David Gaines and Prudence Risley b. 1732

David Gaines and Prudence Risley 6th great parents on RoostMagic tree

David Gaines was born on June 25, 1732 in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Prudence Risley was born September 26, 1735 in the same place. The Gaines family had been in America since 1637, the Risley family since 1633, both families arrived from England.

David  married Prudence in 1754 in Glastonbury, CT. They had 5 sons and 2 daughters, the family moved north from Glastonbury, Connecticut to Northfield, Massachusetts to Guilford, Vermont.  Guilford is on the Vermont and Massachusetts border, southern Vermont in between … Sweet Pond and Satan’s Kingdom … One source states the Gaines farm was “near the state line”.  Guilford was the biggest town in Vermont from 1791-1820, today it’s population is about 2000.

David’s dad Nathaniel died in 1755 David and his brothers inherited land, David signed the will. The Gaines family was on the 1790 US Federal Census, the first federal census. The 2020 US Census was the 24th, run every 10 years.  On this first census one name, the head of house is recorded. Others in the house were recorded by age and gender. In the snapshot column 1 is males 16 and older,  column 2 males younger than 16, column 3 is all females.  David Gaines is 2nd in the snapshot, Joseph Gaines is at the bottom. 

Sons David and Joseph each married a Tubbs sister. David married Elizabeth, Joseph married Abigail Tubbs. Joseph and Abigail’s son Obed Gaines went west to Iowa where his granddaughter Mary Ella Gaines married James Miller, they’re the grandparents of Faber Miller, my grandpa.

David died July 31, 1813 and Prudence died April 15 1816. They are buried in Maplehurst Cemetery in Guilford- with matching headstones. Gaines family burials are 32 of the 235 burials in this small country cemetery.

Sources

  • 1790 United States census at FamilySearch.org
  • Find a grave memorials 21747459 and 21747457
  • The New England historical and genealogical register 1931 Volume 85
  • Vermont Vital Records, 1760-1954 at FamilySearch.org
  • Guilford , Vermont map at Google

Andrew Howlett and Margaret b. 1726

Andrew Howlett and Margaret 6th great grandparents on RootsMagic tree.

Andrew Howlett was born around 1726. Margaret  -last name unknown, was born around the same time. Both their birthplaces, their parents names aren’t known. Andrew and Margaret  married in 1747 and had 2 sons and 5 daughters, all born in Maryland. It’s likely Andrew fought in the American Revolution. In 1778 he, son James and son in law Henry Crooks all pledged an Oath of Fidelity. At that time men over 16 were required to take this oath, pledging their loyalties to America and not to the King of England. 

Oath of Fidelity and Support
“I do sware I do not hold myself bound to yield any Allegience or obedience to the King of Great Britain his heirs or Successors and that I will be true and faithful to the State of Maryland and will to the utmost of my power, Support maintain and defend the Freedom and Independence thereof and the Government as now established against all open enemies and secret and traterous Conspriaces and will use my utmost endeavours to disclose and make known to the Governor or some one of the Judges or Justices thereof all Treasons or Treaterous Consperaces, attempts or Combinations against this State or the Government thereof which may come to my Knowledge so help me God.”

Andrew and family are on the 1790 US census in Harford County, Maryland, a family of six. In 1800, same location, with a family of seven.  Andrew made two land purchases in 1774: 15 acres which he named Howlett’s Triangle and 60 acres named Howlett’s Ambition.  In 1776 the Howletts lived in an area called Broad Creek Hundred- total population in 1776 was 342 people. An 1803 court record mentions the road “from William Ashmore’s mill for three or four miles towards the Pennsylvania line, near to the dwelling-house of a certain Andrew Howlett, has been found to be convenient and useful to the public”. The court ordered the road on Andrew’s farm be kept up, in good repair for the people.

Margaret died before April 30, 1809 when Andrew wrote his will. Youngest son John got all the lands. Andrew left his daughter and granddaughters money. John Howlett and son in law George Leamon were executors, the will was settled in 1810. Andrew’s inventory included 1 male slave, 17 years old, there in Maryland in 1810.

Sources

Elizabeth Hibshman b. 1740

Elizabeth Hibshman 6th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Elizabeth Hibshman was born around  1740 in Ephrata, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. Her parents John and Anna were both recent immigrants from Switzerland.  Elizabeth’s  brothers Henrich and Wendell both fought in the American Revolution.

