John Drake b. 1585

John Drake 12th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Drake was born in England about 1585. Past research on John Drake connected him to King Henry the 8th, Shakespeare and Sir Francis Drake, but it’s all been proven very unlikely. So John was born in England where he married Elizabeth and they had 5 children. In 1630 the Drakes arrived in America, sailing on the Mary and John. The passengers on this ship are considered the founders of Windsor, Connecticut. They lived in Dorchester first then the whole group moved to Windsor, Connecticut. John was a woodworker, a farmer and was active in town services. He was on several juries and on December 1, 1645 one of the constables in charge of gathering up knapsacks filled with powder and bullets, delivering those knapsacks to a Mr Talcott and keeping a written record of the ‘particulars so delivered’.

John died in an accident. Driving a cart full of corn ‘Something Scard the Cattle and they Set a running, and he Labouring to Stop them, by taking hold on the mare, was thrown’.

He wrote his will in 1659 and mentions each of his children.

John’s burial is unknown but his name is on the Founders of Windsor Monument at Palisado Cemetery in Windsor, Connecticut. The monument reads, “To the founders of Windsor and the First Congregational Church in Connecticut which came to America in the Mary and John with its pastor John Warham May 30, 1630, Settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts and migrated to Windsor in May and October 1635.”Snapshot for the Windsor Historical Society. 3 ancestors of Faber Miller are on the monument: John Drake, Thomas Dewey and Henry Wolcott

Planters of the Commonwealth, Page 87 the Drake family sails to America.

A report of the record commissioners of the city of Boston, Volume 29 page 133 Misc. papers, Oct 19, 1630, a Freeman.

A digest of the early Connecticut probate records, Volume 1 page 111, 112 John Drake’s dated will with wife, children.

The descendants of John Drake of Windsor, Connecticut, after page 2 images of John Drake’s handwritten will.

Windsor Historical Society, the Founder’s Monument
https://windsorhistoricalsociety.org/founders-of-windsor-trades-professions/

John Whipple b. 1617

John Whipple 10th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Whipple was born in Essex, England in 1617. John age 14 or 15 arrived in Dorchester, now part of Boston, late summer of 1632. A servant of Israel Stoughton, John would have agreed to work 4-5 years in exchange for travel to America. His arrangement with Stoughton didn’t start out so well. October of 1632 John and another servant, Alex, were brought to court and ordered to pay Stoughton a certain sum each, for the powder and shot they’d wasted. In 1640 John was a Freeman, he’d worked off his debt. In 1641 he married Sarah, her last name is not known.

By 1658 he lived in Providence and stayed through King Philipps War, one of 27. These 27 who ’ staid’ were rewarded with a servant, an American Indian, captured in the war. Depending on their age the captured servants worked a certain time then had their freedom again. The Puritans believed this was an OK arrangement compared to other colonies that killed Indians captured in King Philips War. Through the years John was a carpenter, farmer, tavern keeper and chosen for lots of town services: selectman, treasurer, surveyor, etc. He was also on several committees, even in colonial America there were committees and meetings.

John Whipple's will 1682

John Whipple’s will 1682

John wrote his will May 8, 1682 with all his children named and son Joseph as executor. “Be it known to all persons to whom this may come, that I, John Whipple of the town of Providence, in the colony of Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, in New England (Sen.) being in good measure of health, and in perfect memory, upon consideration of mortality, not knowing the day of my death, and having many children, and to prevent difference that otherwise may hereafter arise among them concerning my worldly estate, do see cause to make my will and do hereby dispose of all my estate in this world and do make my last Will and Testament.”

John died May 16 and is buried in Providence at North Burial Ground. He and Sarah have matching headstones, dated from 1740, not the 1680s.

 

Records of the Governor and company of the Massachusetts Bay, Volume 1 page 100 John Whipple and another in court.

The early records of the town of Providence, Volume 8 page 12 27 who ‘staid’ And Volume 15, page 161 details 

Rhode Island historic cemetery database
http://rihistoriccemeteries.org/newgravedetails.aspx?ID=215026

The early records of the town of Providence Volume 6 page 124-135 John Whipple’s will, inventory, probate.

John Connable b. 1650

John Connable 8th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Connable was born in England about 1650 or so. An Ancestry source “US Craftperson Files 1600-1995” shows his occupation as carpenter, joiner, artisan. This craftsman source leads to a 30 page paper “The Seventeenth Century Case Furniture of Essex County, Massachusetts, and Its Makers”. Author Benno Forman researched ‘the origins of the joined chest of drawers’ in early America. The conclusion, “only one man John Cunnable could have brought this style to Boston’. The author includes the ‘Garvan’ chest at Yale’s Art Gallery as evidence.

