Oliver Angell b. 1717

Oliver Angell 7th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.
Oliver was born February 20, 1717, the 2nd of Hope and Lydia Olney Angell’s 7 children. On June 13, 1740 Oliver and Naomi Smith were married by Reverend Josiah Cotton in Providence, Rhode Island. Oliver and Naomi farmed and raised 7 children in Providence. Oliver was also a ‘cooper’ he made barrels, baskets and casks; a carpenter and a shoemaker.

Angell, Hope and Lydia Olney, their children

Hope Angell and Lydia Olney, children.

Oliver died on April 1, 1799, his wife Naomi died December 3, 1799 and their grand daughter Adah died October 9, 1799. These 3 Angells and 16 others are buried in the Rhode Island Hist. Cemetery North Providence #8, also known as the Hope Angell Lot, or the Oliver Angell Lot. This tiny cemetery has 19 burials, was originally on Angell farmland and is now in a residential area between two houses. If you’re related to Elizabeth Speedy Roose, you’re related to 17 of the 19 buried there, all but Elisha Angell’s 2 wives.

Oliver Angell has an obituary posted on his Find a Grave Memorial

“Providence Gazette, April 6, 1799, p. 2:
At North-Providence, on the 1st inst. Mr. Oliver Angell, in the 83d year of his age, who sustained an unblemished character. As a citizen he was firm in the support of government; as a husband he was kind and affectionate; as a parent he taught his children the love of virtue in their early years, and by his example daily set before them, shewed that he had himself experienced the happy effects. Few who lived to his advanced age could say, as he did, that he was never sued at law, nor sued any person, but lived in peace with them all.”

The 19 burials in the Hope and/or Oliver Angell Lot
1, 2 Oliver and Naomi Smith Angell
3 Ruth Angell daughter
4, 5 Elisha Angell, son and his wife Anna Fenner
6, 7, 8, 9 – Elisha’s son Fenner Angell, Fenner’s wife Mary Smith Angell, their son Zachariah Angell, Elisha’s 2nd wife Mary Dean Angell.
10, 11, 12, Hope Angell son and his wife Avis Olney, their daughter Adah.
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 – Hope’s son Smith Angell, Smith’s wife Freelove Harris, their daughters Asenath and Minerva, their sons Horace Lafayette, Thomas and Zalmon.

Charles Wisbar b. 1880

Charles Wisbar great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Charles was born August 30, 1880 and was the 6th, of 8, children of Martin and Mary Walters Wisbar. Born in Cook County Illinois “his parents moved with their family to a farm northeast of Parkersburg when he was but eight weeks old.” Charles grew up and stayed in the Parkersburg area and married Trena Vanderlan on April 3, 1902. Johann Roose, brother in law, married to Charles’s sister Lena was a witness to the marriage.

Wisbar, Charles and Trena Vanderlaan 1902 marriage 2

Charles and Trena marriage 1902

Wisbar, Charles Woodman's resolution

Resolution of Respect

Charles was a farmer, cement worker and construction worker he fixed up houses in the area. Then he worked at and managed a creamery and attended conferences of the Iowa State Dairy Association. Charles died suddenly at age 28 on May 26, 1909. His obituary was in the Parkersburg Eclipse newspaper on June 3, 1909. There’s also a thank you note from Charles’s widow, “Especially to the Woodmen and the teachers and pupils of the school for the beautiful flowers”. In the same paper the Woodmen (now Modern Woodmen of America) wrote up a Resolution of Respect for Charles and for his family.

Online. Parkersburg (Iowa) Eclipse 1909 Jun 3 1909 Page 5 of 9 column 3 bottom Charles Wisbar Obituary and Woodmen resolution.

At FamilySearch. Iowa county marriages 1838-1934 database. Reference ID 3684 FHL 001035398 Digital Folder 004311190 Image 00354 viewable at Family History Center

At FamilySearch. Iowa deaths and burials 1850-1990 database. Indexing Project (Batch) B07474-6 System Origin Iowa-EASy FHL 1035396 Reference ID item 7 rn 138

At Wikipedia ModernWoodmen of America 

John Cable b. 1847

John Cable 2nd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

John Cable was born March 22, 1847 in Somerset, Pennsylvania. His dad is Jonathan Cable his mom is most likely Eliza Frey, who died when John was about 5, his 2nd mom was Charlotte Knapp.