Elizabeth married Conrad Meinzer and they had 4 daughters and 3 sons, all baptized at the local Lutheran church. They farmed and by 1789 owned – and paid taxes on  200 acres of land, 2 horses and 3 cows.

Elizabeth was a widow in 1781, her husband Conrad’s will names Elizabeth and each of their children “From said income my wife shall educate my children. My sons shall be obedient to their mother but each of said sons shall be free of his mother when fourteen years of age provided he intends to learn a trade. I order that in four weeks after my death all my personal estate shall be sold except my bed, a wardrobe, the best cow which I bequeath to my wife.” 

Pennsylvania, U.S., Compiled Marriage Records, 1700-1821 at Ancestry

On October 7, 1783 Elizabeth married Peter Zeller, they stayed in the area of Lancaster County Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth and Conrad’s daughter Fronica married Mathias Druckenbrod, whose son Samuel married Maria Menser and went to Ohio in 1850 and  they had a son Samuel. This son Samuel married Elizabeth Bair and their daughter Fiana in 1875, in Ohio married William Miller. William and Fiana moved to Bremer County, Iowa near Waverly.

Sources

  • Biographical Annals of Lebanon County at HathiTrust
  • Pennsylvania, U.S., Compiled Marriage Records, 1700-1821 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993

Harm Roos b. 1824

Harm Roos 2nd great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Harm Janssen Roos was born on December 12, 1824  in East Fresia, Ostfriesland, Germany. His parents were Jan Roos and Meenke Schroder. Harm had seven siblings his brother Garbrand  is the great grandpa of Stanley Roose. Harm married Maarje Tellinghuisen in  1849 in Germany. They came to America in the 1860s and went straight to Ogle County, Illinois. Already set up there was a big German American community from the Ostfriesland area.  

U.S., Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918 at Ancestry

Harm was a farmer. He and Maarje had 4 sons and 3 daughters. Maarje died in 1896, Harm married Lammechien Takens on July 14, 1898, they had no kids. A 1893 land map shows Harm owned about 300 acres of land, his bother Andrew owned land nearby. Harm , his family and friends were Lutherans . In a history of Ebenezer Reformed Church in Ogle, Illinois, “Starting around 1849, immigrants began settling. After 1855 German immigrants increased, many from Ostfriesland. Families from the Ostfriesland area were invited into the home of Harm Roos for a time of worship and singing. After some time, the group grew so large they could no longer fit in the log cabin home.” The church group bought an unused school building and set up an official church. Harm lived to age 80 and is buried in Ebenezer Cemetery in Oregon, Ogle County, Illinois. “For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.” Philippians 1:21 is inscribed on his grave, in German.

A snapshot of Harm and Johann Roos, cousins via FamilySearch

Harm’s oldest son John Roos was about the same age as his cousin Johann Roos youngest son of Garbrand, great grandpa of Stanley Roose. John and Johann grew up together in Ogle, Illinois. When Johann was 15 he and his family moved to Grundy County, Iowa, near Aplington,  200 miles west. It’s likely that John and Johann stayed in touch, maybe their wives traded letters and maybe the 2 Roos cousins got together in Iowa or Illinois in the 1860s, middle aged men with families.

Sources

  • Ebenezer Reformed Church History online
  • Illinois county marriages 1810-1940 database at FamilySearch
  • U.S., Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918 at Ancestry
  • Find a grave memorial 28532306 photo “Added by:  Tombstone Tourist on 17 Jul 2018”
  • Germany, Lutheran Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1500-1971 at Ancestry.

George Harter b. 1764

George Harter 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

George Harter, also known as John George, was born June 3, 1764 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. His parents Mathias Harter and Anna Schuler were born in Pennsylvania too, their ancestors were from Germany.

George married Elizabeth Bowman around 1790 in Pennsylvania. George and Elizabeth had 9 kids. George farmed and inherited farm land from his dad and from his father in law Abraham Bowman. “Early in the spring of 1806 the family of George Harter started from Beaver [Township, PA] in a six-horse wagon for their new home in Ohio”. They traveled 325 miles west to Stark County, Ohio.

The Harter, Bowman, Bair, Druckenbrod and Miller families moved together from Pennsylvania to Ohio with thousands of other families as the American west opened up. Ohio was a state in 1803, George and family arrived 3 years later. In 1809 the first election was held on the first Monday in April at the house of George Harter in Stark County. George Harter was a Jacksonian Democrat, he wanted equal protection for all [all circa 1809], no ‘moneyed aristocracy’, and supported the community’s goals over an individual’s goals.

