Richard Mockford b. 1802

Richard Mockford 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Richard Mockford was born June 1, 1802 in Brighton, Sussex, England. In Brighton on February 13, 1830 Richard, a bachelor  married Elizabeth Green, a spinster. Elizabeth and Richard had 8 children. The Mockford family lived in Brighton, Sussex, then Burdock, Cornwall, England. On the England  1851 and 1861 censuses Richard was a miller.  By 1863 Richard and his wife were living in New York. They joined their sons Henry and William who had immigrated earlier. They all settled in western New York near Rochester on Lake Ontario about 30 miles east of Niagara Falls.
In 1863 Richard was on a New York tax list, “Richard Mockford of Brockport, Retail dealer, 6.67 in taxes”.

A Rochester, NY business directory from 1863 has Richard Mockford listed in the Brockport and Rochester NY sections, as a baker and flour broker. The same directory described Batavia and Brockport, both towns where Mockfords lived. Batavia was known for its ‘fine wheat’. Also in same directory: a House for Idle and Truant Children and the Rochester Home for the Friendless.

Richard died in 1867, his wife Elizabeth lived 10 more years. They both lived to see many grandchildren born in Monroe County, New York including Richard Mockford who made the 1,000 mile journey to Iowa where he married Matilda Flood and they had a child Philippa Mockford, mom of Elizabeth Speedy.

Sources

  • England Sussex parish registers 1538-1910 database. There’s an image, copyrighted and viewable at FamilySearch.org. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRP3-Z3B?i=185
  • 1863 U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 page 37 at Ancestry
  • 1851 and 1861 England census databases at FamilySearch.
  • US IRS Tax Assessment Lists 1862-1918 New York District at Ancestry. 

Martha Bliss b. 1622

Martha Bliss 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Martha was born in Daventry, England December of 1622. Her dad was Thomas, her mom Dorothy Wheatley Bliss. The Bliss family went to America around 1640, they lived in Plymouth Colony. In 1646 Martha married Nicholas Ide -this marriage is probable, has been and is debated. There’s no record of the marriage or even a record of the last name of Nicholas’s wife, but it’s probable and likely that these 2 married and had at least 10 children. Martha was called to testify in court when Elizabeth Walker, a child, was found drowned in a river by 2 boys who ran to tell Martha. All involved had to testify in court and the child’s drowning was judged an accident. The Ide and Walker families were close, husbands served on committees, children probably played together.

Court record: Rehoboth, the seauenth of August, 1664. Wee, whose names are subscribed heerto, doe heerby signify to all psons whom it may conserne, that Elizabeth Walker, the daughter of Phillip Walker, of the towne of Rehoboth, was accedentally drowned ; shee, being sent to scoole, was found alsoe accedentally in the riuer first by two youthes and they makeing knowne the same to two wemen, the wife of Nicholas Jyde and the wife of Roger Annadowne, and then to Wiliam Sabine, whoe forth with came and drew her out of the water, as hee saith. From the testimony of the afor specifyed psons, together with other concurring cercomstances, wee, the subscribers, conceiue that the child, which was two yeares and an halfe old, before specifyed, came accedentally to her end.

Sources

William Plaise b. 1571

William Plaise 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

William was born in 1571 in England. On July 19 1596 he married his first wife Margerie Smith at St. Botolphs church. The church was first built in the 1100s then rebuilt in the 1500s and again in the 1700s. It’s still there in London.

Snapshot of the parish record of their marriage, “July Anno 1596. William Plasse and Margerie Smith weare married the 19 day in Anno Domino” [?]. William and Margerie are last on this snapshot of a 2 page document image.

Plaise, William and Margerie Smith 1596 marriage

William and Margerie 1596 marriage

William was a widow in 1618 and married Phebe Manning, also a widow. In 1637 William and family sailed to America and settled in Salem, also known as Naumkeag. William was a gunsmith in London and also in Salem where his skills were highly valued in the new colony. When he requested 10 acres of land, he received it in May, 1637. “ Willm Plaise requested a ten acre lott and it is granted’.

William was 66 when he came to America, he lived 10 more years and stayed in Salem. He shared his gunsmith skills and tools with Richard Waters, 2nd wife Phebe’s son. In William’s estate papers an inventory included: one feather bed, two feather bolsters, one great Bible, one psalme book, one chest, and ‘tools that Richard Walters [Waters] hath’. William died in 1646 his burial place is unknown.

