Mehitable Angell b. 1800

Mehitable Angell 6th great aunt on RootsMagic tree.
Mehitable was born January 31, 1800 in Johnston, Rhode Island to Israel and Susannah Luther Angell. Israel Angell’s life is documented because he was a Colonel in the American Revolution! and recognized by General George Washington! Anyway Israel also explored the west August 4 to October 9, 1788. The ‘west’ only went as far as Ohio, Israel kept a journal of his travels these are published in Rhode Island History magazine of January and April, 1963. Israel’s kids would have heard stories of his western travels. Only 2 of his 17 kids moved west: Mehitable and her younger brother Henry.

Mehitable married William Wilkinson. Henry married William’s sister Eliza Wilkinson and they all moved across the country, first stop Hennepin, Illinois where they were on the 1850 census. Henry and his family stayed there in Illinois. Mehitable and her family went 200 miles further west to Jefferson Township in Buchanan County, Iowa where they’re on the 1856 Iowa census. When the Wilkinson’s set up their home it would have been on acres and acres and acres of prairie- Iowa was 80% prairie in 1850, admitted as a state in 1846. Mehitable’s family farmed, she and William had four children they stayed there in Jefferson Township. Mehitable was a widow the last 12 years of her life and lived with her son and family. She is buried in Spring Creek Cemetery.

Angell, Mahetebel d. 1877

Headstone Mahetebel Wilkinson wife of W B Wilkinson

Mehitable Angell is probably the reason Delia and Charles Angell ended up in Iowa. When Delia’s mom died in 1847 her dad Dexter went to New York where his dad and brothers were. Delia and Charles stayed in Indiana with their older sister, then left for Iowa. Delia stayed with Charles and his family until she married and had a daughter Matilda Flood, who had a daughter Philippa Mockford who had a daughter Elizabeth Speedy.

Sources

  • Iowa census 1856, Buchanan, Jefferson at Ancestry
  • Angell Family Bible, typed up sheet. Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914 database at FamilySearch

Benjamin English b. 1705

Benjamin English 7th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born February 3, 1705 in New Haven Connecticut, British America. He lived through the early days of the Revolutionary War and died towards the end of it, murdered in the Invasion of New Haven. This July 5, 1779 invasion is in lots of sources. Benjamin’s daughter in law Abigail provided a first hand account of his death in court. It’s sad and tragic but makes a reader appreciate all that went in to making America a free country 240 years ago.

Map of Hew Haven invasion

Drawing of 1779 Jul 5 invasion of New Haven

Benjamin was named after his dad, the 2nd of seven children. He married Sarah Dayton, “Benjamin English and Sarah Daton both of New Haven were Joined in marriage to Each other the 25th day of Sept:1735 Isaac Dickerman Justice of Peace.” Benjamin and Sarah stayed in New Haven and had at least 5 children. They named their first son Benjamin, he was s a Captain in King Philips War.

Sources

Sarah Cable b. 1854

Sarah Cable 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Sarah Cable was born December 1854 near Dane, Wisconsin to Jonathan and Charlotte Knapp Cable. She had three brothers, Chancey, John, William and a sister Violetta. The Cable family moved from Wisconsin to Pleasant Grove, Iowa by 1865 when Sarah’s dad Jonathan paid taxes on a melodeon. If they had a melodeon in their home (not common in 1865) they probably had lots of music and dances. The melodeon could have been a ‘rocking’ or a parlor type.

Cable, Sarah 1876 marriage

Sarah married Horace Towslee July 29, 1876 in Floyd County. Horace and Sarah had one daughter, Ethel. In 1880 they were in Wisconsin with John and Chancey Cable in a boarding house where the men worked the railroad and Sarah ran the household. Sarah was in St Paul in 1893, a widow and dressmaker with her daughter Ethel age 5 and her sister Violetta. In 1900 Sarah lived in Chicago with her sister Violetta and her nephew Chauncey son of John Cable. Sarah was a dressmaker, Violetta a stenographer and Chauncey was 9 years old and in school. They lived at 384 Paulina St. in ‘West Town’ Chicago. Today and maybe in 1900 the ‘L’ -began in 1892- is/was right overhead.