John lived in Pennsylvania, then his family moved to Jefferson, Wisconsin. By 1860 John was in Pleasant Grove, Floyd County, Iowa, living on a farm. In 1880 he was in Edson Wisconsin, a railroad contractor. John owned a home, maybe a boarding house. His brother Chancey and sister Sarah’s family lived there too.

Cables 1880 snapshot

John Cable’s cenus in 1880

The house could have been known as Cable’s Railroad Camp?. The 1880 census sheet is handwritten, hard to read. Anyway John was the contractor, his sister Sarah, her husband Horace Towslee and daughter Ethel, Cable brother Chancey, along with a cook, a servant and 20+ laborers lived in the home.

By 1885 John was in Minnesota. ON February 13, 1890 he married Frances Allen in Ramsey Minnesota. Their child Chauncey was baptized September 4, 1891 in St Paul at the St. Paul Goodrich Avenue Presbyterian Church.

US Presbyterian Records 1743-1970

John and Frances’s son Chauncey baptized

 

John lived in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington. His last 20 years he lived in Chicago where he died. John’s funeral was held at his brother William’s home in December 1924 and he’s buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery in Pleasant Grove, Iowa probably near his brother William, John’s headstone not yet found. The obituary was in the December 10, 1924 Iowa (Greene) Recorder. “For the past twenty six years he has made his home in Chicago, Ill. working at his trade as an inventor. Mr Cable was not a member of any church but had a Christian heart and was a generous giver.”

Online. Iowa (Greene) recorder, Digital Archives. 1924 Dec 10 page 9 of 16 column 4 midway. 

At FamilySearch. United States Census, 1880. John Cable, 1880; citing enumeration district ED 186, sheet 336D, NARA microfilm publication T9

At Ancestry. U.S., Presbyterian Records, 1743-1970. Minnesota St. Paul Goodrich Avenue Presbyterian Church Page 138 image 346 of 356

At FamilySearch. Minnesota county marriages 1860-1949 database with images. FHL 001314517, Digital Folder 005193351, Image 00382 (382 of 715)

John Drake b. 1585

John Drake 12th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Drake was born in England about 1585. Past research on John Drake connected him to King Henry the 8th, Shakespeare and Sir Francis Drake, but it’s all been proven very unlikely. So John was born in England where he married Elizabeth and they had 5 children. In 1630 the Drakes arrived in America, sailing on the Mary and John. The passengers on this ship are considered the founders of Windsor, Connecticut. They lived in Dorchester first then the whole group moved to Windsor, Connecticut. John was a woodworker, a farmer and was active in town services. He was on several juries and on December 1, 1645 one of the constables in charge of gathering up knapsacks filled with powder and bullets, delivering those knapsacks to a Mr Talcott and keeping a written record of the ‘particulars so delivered’.

John died in an accident. Driving a cart full of corn ‘Something Scard the Cattle and they Set a running, and he Labouring to Stop them, by taking hold on the mare, was thrown’.

He wrote his will in 1659 and mentions each of his children.

John’s burial is unknown but his name is on the Founders of Windsor Monument at Palisado Cemetery in Windsor, Connecticut. The monument reads, “To the founders of Windsor and the First Congregational Church in Connecticut which came to America in the Mary and John with its pastor John Warham May 30, 1630, Settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts and migrated to Windsor in May and October 1635.”Snapshot for the Windsor Historical Society. 3 ancestors of Faber Miller are on the monument: John Drake, Thomas Dewey and Henry Wolcott

Planters of the Commonwealth, Page 87 the Drake family sails to America.

A report of the record commissioners of the city of Boston, Volume 29 page 133 Misc. papers, Oct 19, 1630, a Freeman.

A digest of the early Connecticut probate records, Volume 1 page 111, 112 John Drake’s dated will with wife, children.

The descendants of John Drake of Windsor, Connecticut, after page 2 images of John Drake’s handwritten will.

Windsor Historical Society, the Founder’s Monument
https://windsorhistoricalsociety.org/founders-of-windsor-trades-professions/

John Pierce b. 1639

John Pierce 9th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

He said and he did. Dixit et Fecit . 

John Pierce was born about 1639 in either America or England. His last name could have been Pierce, Pearce or Pearse or any variation. He was in Boston in 1659 where he married Isabel her last name is unknown. John was a bricklayer and mason. He and his family stayed in Boston. John wrote his will April 8 1690 and probably died soon after this. His burial place is unknown, a lot of unknowns. Mary Pierce (8th great grandmother) had a birth record in Boston: Mary ye Daughter of John Pearse and of Isabell his wife borne 13 March 1661 or 62. The year is listed as 1661 or 1662 because of the worldwide switch from the Julian, of Julius Caesar, to Gregorian, of Pope Gregory 13, calendar. The calendar switch made some years Old Style or New Style, double dates show this.

