Jane Partridge b. 1612

Jane Partridge 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Jane Partridge was born around 1612 in Olney, England, one of 2 children of John and Frances Partridge. Jane married Henry Gaines, also of Olney, England. By 1638 Jane, Henry and their 3 sons John, Daniel and Samuel, were in Salem, Massachusetts. The family moved to Lynn, Massachusetts where they lived on the Nahant Bay. In their times there was a small stream called Gaines Neck. Their home was near a salt marsh so they probably ‘fished’ for shrimp, mollusks, and hunted all kinds of game birds that no longer exist. Their south east view was Egg Rock a tiny island. Today Egg Rock is a bird sanctuary, it had a lighthouse for awhile.

Egg Rock, Nahant

Both Jane and Henry died fairly young, in their 30s. Jane’s will survives and shows an inventory of possessions and apprenticeships for each of her sons. John age 13 was apprenticed for seven years to Francis Dowse a shoemaker. Daniel age 11 was apprenticed for eight years to Luke Potter, a tailor in Concord. Samuel age 7 was apprenticed to Nathaniel Hanforth “who was to educate him”. Nathaniel Hanforth was also asked to oversee the money left to each of the boys and improve it if possible.

The inventory showed possessions of the family. A house and a parcel lot including upland, 8 acres of salt marsh. Several bushels of Indian corn, a featherbed, plows, blankets, clothing, one trunk, a straw hat, ten handkerchiefs, four pewter dishes, one kettle, a handsaw, a sword, a pitchfork, 3 spoons, an earthen ware pot, flax and hemp, 2 bibles, a parcel of books.

Sources

Mary Bowen b. 1635

Mary Bowen 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Mary was born in Glamorgan, Wales in 1635, a middle child of Griffin and Margaret Fleming Bowen who had at least 12 children. Glamorgan is an historic county in Wales, at the southern most edge on the Bristol Channel. Mary and her siblings, parents all sailed for America in 1638. They were in Boston and on December 6, 1638 the Bowen family joined The First Church in Boston. They lived at Muddy River on the Charles River. “On the 25th of March 1639 Mr Gryffen Bowen had a great Lot granted to him at Muddy River”. By 1648 Mary’s mom and dad sailed back to Wales, or England to live. The kids all stayed America.

Mary married Benjamin Child in Massachusetts around 1652 and they went 4 miles south to Roxbury, Massachusetts. In Roxbury Mary and Benjamin joined the First Church of Roxbury. Churches also served a meeting houses, Benjamin was one who provided money to build the church and meeting house. Mary’s sisters, their husbands were also in Roxbury.

Mary and Benjamin had 12 children between the years 1654-1673. Mary’s husband and dad died around the same time about 1678, she is mentioned in both wills. In her dad’s will, “Widow Child had a share in the distribution of Griffith Bowen’s estate.“ Mary was administrated of her husband’s estate, she provided an inventory which included the lands, livestock, 3 silver spoons and a silver cup, a feather bed, bolsters & blankets, a rug, 10 lbs. of flax, a frying pan and an iron pot.

Mary died at age 72 on Halloween 1707, “The widow Mary Child dyed the last day of October at night”. Both she and Benjamin are buried in Eliot Burying Ground in Roxbury, their headstones are long gone.

Sources

Seibelt Henrichs b. 1844

Seibelt Gerd Henrichs 4th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Seibelt “Sila” was born August 28, 1844 in Germany, probably Aurich a town in Lower Saxony, on the northern edge of Germany. Sila’s parents were Gerd and Flora Janssen Henrichs. In the family were at least 7 siblings including Henrich ‘Henry’ Henrichs great grandpa of Stanley Roose. Seibelt and Henrich’s family relationship is somewhat iffy, but is probable and once found, a DNA match will prove they are brothers. Sila’s niece Annie Antje Henrichs married Enno Frerichs, grandparents of Stanley Roose.

