Lydia Archer b. 1601

Lydia Archer 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

This person’s name may or may not be Lydia Archer, all that is really known is that she was a wife of Francis Sprague and mom of Mercy Sprague. Francis Sprague was a Pilgrim in Plymouth colony. He sailed with Mercy Sprague and Ann Sprague in 1623. It’s proven that Mercy Sprague was his daughter. Ann Sprague could have been a daughter or could have been a wife, could have been the mom of Mercy or not. There’s nothing to show who ‘Lydia Archer’ was. 

A great source, New England marriages prior to 1700 by Clarence Torrey, has Lydia as a wife, with questions. “SPRAGUE, Francis & [?Lydia]/?Anna ____; by 1621 in Eng; Plymouth/Duxbury/Dartmouth “

The Great Migration, another solid source, shows no info on Francis’s spouse(s) and a note, ‘there are very few dates for this family and many unanswered questions’.

In the ‘cattle division’ of 1627 Francis, Anna and Mercy Sprague are listed, same 3 from the passenger list of 1623. It doesn’t seem possible that Francis was a widow caring for 2 daughters on his own, for 4 years.

Sprague family 1627

Francis, Anne and Mercy Sprague 1627 ‘cattle division’

So it’s possible Lydia died in England then Francis with 2 daughters sailed to America and married a 2nd wife in Plymouth. Or it’s possible Lydia sailed with her husband and 2 daughters, made it to Plymouth Colony and died shortly after. Then Francis married a woman, probably recently widowed, whose name was never recorded. Lydia Archer’s story is speculative, hypothetical, ’thrown together’ or made up with no proof for names, dates, relationships.

Sources

  • Volume 2 page 1425, New England marriages to 1700 database at American Ancestors
  • Volume 3 P-W, page 1725-1728, Great Migration Begins at Ancestry
  • Page 95. History of Plymouth County, Massachusetts: with biographical sketches at HathiTrust

Elizabeth Harter Bair b. 1836

Elizabeth Bair 3rd great grandma on RootsMagic

Elizabeth was born in July, 1836 in Plain Township, Stark, Ohio. She was the oldest child of George and Margaret Bowman Harter. Elizabeth’s middle name ‘Harter’ was her maternal grandmother’s maiden name. Both the Harter and Bair families were pioneers in Plain, Elizabeth’s great grandparents some of the first settlers.

Bair, Elizabeth and family 1850 census

1850 Plain Township, Ohio census, Elizabeth Bair and family

On the 1850 census Elizabeth is 13. The Bair family is on page 45 of 53. The 53 pages with 20 or fewer person on each page contain Elizabeth’s future husband’s Druckenbrod family, the Henry Miller family, future in laws of granddaughter Fianna and lots of ancestors: Miller, Bair, Harter, Druckenbrod, Malone, Kryder and Shuler families. Also in laws by marriage: Grubb, Essig, Troxel, Christ, and Bishop families. And no relation: Kissinger, Trump and Pence families too, all in this tiny township with population at 896 people in 1820 then 2277 people in 1850.

Population in Plain Township, Ohio from 1855 map

Population from 1820-1850

Elizabeth married Samuel Druckenbrod around 1854. They lived on a farm, and had 12 children. Elizabeth was 24 when the Civil War started. 320,000 Ohio men were drafted in to the war which was covered in the local newspapers: Stark County Democrat and Stark County Republican.  Elizabeth could have read Mrs. Samuel Stover’s eyewitness account of ‘the march of Lee’s rebel army into Pennsylvania; also of the retreat of the remnant of said army to the Potomac’ in the Republican and details of the battle in the Democrat.

Sources

Polly Ann Howard b. 1813

Polly Howard 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Polly was born on October 17, 1813 in Indiana, not yet a state. Her mom Phoebe was from Kentucky and her dad Elbert from Georgia. Polly was the only sister with four brothers. In 1833 Polly married Benjamin Swain. By 1837 Benjamin, Polly and Polly’s parents and brothers were in Lake, Illinois. In Lake, IL Benjamin was known as Yankee Swain- the only resident not recently from England, Germany, Ireland, Poland, etc. Polly and Benjamin had 4 children. Polly was suddenly a widow in 1847.
In 1849 she married Jacob Montgomery he was also a widow. The 1850 census showed Jacob, Polly and their kids. Next door were Charles and William, Jacob’s sons from his first marriage. Polly’s dad and brothers were also nearby, married with families. By 1855 Polly Howard Swain Montgomery with Jacob, his kids, her kids, their kids, Polly’s dad and her Howard brothers, they all moved to Floyd County, Iowa where they owned land. And they attended church, the Howardville Church is still right there today. Polly’s dad Elbert held services in his home as the church was being built. A couple sources state Howardville or Howard Grove Township is named for the Howards.

Polly, 45, and her brother Sanders, 36, both died in 1858 and are buried in Howardville Cemetery.

