Rebecca Gaines b. 1688

Rebecca Gaines 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Rebecca was born in Connecticut in 1688 or so, one of 10 children of Samuel and Anna Burnham Gaines. On August 1, 1704 Rebecca married Samuel Risley in Hartford, Connecticut where they set up a home. Around 1710 Rebecca’s mom deeded land to Rebecca’s husband, “Anna Gaines of Hartford, widow, for 30 shillings, conveys to her son-in-law, Samuel Risley of Hartford, all her right and interest in land formerly sold to her father, Thomas Burnham, late of Hartford, by the Indian sachem Totonimo, which lands are undivided among the children of Thomas Burnham, [Signed] Anna Gaines, her mark..

Rebecca was a widow in 1752. In her husband’s will, “I give and bequeath to my Beloved Wife Rebecca one hundred and fifty pounds out of my moveable Estate old Tennor and also ye free use and improvement of ye one half of my dwelling house and cellar and three acres of land by said house as long as she shall Remain my widow.”

There’s no date, no record for Rebecca’s death and her burial place is unknown. She was a widow at 68, probably died fairly soon after her husband. He has a headstone at Old Eastbury Cemetery in Glastonbury. Rebecca is probably right by him.

Sources

Sarah Bulkeley b. 1640

Sarah Bulkeley 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Sarah was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1640 to Thomas and Sarah Jones Bulkeley. Both grandpas were pastors, VIPs of their time, their writings, lives, arrival, all documented in detail. In 1640s Concord there was trouble, disagreements about religion, Sarah’s grandpas were on opposite sides. Sarah’s family was one of several that followed Pastor Jones and joined Pastors Davenport and Eaton in New Haven, Connecticut. Sarah’s dad Thomas was in his dad Peter’s will so even though Thomas chose the Jones side instead of the Bulkeley side he was still family. Sarah married Eleazer Brown in 1663, they had 7 children and stayed in New Haven. Sarah’s mom died in 1683, her will left books to her daughter Sarah: Graham’s Works 3 vols. Walker’s God’s Providence, and A View of False Christianity.
Sarah and Eleazer were most likely buried in what is no the Center Church on the Green Churchyard. This burial place has changed over the years, their headstones aren’t there anymore. There’s a memorial plaque at the site. “From the Settlement of New Haven 1638 to 1796 the adjoining ground was occupied as a common place of burial the a new burying ground was opened and divided into family lots and city squares. In 1813 this church was placed over the monuments of several whose names are engraved on tablets in the vestibule. In 1821 the remaining monuments were by consent of survivors and under direction of the city removed to the new ground. In a moment in the twinkling of an eye at the last trump.(et) The dead shall be raised”.  The current church has a crypt, in the basement burials and headstones and they offer tours and a few photos here: https://centerchurchonthegreen.org/history/crypt/ .

Sources

Samuel Hill b. 1652

Samuel Hill 8th great grandpa on RoostMagic

Samuel was born in 1652 in Malden, Massachusetts son of Joesph Hill and second wife Hannah Smith. Joseph, his dad, was well known in Malden: a lawyer, town rep, deputy etc. Samuel fought in King Philips war between 1675-79 in Captain Brocklebank’s command and may have been a Sergeant. On May 20, 1679 in Newbury, Massachusetts on the coast, about 40 miles northeast of Malden, Samuel married Abigail Wheeler.

Hills, Samuel and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

Samuel Hill and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

They stayed in Newbury and had more than 10 children. On August 5, 1732 Samuel was 80 years and wrote his will. ‘Weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, the mortality of my body … give and command my soul to the hands of God that give it’.  Samuel’s will mentioned his wife Abigail, then listed his children. His inventory included silver, books, armor, pewter, earthenware, Indian and English corn, barrels and casks and Cooper’s tools to make barrels and casks. Samuel is buried in Bridge Street Cemetery in Newbury his headstone is still there.

Sources

Lydia Parrish b. 1687

Lydia Parrish 8th great grandma on RootsMagic

Lydia was born in Groton, Massachusetts on April 20, 1687, the daughter of John Parrish and his 2nd wife Mary Wattles.

Parrish, Lydia 1687 birth register

Lydia’s family moved from Groton to Ipswich, Massachusetts, then to Preston, Connecticut. In Preston on May 20, 1705 Lydia married Christopher Tracy. Lydia’s brother Benjamin married Mary Tracy and Lydia’s sister Sarah married David Tracy, David and Mary were siblings of Christopher. The Tracy and Parrish families all stayed in the Preston, New London Connecticut area. Lydia and Christopher had 9 children. Lydia was a widow in 1725 and the executor of her husband’s estate. After her husband’s death Lydia probably lived with a daughter and family, and probably died around 1745.