George Harter’s inventory 1833

George Harter died June 7, 1833 in Stark County. His wife lived 30 more years. George Harter’s estate was settled Monday August 5, 1833. There’s a five page record with an inventory, debts owed to George Harter and items sold at auction. The inventory included: a mantle clock, a German Bible, an atlas of geography, 1 lot of books, a looking glass, 4 forks, 1 windmill, a black mare and a side saddle.

Sources

Grace Child b. 1689

Grace Child 7th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Grace was born October 27, 1689 in Roxbury, Massachusetts to Benjamin Child and Grace Morris. Grace’s ancestors came to America from England and Wales in the early 1620-40s. Grace married Timothy Walker on May 14, 1713. Grace’s sister Mary married Timothy’s brother Peter Walker. in 1715. The Walker family ancestors were early colonial immigrants too. Grace and Timothy had 6 children, 5 daughters and a son. Grace and her family belonged to the original church in Rehoboth, today it’s the Newman Congregational Church, they practice and preach “radical hospitality”, established in 1624.

Grace died October 30, 1729, she was 40 years old and is buried at Newman Cemetery, a mile or so north of the Walker House where she and her family lived.

Snapshot of Grace Child’s ancestors, Ancestry family tree

Timothy started building the Walker House in 1724. The house is still there, open for tours and a house study site. Just announced at the site, it will be a farm again in Spring 2021. “When Philip Walker [Timothy Walker’s grandpa] died in 1679 his estate included 177 acres of land,” said Val Talmage, executive director of PRI. “By 1891, the farmland associated with the antique dwelling was 96 acres. And by 1960, the land was reduced to the current configuration of just over one acre. It’s so exciting that this most significant historic place will once again be a productive farm.”

Source

Timothy Walker b. 1687

Timothy Walker 7th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Timothy Walker was born on September 14, 1687 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts to Samuel and Martha Ide Walker. Timothy’s 4 grandparents came to America from England in the 1630-40s. Timothy was the 3rd generation to live on his family’s farm. He had an older brother and 4 younger sisters.

On May 6, 1713 Timothy published his intention of marriage to Grace Child and they married on May 14th. Grace and Timothy lived on the Walker family farm. In Rehoboth, Timothy farmed and worked at the family sawmill and inherited both when his dad and his brother both died in 1812. The farm and sawmill are long gone but at 432 Massasoit Ave., East Providence, RI the house Timothy built is still there: The Walker House. Timothy was a widow in 1729 and married 2nd wife Rachel Beverly on January 15, 1730. Timothy wrote his will in November 1744 and died in 1745. The will is 32 pages, it includes his children’s names, an inventory and his signature. Timothy is buried at Newman Cemetery about 1 mile from the Walker House, his house.

The Walker House is on land Timothy’s dad Samuel Walker inherited from his dad Philip Walker. The Walker House stayed in the family until 1812 and was donated to Preserve Rhode Island in 1984. “At the time of its erection it was considered a marvel of architecture. North of the house were apple orchards and outbuildings, including a barn, shed, carriage house, and chicken house.”

Philip Walker House building began in 1724

Major updates were completed in 2008 by Preserve Rhode Island, ‘The Statewide Advocate for Rhode Island’s Historic Places’. Today Timothy Walker’s house is a study house, “for architectural history and historic preservation students, who can benefit from first-hand observations of architectural features”. The website has photos, a field study PDF and an orientation packet PDF, 10 pages of detail about the house, its history and the Walker family. Virtual visit: https://www.preserveri.org/walker-house

Sources

Conrad Meinzer b. 1734

Conrad Meinzer 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Conrad was born in Baden, Germany on May 21, 1734 and baptized there the next day. In 1751 Conrad was 17 years old and sailed to Pennsylvania where he joined a German American community in Lancaster County. It’s likely that Conrad’s parents Johann and Catherine Weil Meinzer sailed on the same ship, possibly a brother too. After arriving in Pennsylvania, men 16 and older all made an oath to the King, like a pledge of allegiance. “ .. in hopes and expectation of finding a retreat and peaceable settlement therein, Do solemnly promise and engage, that we will be faithful and bear true allegiance to His present Majesty, King George The Second, and His successors, kings of Great Britain”.