Howard, Polly headstone closeup

Polly Howard Swain Montgomery headstone closeup

Sources

Lydia Parrish b. 1687

Lydia Parrish 8th great grandma on RootsMagic

Lydia was born in Groton, Massachusetts on April 20, 1687, the daughter of John Parrish and his 2nd wife Mary Wattles.

Parrish, Lydia 1687 birth register

Lydia’s family moved from Groton to Ipswich, Massachusetts, then to Preston, Connecticut. In Preston on May 20, 1705 Lydia married Christopher Tracy. Lydia’s brother Benjamin married Mary Tracy and Lydia’s sister Sarah married David Tracy, David and Mary were siblings of Christopher. The Tracy and Parrish families all stayed in the Preston, New London Connecticut area. Lydia and Christopher had 9 children. Lydia was a widow in 1725 and the executor of her husband’s estate. After her husband’s death Lydia probably lived with a daughter and family, and probably died around 1745.

Sources

Hannah Littlefield b. 1633

Hannah Littlefield 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Hannah was baptized on August 10, 1633 with her twin, Thomas at St Peters Church Titchfield. This church was built beginning in the 7th century, with updates and additions it still stands and has an amazing history involving monks, Henry the 8th, Victorian disapproval and more. Photos on google Maps. Hannah, her dad, grandpa and grandma all lived in Titchfield. Hannah’s grandma Mary Littlefield is buried at St Peters. Hannah would barely remember Titchfield, she left for America at 5 years old. Her dad and a brother sailed earlier, then Hannah, her mom. siblings and two servants, maybe one a tutor sailed on the Bevis in 1638. The Littlefields were in Boston, then left for Wells, Maine where they were among the first settlers on the Webhannet River.

At age 29 Hannah married Peter Cloyes. Hannah and Peter stayed in Salem, they probably had 10 children. Hannah had died by 1683 when Peter married Sarah Towne, also a widow.

Hannah was named in her mom and dad’s wills. Her dad Edmund leaves her 15 pounds, her mom Annis leaves Hannah a bed and bolster, woolens and linens and Annis leaves son in law Peter acres of land.

Sources

Martha Bulkeley b. 1572

Martha Bulkeley 11th great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Martha was born in Odell, Bedfordshire England in 1572. Her father and then her younger brother Peter were pastors at All Saints Parish in Odell. Martha would have been baptized and married in the church which was built in the 1400s and is still standing. Martha married Abraham Mellows around 1595. In 1630s England, Martha, her husband, her brother Peter and other friends and church members left England for America specifically for religious freedom. The Mellows arrived before 1633 when they were admitted to the First Church of Charlestown, Massachusetts.. “Abraham Mellows and Martha his wife and Edward Mellows their son … were admitted to Charlestown church on August 19 1633.”. The family stayed in Charlestown and Martha and Abraham had at least 8 children. Their son Edward was the first husband of Hannah Smith 9th great grandma.

  • Source
    Charlestown (Mass.). Records of the First church in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1632-1789, Boston Printed for J.F. Hunnewell, by D. Clapp and Son 1880
    http://tinyurl.com/y66jzuk6

 

Humphrey Blake b. 1494

Humphrey Blake 15th great grandpa on RootsMagic Tree

Humphrey Blake was born about 1494 and died about 1558. Humphrey was the 2nd son of William and ‘seated himself’ at Over Storey, Somerset, England. He married Ann, her last name is unknown, they had several children. Humphrey was a clothier, he turned wool yarns into textile, cloth for clothing, draperies and what not. Humphrey leased a manor Plainsfield, his son John bought the manor. The Blake family church was nearby, St Peter and Paul, there are parish records with births, marriages and burials of the Blake family. The church still stands. The manor, Plainfield in 1890 or so was rented by a tenant and probably just crumbled away. Humphrey’s will dated November 1558 was destroyed in the bombing of England 1940-41 but an abstract or summary survives. He left money to the church for repair and ornament. The will named his children and wife and gave money and/or possessions to each.

Humphrey was buried on December 28, 1558 at St Peter and Paul Church. In the middle passage of the church there is a monumental tablet for Humphrey and Ann. The inscription reads: “Here lyeth the bodye of Humfry Blake of Overstowey clothier deceased, who was buried the 20 day of March Anno Domini 1619 Also Ann, the wife of Humfry Blake, was here interred December ye 11, 1645”. A photo is on this genealogy website: Somerset – Over Stowey, Combe St. Nicholas by Mary Mettler at California Genealogical Society, CaliforniaAncestors.org

Volume 1 page 59 Humphrey’s will, an abstract. Abstracts of Somersetshire Wills, Etc.: Copied From the Manuscript Collections of the Late Rev. Frederick Brown

Over Stowey on Wikipedia, photo of St Peter and St Paul
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Over_Stowey

Page 260 Humphrey and Ann Blake’s monument and Plainfield Manor. Collinson, John. The History and Antiquities of the County of Somerset. Bath, England: Printed by R. Cruttwell, 1791