Sources

Martha Ide b. 1656

Martha Ide 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Martha was born October 1656 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. At HathiTrust, page 649 Martha and siblings births in Vital record of Rehoboth. She was a middle child of Nicholas and Martha Bliss Ide, both born in England then living in Plymouth Colony by 1636. Martha would have lived on a farm and once old enough helped her mom with any number of jobs for most of the day. Martha married Samuel Walker in 1681, after the end of King Philips War -her husband was in that war. She and Samuel had at least 6 children and lived where The Philip Walker House is today: 432 Massasoit Ave East Providence, RI 02914.

Philip Walker House, East Providence, RI

Philip Walker House built in 1724

The house was known as the 2nd oldest in Rhode Island and it was accepted that Philip Walker and son Samuel built it in late 1670 or 80. Recent research shows the house was built with “mill sawn timbers” chopped down in 1724. Philip Walker owned the land, passed down to Philip’s son Samuel, then to Samuel and Martha’s son Timothy who built the house in 1724. The house is almost 300 years old and still standing. At Philip Walker House at Preserve Rhode Island the house is part of a study project.

Philip Walker House at Wikipedia

Margaret Denison b. 1657

Margaret Denison 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Margaret was born in 1657 in Connecticut. Her dad George’s family came to America in the 1630s from Hertfordshire, England. Margaret was the 8th of 9 kids and ‘the only one to marry outside of Stonington and move away’. Margaret married James Brown on June 5, 1678 in Swansea, Massachusetts then they moved to Barrington, Massachusetts, now part of Rhode Island, on the Providence River. Margaret and James may have had 12 kids.

Both Margaret and husband James’s wills survive and are printed in the Mayflower Descendent series. Margaret mentions her children including daughter Ann who married Samuel Hill. Margaret’s husband is the Mayflower Descendent: LIEUT. JAMES BROWN3, son of James and Lydia2 (Howland) Brown and grandson of John1 Howland of The Mayflower”.

Margaret Denison Brown is buried in Ancient Little Neck Cemetery in East Providence, Rhode Island. Her headstone inscription: In memory of Mrs. Margaret Brown Relict of Lieut James Brown, Who died on the 5th Day of May 1741 in ye 85th year of her age.

Denison, Margaret will snapshot

Widow Margaret Brown’s will 1733/4

At Archive.org. Page 24 Captain George and Lady Ann; the Denisons of Pequotsepos Manor, Margaret’s marriage.

At HathiTrust Their wills The Mayflower descendant, Volume 17 page 193 several pages.

Rhode Island historic cemetery database. Denison, Margaret ID 97022 Ancient Little Neck Burial Ground.

Mary Williams b. 1683

Mary Williams 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Mary Williams was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1683, the oldest child of Daniel and Rebecca Rhodes Williams. In 1709 Mary and Epenetus Olney married. They would have lived in the Stone Ender home Epenetus began building in 1702 or so. The Stone Ender home stayed in the Olney family from the time it was built till it was demolished around 1898. Mary and Epenetus had 9 children: James, Charles, Joseph, Anthony, Mary, Amy, Ann, Martha, and Freeborn. The family lived on a farm: “Here was raised in those early days beans. “turnops”. “wheate”, Indian corn. rye. “flex”, while in the orchard, through which passed the road leading to the Providence settlement, there were “Apple and peach tree, fruited deep”.

The current address for their farm is 370 Woonasquatucket Avenue, Centerdale, Providence County, RI. The farm and home stood for almost 200 years on the banks of the Woonasquatucket River about 6 miles northeast of Providence 41°50’45.1″N 71°28’37.5”W.

370370 Woonasquatucket Avenue Olney site

ON the banks of the Woonasquatucket River in Rhode Island

Roger Williams Family Association online: Genealogy, Daniel Williams, 27 i. Mary3 Williams, m. Epenetus Olney Jr. Mary and Epenetus’s daughter Martha is the mom of Marrtha Angell the mom of Asa Angell the dad of Dexter Angell the dad of Delia Angell the mom of Matilda Flood the mom of Philippa Mockford the mom of Elizabeth Speedy.

Olney’s Stone ender home at Library of Congress 

At Archive. org. A genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England Volume 3 page 313.

At HathiTrust. Early Rhode Island houses: Isham, Norman Morrison, 1864-1943, plate 33.  State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Volume 3 page 627 – 630.

Hannah Judd b. 1681

Hannah Judd 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Hannah was a middle child of Benjamin and Mary Lewis Judd. She was born, then baptized on March 13, 1681 in Farmington, Connecticut.

Judds and Smiths 1700 CT records

Marriage of Gershom and Hannah, children’s births

On May 4 1710 Hannah married Gershom Smith he was from nearby Glastonbury, Connecticut. Gershom and Hannah’s records show only 2 kids: Hannah the oldest and Gershom a son who died at 16. The Smith family stayed in Glastonbury. Gershom died in 1747 at age 67 and is buried there. Widow Smith (Hannah) moved to her daughter’s home. Hannah’s daughter, also Hannah, was married to Richard Risley and living in Tolland, Connecticut about 30 miles northeast.

