borodell was a land owner, her mom is unknown. Ann married George Denison of England in abut 1645. There is a story of how George and Ann met, published in several sources. George had sailed to America with his family at age 11, met and married his first wife, she died within a few years, he was heartbroken, returned to England to fight in the English Civil War, was injured in the Battle of Naseby, on June 14, 1645 and sent to John Borodell’s home to recover. John’s daughter Ann nursed George back to health, they fell in love, married and sailed to America. George and Ann lived in Stonington then Mystic, Connecticut and were described as “remarkable for magnificent personal appearance, and for force of mind and character”.

Ann was a widow in 1695. From her husband’s will, “First I give and bequeath unto my dear and loving wife Ann Denison, my new mansion place, to wit the house we live in, the barns and buildings, the orchards, and the whole tract of land, and improvements thereon, as far as Mistuxet, eastward, and aa it is bounded upon record South, West and North, … all the household stuff that was, and is, properly belonging unto us … to be wholly at her disposal, to bequeath to whom she pleaseth, at her death”.

There’s a Denison Homestead Museum and a Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center on the grounds in Mystic, CT. The house is not the 1663 original that George and Ann built. That house burned down, another was built on the land and was in the Denison daily for genrations.

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