Connable chest of drawers

The Garvan chest at Yale

Connable, John joiner

Then only one man, John Connable, could have brought the style to New England.

Connable, John signature

John Cunabell, joiner of London

Besides his skills in woodworking John married 3 times, had a large family, fought in King Philips War, took the Oath of Allegiance, was a freeman and for several years a ’tithing man’ responsible for arresting travelers on Sunday – travel was forbidden on the Sabbath.

His death is recorded in a diary of the time, “10. On ye 10 in ye morning about 5 old Mr. Connabell, ye joiner, dyed and buryed on ye 13 day aged 74 years 3 months 15 days”.

Online
The Garvan chest at Yale Art Gallery

The article Seventeenth Century Case Furniture
image 14 of 31
Catalog page http://www.jstor.org/stable/1180998?origin=JSTOR-pdf

“The drawers of the Garvan chest and the SPNEA chest (fig. to), in contrast to those in all the joined furniture known to have been made elsewhere in Massachusetts before 1675, are held together with dovetails, as opposed to the usual, rural Anglo-American technique of nailing flushcut drawer sides into rabbets planed into the sides of the drawer fronts”

At Archive.org
Volume 15 page 201 Diary of Jeremiah Bumstead of Boston 1722-1727 in The New England historical and genealogical register 1861 Volume 15.

At Ancestry
U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995

At HathiTrust
Volume 1 page 9 several pages. Genealogical memoir of the Cunnabell, Conable or Connable family.

Samuel Tefft b. 1643

Samuel Tefft 9th great-grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Samuel was born near Kingstown, Rhode Island in 1643. His parents were John and Mary, he had a brother Joshua and 2 sisters. Samuel moved to Providence RI his first record there in 1676 when he’s named guardian of brother Joshua’s son. Joshua was accused of treason in the Great Swamp Fight of King Philips War and put on trial for fighting with the Narragansett tribe against New England colonies. Joshua was found guilty and hanged. That’s when Samuel and Jireh Bull (husband of Godsgift Arnold) were named guardians of Joshua’s son Peter.

In 1676 or 77 Samuel married Elizabeth Jenckes, daughter of Joseph, sister to Gov’r Jenckes. Samuel was a freeman in 1677 and by 1687 the Teffts had moved to Kingstown Rhode Island by 1687. Samuel wrote his will on March 16, 1725. He put his widow Elizabeth in charge of the estate and she received all moveables, the dwelling house, orchards, and more. Samuel’s kids and grandkids are named in this will. He owned a lot: lands, livestock, housewares, a sword and 2 linen wheels, 2 spinning wheels, a pair of worsted combs and yarn.

Samuel Tefft and Daniel Williams elected the Grand Jury, 1679

Samuel Tefft and Daniel Williams elected the Grand Jury, 1679

Benedict Arnold b. 1615

Benedict Arnold 11th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

This Benedict Arnold was born in 1615 in Ilchester, England and was 19 when he sailed with his family to Massachusetts Bay. (This is Benedict Arnold No. 1, his 2nd great grandson was Benedict No. 5 of the American then British army). By 1636 the Arnolds were in Providence. In 1640 Benedict married Damaris Westcott, her family probably sailed to America on the same ship with the Arnold family. Benedict was President then Governor of Rhode Island for 11 years and with Roger Williams a trusted interpreter of the American Indian language. While looking for information on Christiana Peake Arnold, Benedict’s mom, I found a book, ‘The burying place of Governor Arnold’ by Alice Brayton about the establishment, destruction and restoration of the Governor’s burial grounds. Images are from this book. It’s in the public domain, an ebook at HathiTrust.

Alice Brayton of Newport, “In the spring of 1946 as I was walking down Pelham Street in Newport, Rhode Island, I saw a dozen people and a red flag in front of a dilapidated late nineteenth century cottage. It was an auction. The house was for sale. “How about the land behind the house Is it included?” “Yes, the house and the land behind the house.” “But the land behind the house, they tell me, is the burying place of Governor Arnold and his family. You can’t auction off a burying ground. It isn’t decent.” (It isn’t even legal in Rhode Island, as I found out later.) However, I bid in the house and the land behind the house. In this casual fashion I acquired Governor Arnold’s graveyard”.

Benedict Arnold wrote in 1675, “I order that my kindred relations may as they die be buried at convenient distance about my grave.” For a time Arnold and his family were buried in this cemetery then it was kind of forgotten. In 1901 a report was presented on the condition of the site, with nothing done and when Alice Brayton came along in the 1940s the site was “desolation and tin cans”.

Arnold, Benedict Newport home

Newport the seat of the Honorable Benedict Arnold

The book has b&w photos from the 1940s and stories of the family. Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries has full color photos. Originally Benedict and Damaris’s headstones had large plaques or stones, those are long gone. Photo of the cemetery today at Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries.