In 1910 Sarah was in Seattle and lived with Violetta and Violetta’s husband and nephew Leonard Cable. Sarah’s brother Chancey was also in Seattle, his 1910 will papers show his siblings. Sarah was in Skagit, Washington, north of Seattle, at her death in 1912.

Sources

  • U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995, 1893 St Paul, Minnesota at Ancestry
  • Iowa County Marriages 1838-1934 at FamilySearch.org
  • Washington, Wills and Probate Records, 1851-1970 at Ancestry
  • Melodeons at Wikipedia 

Harm Henrichs b. 1877

Harm Siebelt Henrichs 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Harm was born on July 1, 1877 in Aurich, Lower Saxony, Germany. With his 8 brothers and sisters, mom Maria and dad Henrich he sailed to America and arrived in Baltimore on March 18, 1885. The US 1900 census shows the Henrichs family in Ripley Township, Butler County Iowa. Harm and his siblings Fred, Tena and Mattie are living with Henrich and Maria, the older children have started families of their own in Butler County.

The 1930 census of Jefferson Township in Butler County shows Harm, his wife Jennie and their 2 kids living on their own farm. Harms’s sisters are neighbors: William and Tena Henrichs Jacobs, Enno and Annie Henrichs Frerichs, John and Marie Henrichs Stoppelmoor, Harry and Flora Henrichs Endleman. Harm’s bothers John and Fred lived close by in Ripley and West Point townships. They all lived on farms. They built houses, barns, shelters for their livestock, chicken houses; cleared and laid out crop fields.

Ebenezer Lutheran Church Butler Center, Iowa

They also built a church: Ebenezer Lutheran Church, no longer around. The photo is from the book Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002. Harm is 4th from left. Left to right: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann- brother in law, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs -brother in law and grandpa of Stanley Roose, dad of Mary Frerichs Roose. Stopping work to snap a photo probably took a lot of convincing on the photographer’s part. The photo doesn’t have a date, it’s probably around 1905

The 1940 census shows Harm is still farming, age 62, with Jennie. Their daughter Anna is 2 farms away, married to Addo Janssen with one son Robert. Their son Henry is in Jefferson Township, married to Delma DeBower.

Sources

  • Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002, page 152. A Building Project with text: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs. Author’s permission to post photo. More on this book.
  • US Census 1900, 1930, 1940 at Ancestry and FamilySearch
  • Maryland Baltimore passenger lists index 1820-1897 at FamilySearch

John Speedy b. 1825

John Speedy 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree

John was the 2nd son of Thomas and Elizabeth Glenn Speedy, the older brother of Manford Speedy. John was born in 1825 in Jefferson County, Ohio. He grew up on a farm. On March 8, 1855 he married Jane Foulks, a sister of his his older brother Thomas’s wife. John and Jane farmed and had 4 kids. The 1850 US agricultural census shows John Speedy’s farm: 40 acres of improved land, 18  acres of unimproved, $1650 cash value of farm, $ 85 cash value of machinery,  2 horses, 5 cows,13 sheep, 5 pigs, $ 250 value of livestock; produced 200 bushels of wheat, 300 bushels of Indian corn,  200 bushels of oats, 158 lb. of wool, 20 lb. of Irish potatoes, 200 lb. of butter, 2 tons of hay.

In 1863 John was 38 and was drafted or signed up for the Civil War. He fought with the Ohio 157th Infantry Company K, he was a Private. The 157th Infantry reported to Columbus, Ohio for duty on May 15, 1864, one of the’ Hundred Days’ Men’. The infantry went from Columbus, Ohio to Baltimore then on to guard Fort Delaware on the Delaware River south of Philadelphia. A Major Eames wrote, “Our journey from Columbus to Baltimore was tedious but full of interest. All along the route we were saluted with cheers and smiles and waving of handkerchiefs and flags from early dawn to long after sunset. Never in all my campaigning have I seen anything to compare with those manifestations of rejoicing for the promptness of the 100 day men of Ohio”. At Fort Delaware the soldiers were guarding Confederate prisoners of war. When not on duty John probably watched ships sailing and fished. “The heavy shipping traffic on the Delaware River was a source of fascination to the farm boys from Ohio, who would sit and watch the steamers, side-wheelers, ironclads and fishing boats for hours”. Fort Delaware is where John died. He and 9 others died from disease. 