In Germany, Sila married Anna Itjes in 1870. On March 20, 1881 this Henrichs family sailed on the ship Leipzig from Bremen to Baltimore, Maryland. Sila, Anna and their first 4 daughters Flora or Foolke, Dena or Bernadine, Jenny or Fauken and Katie or Gretje. The family went from Baltimore to Butler County, Iowa, a journey of 1,000 miles. Most likely German American immigrants, churches? provided food and shelter, if needed, along the way.

Henrichs, Seibelt 1917 land

Sila and family on the 1895 Iowa census lived in Albion township, near Parkersburg. On the 1900 US census they were in Ripley Township, closer to Butler Center, a tiny town no longer there. Siebelt had purchased a farm, his neighbors were from Germany, Holland, Iowa, Michigan, New York. Four more daughters, Annie, Johannah, Mattie and Christina were born and Ben Hinders, also from Germany, lived with the family as a servant or farm hand. By 1900 daughter Dena had married John Classe Hoodjer, they farmed nearby and had 3 children. Other Henrichs daughter married, had families and stayed in the area except oldest daughter Flora who stayed single and daughter Hannah who died of pneumonia in her 20s.

Sila and family were members of the Ebenezer Lutheran Church along with almost all ancestors of Stanley Roose. The church is gone, was in Butler Center. A published book Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese tells the story and history of the church. On page 33, a list of baptisms at the church shows Sila’s daughter Johanna Henrichs baptized in 1888. On that same page Claus Endlemann, a future son in law and Jantje Reents, a future grandniece are also baptized.

Sila lived to age 75 and his wife Anna lived to age 96. Both are buried at Butler Center Cemetery near where Ebenezer Lutheran church used to be. Sila and Anna share a large ‘Hinrichs’ headstone and each have a smaller Mother, Father headstone with Ruhe Sanft ~ rest gently, or peacefully. Of the 22 Henrichs buried in there, 10 are of Sila’s family. Daughter Christina who married Harold Hartson, they are buried at Lynwood Cemetery in Clarksville.

Sources

  • Mission in a mile by Henry Freese published 2002.
  • United States Germans to America index 1850-1897 at FamilySearch
  • Iowa death records 1904-1951 at FamilySearch
  • Headstone photo at Find a grave, public photo, “Added by Hooked On Family 21 Apr 2014”
  • US and Iowa censuses at FamilySearch
  • Maryland, Baltimore Passenger Lists, 1820-1948 FamilySearch
  • 1917 Atlas, Jefferson Townshipat UI Iowa Digital Library

Clarissa Mockford b. 1847

Clarissa Mockford 4th great aunt on RootsMagic tree.
Clarissa was born in 1847 in Cornwall, England. In 1860 Clarissa received a graduation certificate, praising her work “very attentive and industrious”. This Victorian era certificate could have been from Sunday School or a public school. In most families -not landowning and not wealthy- kids older than 10 worked and didn’t go to school.

The certificate has these quotes running along the edge:

Honor all men, fear God, honor the King, love the brotherhood.
Love not sleep lest thou come to poverty.
Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy.
Open thine eyes and thou shalt be satisfied with bread.
Enter not in to the path of the wicked and go not in the way of evil men.  Better is little with the fear of the lord than great treasure and trouble therewith.
Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life.

Clarissa lived in Cornwall until she was 19 and in 1866 with her parents and younger siblings she sailed to America and joined older brothers Henry, great grandpa of Elizabeth Speedy, and William. Henry and William had been in America for about 10 years. In 1870 Clarissa was living in Monroe County, New York and was a dressmaker. Clarissa married James A. Edmonds, a carpenter, around 1872 and they had their first child Lena in 1874 and second child Lewis in 1877.  Clarissa and James stayed in Monroe County, NY and lived 10 miles South of Lake Ontario, 40 miles east of Niagara Falls. Lena, Clarissa and James’s daughter married William Spies at Niagara Falls on May 18, 1902. Son James Edmunds married Ada Patitillo in Los Angeles on May 24, 1918. At James’s death in 1954 their home was at 1847 S La Brea Ave about 10 miles west of the Pacific Ocean. Clarissa died in 1920, James in 1922. Both are buried at High Street Cemetery in Brockport,  Monroe County, New York.