Pierce coat of arms

Dixit et Fecit: He said and he did.

The Pierce coat of arms shows Three Ravens. The Crest is a Dove with an olive branch.

At HathiTrust. Pierce genealogy, page xiv John Pierce, page 16 or so coat of arms picture

At Archive.org

John Connable b. 1650

John Connable 8th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Connable was born in England about 1650 or so. An Ancestry source “US Craftperson Files 1600-1995” shows his occupation as carpenter, joiner, artisan. This craftsman source leads to a 30 page paper “The Seventeenth Century Case Furniture of Essex County, Massachusetts, and Its Makers”. Author Benno Forman researched ‘the origins of the joined chest of drawers’ in early America. The conclusion, “only one man John Cunnable could have brought this style to Boston’. The author includes the ‘Garvan’ chest at Yale’s Art Gallery as evidence.

Connable chest of drawers

The Garvan chest at Yale

Connable, John joiner

Then only one man, John Connable, could have brought the style to New England.

Connable, John signature

John Cunabell, joiner of London

Besides his skills in woodworking John married 3 times, had a large family, fought in King Philips War, took the Oath of Allegiance, was a freeman and for several years a ’tithing man’ responsible for arresting travelers on Sunday – travel was forbidden on the Sabbath.

His death is recorded in a diary of the time, “10. On ye 10 in ye morning about 5 old Mr. Connabell, ye joiner, dyed and buryed on ye 13 day aged 74 years 3 months 15 days”.

Online
The Garvan chest at Yale Art Gallery

The article Seventeenth Century Case Furniture
image 14 of 31
Catalog page http://www.jstor.org/stable/1180998?origin=JSTOR-pdf

“The drawers of the Garvan chest and the SPNEA chest (fig. to), in contrast to those in all the joined furniture known to have been made elsewhere in Massachusetts before 1675, are held together with dovetails, as opposed to the usual, rural Anglo-American technique of nailing flushcut drawer sides into rabbets planed into the sides of the drawer fronts”

At Archive.org
Volume 15 page 201 Diary of Jeremiah Bumstead of Boston 1722-1727 in The New England historical and genealogical register 1861 Volume 15.

At Ancestry
U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995

At HathiTrust
Volume 1 page 9 several pages. Genealogical memoir of the Cunnabell, Conable or Connable family.

Jospeh Jenckes b. 1628

Joseph Jenckes 10th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

Joseph was born and baptized October 1628 in England. In his 20s, by 1650 he was working at his dad Joseph Sr’s iron forge in the new colony of Lynn, Massachusetts. In 1660 Joseph is tried for treason after he said he wanted to turn King Charles’s head in to a football. He said this probably in a tavern, drinking, after work with friends, was overheard and turned in to the courts. There was some kind of trial, Jospeh was jailed, then he wrote a long letter to the court, he was released and the charges were dropped.

In 1663 Jospeh lived through the earthquakes in Lynn. The first one was January 27, “chimneys fell, people were forced to seize upon supports to prevent falling. On the evening of the fifth of the next month another earthquake; in some places doors opened and shut, walls split, bells rang, and floors fell. Between that time and July, thirty shocks took place, the earth seemed to undulate, as if upon stupendous waves, rolling from the northwest. In some instances ponds were dried up, the courses of streams changed, trees torn up, and hills riven”.

March of 1669 Jospeh had left Lynn for Pawtuxet, Rhode Island. He built and ran a sawmill and iron forge. He and his family were some of the first settlers and Jospeh held different town, civil positions.

In 1689, with the governor of Rhode Island and others, Jospeh signed the ‘Petition from the Governor and Council of Rhode Island, to their Majesties William and Mary, of England’ congratulating the new King and Queen of England and the colonies. “Most dread Sovereign : We your Majesties’ most humble subjects and supplicants of your Collony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in New England, having received the joyful tidings of both your Majesties’ safe arrival in England, after your so great and hazardous undertaking, for the good of the nation, to relieve them from Popery and arbitrary power; as also Concerning your accessions to the Crown”.
Annals of Lynn 1660 page 251: tried for treason

On Wikipedia with sources: Jospeh Jenckes, Jr.

Annals of Lynn 1663 page 252: earthquakes

1663 Charlevoix earthquake

Records of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations
Volume 3 page 258: a letter to  William and Mary