Speedy, John in 157th Ohio Infantry

John Speedy, 157th Ohio Company K

Sources

 

 

Alexander Glenn b. 1803

Alexander Glenn 4th great uncle on RootsMagic

Alexander was born in Ohio in 1803, a younger brother of Elizabeth Glenn, mom of Manford Speedy, they were 2 of 12 children in the Glenn family. In 1833 on March 31, Alexander married Sarah Parrish in Ohio. It’s very likely that Manford Speedy with his uncle Alexander and family left Ohio for Iowa, all are in Shell Rock, Iowa by 1856. Alexander is on the 1860 agricultural census. His farm has 100 acres of  improved land, 100 acres unimproved land, cash value of $3500, value of farm machinery $150. The farm has 4 horses, 6 milk cows,  6 other cattle, 30 swine, value of livestock $725. The farm produced 225 bushel of wheat,  600 bushel of Indian corn,  200 bushel of oats, 100 lbs of butter, 15 lbs of cheese and 20 bushel Irish potatoes. Alexander was a widow in 1877 and living in Hampton, Iowa with his son Edward and family.

Alexander died in 1894 and is buried in the Old Town Cemetery in Clarksville, Iowa. The source Iowa Cemetery Records, 1662-1999 confirms he was buried in this cemetery: ‘Alex Glenn b. 1803, d. 1894 age 91 buried in Old-town Cemetery, Clarksville, Butler County. Source Gravestone Records of Butler County, Iowa page 37’. The Glenn headstone has a readable inscription for Sarah. On the other side of the headstone is some engraving, most likely Alexander’s information, completely unreadable because it was made 125 years ago, weather and age have worn the words away. The headstone has an open book at the top, inscription also worn away.

Glenn, Alexander and Sarah headstone has a book on top.

 

Sources

  • Iowa, Cemetery Records, 1662-1999
  • Ohio county marriages 1789-2013 database
  • Iowa non-population census schedules 1850-1880 images

Yevkea Frerichs b. 1862

Updated from August 5 2017

Yevkea Frerichs 3rd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Yevkea  Frerichs was born on February 26, 1862 in Germany. She was the oldest child of Casjen and Kuna Janssen Frerichs and was already married when she emigrated in 1883. She and her husband Joost Reents were on the same ship as Yevkea’s family- the America which sailed from Germany, checked in at a New York harbor then docked in Baltimore, Maryland on October 10, 1883. Both Joost and Yevkea have ‘brewer’ as their occupation on immigration cards. Fairly quickly the whole group was in Butler County, Iowa. How they made this 1000 mile journey isn’t known.

Yevkea’s name on records is: Kate, Carrie, Jerkea, Terker. Her name was almost certainly Yevkea or Yeikea.

Frerichs Reents, Yevkea immigration 1883

Yevkea had her first child on June 15 1884, Kurnie Reen

ts. Another son Casjen and a daughter Jennie survived to adulthood. Yevkea and her infant daughter died in the winter of 1891. Joost married again, Henrieko Winterboer from Germany, they had children and settled in South Dakota. The family farmed. Yevkea and Joost’s son Casjen also farmed in South Dakota then lived and is buried in Bend, Oregon. Daughters Kurnie Dockter stayed in South Dakota, had a family and lived to age 95,  Jennie Giebink stayed in South Dakota, married and her family farmed.

Yevkea is buried at Jungling Cemetery near Allison, Iowa. Her mom and dad Kuna and Casjen are buried in buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in Parkersburg Iowa, their headstones look the same and both have a mix of English and German words.

Sources