Sources

  • England, Cornwall Parish Registers, 1538-2010 at FamilySearch
  • California, County Marriages, 1850-1952
  • Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927
  • California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-19941870
  • US census at FamilySearch
  • Certificate, Public Ancestry photo, ” JoAnna Messing originally shared this on 12 jul 2014”

Minnie Roose b. 1855

Minnie Charlotte Roose 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree.

Minnie Roose was born 12 November 1855 in Germany, a middle child of Garbrand and Catherine Renistra Roose. When Minnie was 6 years old in 1862, she sailed with her family to America. They left from Bremen, Germany and sailed on the Adler, ‘eagle’ in the English language. The Roos family docked in New York and went on to Freeport, Illinois, 900 miles west. No idea how they traveled. When they got to Freeport an established German American community welcomed them. Minnie’s youngest brother Johann, grandpa of Stanley Roose, was born in Freeport in 1865.

New York arrival 1862

Around 1876 Minnie and family were in southern Butler County, Iowa near Aplington and Parkersburg. On July 18, 1878 Minnie married Harm Haren, also from Germany. Harm and Minnie married in Grundy County and lived the remainder of their lives there, in Palermo Township, Grundy County, Iowa. Harm was a farmhand “for two years, after which he engaged in the operation of rented land until 1882 when with the capital he had acquired through industry, perseverance and economy he purchased the farm which has since been his home.” Minnie and Harm had 9 kids, 5 sons and 4 daughters. Harm died in 1918, a long life, he was 67 years old.

34 years later in 1952, Minnie was 97 years old and featured in a 75th anniversary issue of the Grundy Register, Grundy Center’s local newspaper. Minnie was the oldest resident of the area. There’s a photo and a story of her life, family.

Minnie lived another 13 years to age 109 or 110. Minnie and Harm are both buried at Fairview Cemetery in Grundy Center, Iowa.

Sources

  • New York passenger lists 1820-1891 at FamilySearch
  • The Grundy Register 1952 Jun 5 at Ancestry
  • Portrait and biographical record of Jasper, Marshall, and Grundy Counties, Iowa at HathiTrust
  • Public Ancestry photo, “ivametge originally shared this on 04 Aug 2012. Top Row L-R Henry, Otto, Claus Bottom Row L-R John, Harm, Hubert”Public Ancestry photo, “ivametge originally shared this on 04 Aug 2012. Top Row L to R_ Ella, Anna Second Row- Mae, Kathryn (Trina) Front- Minnie”
  • Public photo on FamilySearch, ” Contributed By SchwartzBarbaraHaren1 24 December 2017″

Elizabeth Frances Green b. 1809

Elizabeth Green 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth Frances Green was born in 1809 or 10 in Seaford, Sussex, England. A church, parish register shows her baptism on April 1, 1810. The handwritten record is viewable only at FamilySearch, it’s copyrighted, text reads, ” Elizabeth Frances Green, baptized 1 Apr 1810 Seaford, Sussex, England, parents Stephen Green and Mary”. Elizabeth was the 5th of 7 kids of Stephen and Mary Hoad Green. On February 13, 1830, the day before Valentine’s Day, Elizabeth married Richard Mockford of nearby Brighton, Sussex, England. In 1830 Valentine’s Day was already a thing based on Saint Valentine, a 3rd century saint.

In 1851 and 1861 Elizabeth and family were on the England censuses living on the southwestern edge of England in Budock, Cornwall, England. Elizabeth and Richard had 8 kids: 4 sons and 4 daughters. Richard was a ‘Miller, Foreman’ an advanced skill and his oldest son Henry a ‘Miller, Journeyman’ an apprenticed skill.