Brayton, Alice. The Burying Place of Governor Arnold, Newport, R.I.: Privately printed, 1960.

Page 19 Rhode Island. Commissioner to inquire into the condition of the Benedict Arnold burial place, and James N. (James Newell) Arnold.Report of J. N. Arnold, Commissioner to Inquire Into the Present Condition of the Governor Benedict Arnold Burial Place, And the Title Thereto. Providence: E. L. Freeman & Sons, 1901

Ephraim Child b. 1593

Ephraim 11th great uncle on RootsMagic tree.
Ephraim was born in 1593 in Nayland, Suffolk, England. At age 13 he was a tailor apprentice. Snap shot shows A Register of the Scholars Admitted Into Merchant Taylor’s School, Volume 1 page 50, list 1605 at HathiTrust.

screenshot.png

On February 8, 1624 at age 31 he married Elizabeth Bond, a widow, hey didn’t have children and lived in Nayland, England until 1630 when they sailed for America with the Winthrop Fleet, on Wikipedia. “The Winthrop Fleet was a well-planned and financed expedition that formed the nucleus of the Massachusetts Bay Colony”. Letters of Ephraim and John Winthrop survive in the volumes of Winthrop Journals.
Pages 165-168 Ephraim’s letters to John Winthrop.

Ephraim and the 700 other passengers of the fleet landed in Salem. Ephraim went to Watertown where he was a freeman in 18 May 1631. He was actively involved in the new colony as a commissioner to end small causes, keeper of the town books, auditor and selectmen. He held selectmen meetings at his home. He owned lots of lands: uplands, marsh, lowland, Remote Meadow, Hither Plain, Great Dividend and more.

His will was dated 20 November 1662, proved 2 April 1663. He left lands, money and possessions to his widow and his Bond and Child nephews. To the Watertowne schoolmaster he left 40 shillings annually. His inventory was dated 12 February 1662. The inventory included all his lands, livestock, farm buildings, tools, wearing apparel, 2 silver cups, 12 silver spoons and a lot more.


Volume 1 page 50. A register of the scholars admitted into Merchant Taylor’s School, from A.D. 1562 to 1874, list 1605 Oct. Ephraim Child s. of Wolston cit. and cordwayner, decd., b. Feb 1596. Merchant Taylors School on Wikipedia- it’s like Hogworts with houses and colors- opened in 1551, and is still a private day school in a different location from when Ephraim was a student.

Volume 1 fifth series page 165. Winthrop, Adam. The Winthrop Papers Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1871

Jospeh Jenckes b. 1656

Jospeh Jenckes 10th great uncle on RootsMagic tree.
Joseph was born in Pawtucket. Rhode Island in 1656. His father and grandfather, both named Joseph, were well known in area. His grandpa built the first American Fire Engine, ever, and designed a first coin, the Pine Tree silver shilling. His dad was a founder of Pawtucket, RI and built the iron works and mill there.
Joseph got busy in his local government early on, held lots of town positions: a surveyor of land, state auditor, deputy governor, speaker of the deputies, assistant governor, then 19th Governor of Rhode Island from 1727 to 1732.

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Proceedings of the General assembly held for the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations at Newport the first Wednesday in May 1727. The following officers were declared and elected and duly engaged. Records of the Colony of Rhode Island at Archive.org

One of his first jobs as governor was a meeting with King Charles II to discuss land boundaries of Rhode Island and Connecticut, a big issue in Colonial America. Later on Governor Jenckes wrote letters to King George II. Several respected sources state that he was 7 feet tall, a giant in his time. “Mr. Jenks [senior] was ancestor of a rather remarkable line. Joseph Jenks, Governor of Rhode Island from 1727 to 1732, and who was not only applauded for his executive ability but renowned for his personal appearance, being seven feet and two inches tall”. Volume 2 page 159. History of Lynn, Essex county, Massachusetts by Newhall, 1865

Joseph and his first wife Mary Brown had 9 children. After Mary’s death Joseph married Alice Smith, granddaughter of John Smith the miller of Rhode Island and 10th great grandfather of Elizabeth Speedy Roose. Jospeh and Alice didn’t have kids.


Governor Jenckes to George II letter. Volume 4 page 393. Rhode Island. Records of the Colony of Rhode Island, Providence : A. C. Greene and Brothers, state printers, 1856.

Governor Jenckes photo is on several websites, including Find a Grave, but with no source. Same photo is at Wikipedia, different format.

Joseph Jenckes, governor on Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Jenckes_(governor)

Jospeh appointed Governor. Volume 4 page 387. Rhode Island. Records of the Colony of Rhode Island, Providence : A. C. Greene and Brothers, state printers, 1856.