Conrad married Elizabeth HIbshman in 1760. Her family came from Switzerland. Conrad and Elizabeth had 7 children, who were baptized at the local Lutheran church. Pennsylvania tax records show Conrad’s taxes for 1772, 1773 and 1779. In 1772 he was taxed on 100 acres of woodland, 2 horses and 2 cows. In 1773, taxed on 130 acres of land, 2 horses, 3 cows, 5 sheep and in 1779, taxed on 200 acres, 3 horses, 8 cows.

In April 1777 Conrad is on Mathias Harter’s land deed. The deed list neighbors: Benjamin Bowman and Conrad Meinzer. The Meinzer, Harter and Bowman families would all move together to Stark County, Ohio where Conrad’s 2nd great granddaughter Fiana Druckenbrod married William Miller. Fianna and William moved to Waverly, Iowa

Conrad wrote a will and his estate was settled on August 10, 1781. The will isn’t in his writing, the image shows a handwritten copy made by a clerk. Conrad’s will named his wife and children and he left his best cow to his wife.

Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records at Ancestry

Summarized: In the name of God amen. I Conrad Meinzer being very sick but of good senses, thanks be to God. My wife Elizabeth shall have all the use and income of the lands till my eldest son John is at lawful age the same to my son in law Michael Oberle. From said income my wife shall educate my children. My sons shall be obedient to their mother but each of said sons shall be free of his mother when fourteen years of age provided he intends to learn a trade. I order that in four weeks after my death all my personal estate shall be sold except my bed, a wardrobe, the best cow which I bequeath to my wife. From the money arising my debts shall be paid and the residue shall be dispersed. All my lands shall be divided into six plots the share that I live on at present shall be appointed to my son John and the other six shares to Catharina, Anna, Maria, Verona, Frederick and Conrad until all of my heirs are made equal.

Sources

Deborah Bell b. 1650

Deborah Bell 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Deborah Bell was born on November 29, 1650 in Boston. Her dad and mom were Thomas and Anna Bell who migrated from England separately, met then married in Boston around 1640. Thomas Bell was one of Boston’s public executioners. Deborah had 7 siblings: John, Joan, Tabitha, Thomas, Hopestill, Moremercy and Joseph.

1670 Stonington census

Deborah married James York on January 19, 1669, probably in Boston. They moved to New London, Connecticut where they were on the 1670 census with 42 other families. Deborah’s brother Thomas Bell and James’s dad James York Sr. were on the census too. They founded a church, The First Congregational Church of Stonington, James Noyes the first pastor is on that same 1670 census. The church is still there today, organized in 1674 it was rebuilt after a fire in 1829. On June 16, 1678 Goodwife York was admitted to the church.

In New London, Deborah and James had 7 children. Deborah was widow in 1676 at age 26. She married Henry Elliot and they had 5 more children. Deborah and Henry Elliot’s marriage is recorded in a diary of the time, “… It was in the 5 day of March 78-79 mrs bruster was buried the 12 day father avery was buried: Henry Eliot was here to be maried Curtice brought the wine,.”

Sources

Prudence Heath b. 1597

Prudence Heath 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Prudence was born in Ware, Hertfordshire, England and baptized there on November 6, 1597. Her parents were William and Agnes Cheney Heath. The town of Ware is 30 miles north of London, it’s as old as the Roman Empire from 55 B.C. The Heath family’s church was St Mary’s Parish, still there today.

In 1622 Prudence married Edward Morris, he was also from Ware. They were married in London, on Friday, October 25 at St Mary Mounthaw a parish church “in Old Fish Street Hill”. This church was destroyed in The Great Fire, started in a London bakery on September 2, 1666 and spread fast through the city. Mayor, Sir Thomas Bloodworth ignored the fire or didn’t realize the seriousness and by the time he acted it was a firestorm that lasted 5 days, destroyed one third of London and left 100,000 without homes. “The social and economic problems created by the disaster were overwhelming”. Even though the church burned, and was never rebuilt, a register record with Prudence and Edward’s marriage of 1622 survives.

Marriage in London 1622

Prudence and Edward had 4 children, all born in Ware, all left for America. Prudence and Edward both died in their 30s, Edward in 1631, Prudence in 1632. Around this time Prudence’s bothers William and Issac left for America and Prudence’s kids did too. Daughter Elizabeth migrated in 1635, she was 11 and was a servant to George Giddings. Son Isaac migrated the same year, he was with the Ruggles family and age 9. Youngest son Edward Morris (7th great grandpa of Elizabeth Speedy) stayed in Ware until 1651 then left for America to join his family there.

Sources