All of the Mockford family moved to America, not all together but over a few years. Their son Henry migrated in 1854, their son William in 1859. Elizabeth and Richard followed and by 1863 were living in the Brockport, Rochester New York area. Richard started a flour business, his sons Henry and William followed in this business. Elizabeth would have managed the home and probably was famous for making bread with fresh milled four from her family’s store.

All of the Mockford kids married and when Richard died in 1867 he and Elizabeth had at least 8 grandkids. As a widow, on the 1870 census Elizabeth was the head of house and her youngest son Edward and 2 daughters Clarissa and Emily lived with her. Clarissa was a dressmaker, Emily a milliner and Edward worked in a furnace, maybe a pottery furnace or an industrial furnace, not sure. On the 1880 US census was living with Edward, his wife Adella and their kids in Batavia, New York. Elizabeth died on June 28, 1889 and was living with he daughter Clarissa and family.

Sources

  • England Sussex parish registers 1538-1910 database copyrighted image FamilySearch
  • This could have been her view growing up in Seaford, Sussex via Google Maps https://goo.gl/maps/xQ8mY2zECawZDcoF8
  • England and Wales Census, 1851 at FamilySearch
  • 1870 United States Federal Census at Ancestry

John Kryder b. 1736

John Kryder 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in France, Germany or Pennsylvania on or around April 22, 1736, sources vary. By 1767 he was definitely in Pennsylvania where he married Ann Maria Fuchs or Fox. John and Ann had at least 5 children born between 1768 and 1775 in the area of Lancaster, PA.

John and family were part of the German American Pennsylvania community. During the American Revolution they were in the Big Runaway of 1778: “The Big Runaway was a mass evacuation in June and July 1778 of settlers from the frontier areas of what is now north central Pennsylvania during the American Revolutionary War.” The locals knew of the dangers because of the war, had requested aid: rifles, armed men from the Continental Congress, none of it arrived in time. So everyone fled with livestock and whatever possessions they could carry. Books and movies could be made about this one event, it’s huge and lasted through 1779 when the American gov’t committed more aid to “security of the frontier”.

Kryder John bacon and beef soldJohn sold bacon and beef to the Continental Army during the American Revolution. His neighbor George Marquart had the mutton and Jacob Yeiser provided the brandy. At some point John fought in the American Revolution. There’s no military records yet, but his headstones recognize his service in the American Revolution and the French Indian Wars. John has a headstone probably original from his death in 1803 and then a newer marker which his descendants set out out in 1994.

Sources

Edward Bulkeley b. 1614

Edward Bulkeley 8th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Edward was born June 17, 1614 in Odell, England to Peter and Jane Allen Bulkeley, the oldest child of 9. Edward’s dad Peter was a Puritan pastor in Odell and was harassed by Archbishop Laud, so looking to leave England. The Buckeleys sailed to America in 1634 or 1635, secretly, “No doubt the long drawn out enrollments and lack of effort to standardize spelling of the names were reflections of the family’s attempt to board the ship without being apprehended. Son Edward preceded the rest of the family, becoming a member of Boston church on 22 March 1634/5”. Archbishop Laud’s story didn’t end well, He was sent to the Tower of London, then executed in 1645. King Charles would regret putting ’too much trust in Laud’.

Bulkeley, Edward house 1967Once they were in America the Bulkeleys lived in Concord where Edward was a freeman on May 6 1635. He married Lucien, last name unknown, in 1640 and they had 6 children. Around 1660 Edward built a house in Concord, on Main Street. “А deed referring to the property, with a dwelling on it, records the 1663 transfer of 10 acres of land located on today’s Main Street to Edward Bulkeley by his mother, widow of one of Concord’s founders and its first minister, Peter Bulkeley.” Today this home is at 92 Sudbury Road in Concord, a private residence, the house was moved in the 1800s. Edward died in 1696, his wife Lucien died in 1690. They are both probably buried at Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, no headstones remain.