Hannah is on a land record dated 1756: “On 3 Nov. 1756, Richard and Hannah Risiey, with Widow Hannah Smith, all of Glastonbury, sold land where said Risley now dwells”. Hannah was 75. There’s no record of her death or burial. Husband Gershom has a headstone at Glastonbury, Hannah may be buried there or may be buried in Tolland with her daughter’s Risley family.

Sources
At American Ancestors. The American genealogist volume 25 page 130. New England marriages to 1700 database Volume 2 page 1391.

At FamilySearch.org. Connecticut Marriages, 1640-1939 FHL 001316154 Digital Folder 007730404 Image 00087 (87 of 784) marriage of Gershom and Hannah, children’s births

 

John Connable b. 1650

John Connable 8th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Connable was born in England about 1650 or so. An Ancestry source “US Craftperson Files 1600-1995” shows his occupation as carpenter, joiner, artisan. This craftsman source leads to a 30 page paper “The Seventeenth Century Case Furniture of Essex County, Massachusetts, and Its Makers”. Author Benno Forman researched ‘the origins of the joined chest of drawers’ in early America. The conclusion, “only one man John Cunnable could have brought this style to Boston’. The author includes the ‘Garvan’ chest at Yale’s Art Gallery as evidence.

Connable chest of drawers

The Garvan chest at Yale

Connable, John joiner

Then only one man, John Connable, could have brought the style to New England.

Connable, John signature

John Cunabell, joiner of London

Besides his skills in woodworking John married 3 times, had a large family, fought in King Philips War, took the Oath of Allegiance, was a freeman and for several years a ’tithing man’ responsible for arresting travelers on Sunday – travel was forbidden on the Sabbath.

His death is recorded in a diary of the time, “10. On ye 10 in ye morning about 5 old Mr. Connabell, ye joiner, dyed and buryed on ye 13 day aged 74 years 3 months 15 days”.

Online
The Garvan chest at Yale Art Gallery

The article Seventeenth Century Case Furniture
image 14 of 31
Catalog page http://www.jstor.org/stable/1180998?origin=JSTOR-pdf

“The drawers of the Garvan chest and the SPNEA chest (fig. to), in contrast to those in all the joined furniture known to have been made elsewhere in Massachusetts before 1675, are held together with dovetails, as opposed to the usual, rural Anglo-American technique of nailing flushcut drawer sides into rabbets planed into the sides of the drawer fronts”

At Archive.org
Volume 15 page 201 Diary of Jeremiah Bumstead of Boston 1722-1727 in The New England historical and genealogical register 1861 Volume 15.

At Ancestry
U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995

At HathiTrust
Volume 1 page 9 several pages. Genealogical memoir of the Cunnabell, Conable or Connable family.

Sarah Cloyes b. 1666

Sarah Cloyes 8th great grandmother on RootsMagic tree

Sarah was born to Peter Cloyes and Hannah Littlefield probably in 1666, probably in Wells, Maine. In 1688 Sarah married John Connable in Salem, Massachusetts. Sarah and John Connable were in Boston shortly after their marriage, their children were born in Boston: 6 daughters and a son, Samuel. Sarah died young at about 36. Her burial place is unknown.

Connable, John and Sarah Cloyes 1688 marriage

John and Sarah are No. 23 at bottom of list. Massachusetts town clerk vital and town records 1626 – 2001 database at FamilySearch.org

A Google search for Sarah Cloyes will bring up Sarah’s 2nd mom (Peter Cloyes’s 2nd wife) Sarah Towne Cloyes, she and Peter married in about 1683 both widows with children. Sarah’s 2nd mom, Sarah Towne, was the youngest of the three Towne sisters accused of witchcraft in Salem. Sarah Towne’s 2 older sisters, Mary Towne Eastey 58 and Rebecca Towne Nurse 71, were hung. Sarah escaped jail, maybe with the help of husband Peter Cloyes.

Ann Putnam was 13 in 1692 when she accused 62 women in Salem. 20 of those women were hanged, several others died while in prison. In 1706 Ann was 27 and made a public apology for her part in the trials, and especially for the grief and loss she caused the Towne families. The Towne families accepted the apology. If you read Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown or watch Arthur Miller’s The Crucible you’ll recognize the characters Goody Cloyse and Rebecca Nurse.

screenshot

Ancestry tree snapshot: Peter his wife Hannah, their child Sarah Cloyes her husband John and Peter’s 2nd wife Sarah Towne.

Massachusetts town clerk vital and town records 1626 – 2001 database at FamilySearch.org. John Caniball and Sarah Cloise, 13 Mar 1688; citing Marriage, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States, town clerk offices, Massachusetts. Reference ID 44 FHL 877468 Digital Folder 007009706 Image 00425 (425 of 610

A Report of the Record Commissioners of the City of Boston 1630-1699. Volume 9 Page 184 Samuel of John and Sarah Coniball born Jan 16 [1689].

Sarah Towne’s story at Framingham History Center