Edward, like his dad, was a Puritan pastor and was known for his ‘fiery’ sermons. When his dad died, Edward followed as pastor of the First Parish Church in Concord. This church is also still there in Concord, Massachusetts, now a Unitarian Universalist church. Each Sunday the congregation ends their service with this benediction:

Go out into the world in peace

Have courage

Hold on to what is good

Return to no person evil for evil

Strengthen the fainthearted

Support the weak

Help the suffering

Honor all beings

Sources

Tena Henrichs b. 1880

Tena Henrichs 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Tena or Trientje was born October 1, 1880 in Germany. At 5 years old she and her family sailed from Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, from Baltimore they traveled to Butler County, Iowa. Tena grew up in Butler County, the 2nd youngest of 5 daughters and 4 sons of Hinrich and Maria Rodenbeck Henrichs.

On February 20, 1907 Tena married John Jacobs. John also migrated from Germany with his parents and 8 siblings. Tena’s brother Fred and sister Mattie were witnesses to the marriage and included on the marriage record. Tena and John lived in Jefferson Township, Butler County Iowa, in a community of German immigrants, farmers, Lutherans. Tena and John had a daughter who died very young and 3 sons: Henry, Jacob and John. Tena’s husband John died December 16, 1916, in an automobile accident. There are no records on how or where Tena and her three young sons lived, whether they stayed on their farm or moved in with relatives.

Soldiers of the 34th Infantry DivisionMeanwhile John Jacobs’s younger bother William had enlisted in the army for World War 1. He was a private in the Minnesota 34th Engineers, with men from Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska. They trained at Camp Cody, New Mexico and were in the war until the 1920s. Marvin Cone, Iowa artist and friend of Grant Wood was in this same unit and designed the insignia. William returned from World War 1 in 1920 and Tena and William married at Ebenezer Lutheran Church on February 22, 1920.

Each of Tena’s 3 sons married, had children and farmed in the Butler County area. Oldest son Henry married Alma Constein at Vilmar Church on February 18, 1936. Tena died May 9, 1959. She was 79 years old and is buried at Butler Center Cemetery with the Jacobs and Henrichs families.

Sources

Henry Mockford b. 1831

Henry Mockford 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Henry Mockford was born on February 5, 1831 in Budock Cornwall England, the oldest of 8 children of Richard and Elizabeth Green Mockford. In Cornwall on the 1851 census Richard and son Henry are Millers and Journeyman- workers who have completed an apprenticeship considered qualified in their trade. Philippa Johns is a servant in the home. In 1853 Henry Mockford married this Philippa Johns, she was also from Cornwall.

1851 Budock England census Mockfords and PhillipaHenry, a year after his marriage, sailed to America and on the 1855 New York census he lived in Monroe County, New York, he was a servant and boarded in the home of Lucy Blodgett.  Within a year his wife and baby son William came to America too. By 1860 Henry had his own home, a next door neighbor of Lucy Blodgett and her family. On the 1860 census Henry is a Miller, his kids range from age 6 to 2 months, older brother William is also in the home. Henry and Philippa would have 7 kids total, 4 sons and 3 daughters: William born in England, and Richard, Emily, Lucy, Harry, Mary and Milton, all born in New York.

By 1872 Henry and his brother William were business owners in Hamline, New York. From the Atlas of Monroe Co., “Business Notices Mockford , Henry Propr of flouring and custom mill, Mockford, WS Propr of saw mill. Particular attention paid to custom work. Lumber constantly on hand and for sale at lowest rates”.

Mockford brothers 1872 in Hamlin, NY

Henry died in 1905. HIs obituary mentioned he worked at Johnson Harvester Company and mentioned his surviving family including children, bothers and sisters of the Monroe County, NY area except Richard Mockford who had left for Shell Rock, Iowa.

Henry and Philippa are buried in Elmwood Cemetery in  Batavia, New York.

Sources