Sources

Harm Henrichs b. 1877

Harm Siebelt Henrichs 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Harm was born on July 1, 1877 in Aurich, Lower Saxony, Germany. With his 8 brothers and sisters, mom Maria and dad Henrich he sailed to America and arrived in Baltimore on March 18, 1885. The US 1900 census shows the Henrichs family in Ripley Township, Butler County Iowa. Harm and his siblings Fred, Tena and Mattie are living with Henrich and Maria, the older children have started families of their own in Butler County.

The 1930 census of Jefferson Township in Butler County shows Harm, his wife Jennie and their 2 kids living on their own farm. Harms’s sisters are neighbors: William and Tena Henrichs Jacobs, Enno and Annie Henrichs Frerichs, John and Marie Henrichs Stoppelmoor, Harry and Flora Henrichs Endleman. Harm’s bothers John and Fred lived close by in Ripley and West Point townships. They all lived on farms. They built houses, barns, shelters for their livestock, chicken houses; cleared and laid out crop fields.

Ebenezer Lutheran Church Butler Center, Iowa

They also built a church: Ebenezer Lutheran Church, no longer around. The photo is from the book Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002. Harm is 4th from left. Left to right: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann- brother in law, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs -brother in law and grandpa of Stanley Roose, dad of Mary Frerichs Roose. Stopping work to snap a photo probably took a lot of convincing on the photographer’s part. The photo doesn’t have a date, it’s probably around 1905

The 1940 census shows Harm was still farming, age 62, with Jennie. Their daughter Anna is 2 farms away, married to Addo Janssen with one son Robert. Their son Henry is in Jefferson Township, married to Delma DeBower.

Sources

  • Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002, page 152. A Building Project with text: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs. Author’s permission to post photo. More on this book.
  • US Census 1900, 1930, 1940 at Ancestry and FamilySearch
  • Maryland Baltimore passenger lists index 1820-1897 at FamilySearch

Joan Hurst b. 1568

Joan Hurst 11th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Joan Hurst was baptized March 13, 1568 at St Mary’s Parish in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England. Her first husband was Thomas Rogers who died around 1595. Her 2nd husband was John Tilley. They married September 20,1596 in the same St Mary’s Parish. They had 5 children, Elizabeth Tilley was the youngest she was baptize in the same church as her mom. In 1620 Joan 52, John 48 and Elizabeth 13 were on the Mayflower and in America by November. Joan’s husband John was in the exploring party on December 6 noted for the first contact with American Indians. By January 1621 the exploring parties found a location to set up their colony, an abandoned Wampanoag village. The men built shelters, with each man responsible for his own family, ‘by that course men would make more haste than working in common’. In February this group had homes, food and water sources and supplies unpacked form the Mayflower.

Tilley, John 1620 Mayflower exploring party

1620 Mayflower exploring party

By March the number of passengers and crew, was down to 47. From Bradford’s History. “Of these hundred persons which came first over in this first ship together, the greater half died in the general mortality, and most of them in two or three months’ time.”

Joan Hurst, her husband John Tilley, John’s brother Edward Tilley and Ann, his wife, they died the first winter and were buried in Coles Hill Burial Ground. Joan and John’s daughter Elizabeth was left an orphan and eventually married another passenger John Howland. Elizabeth and John had 10 kids who all survived so today this couple has 2 million Mayflower descendants. I’m working on getting this Mayflower connection officially verified, the 400th anniversary is coming up November 2020.

Sources

Hannah Littlefield b. 1633

Hannah Littlefield 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Hannah was baptized on August 10, 1633 with her twin, Thomas at St Peters Church Titchfield. This church was built beginning in the 7th century, with updates and additions it still stands and has an amazing history involving monks, Henry the 8th, Victorian disapproval and more. Photos on google Maps. Hannah, her dad, grandpa and grandma all lived in Titchfield. Hannah’s grandma Mary Littlefield is buried at St Peters. Hannah would barely remember Titchfield, she left for America at 5 years old. Her dad and a brother sailed earlier, then Hannah, her mom. siblings and two servants, maybe one a tutor sailed on the Bevis in 1638. The Littlefields were in Boston, then left for Wells, Maine where they were among the first settlers on the Webhannet River.

At age 29 Hannah married Peter Cloyes. Hannah and Peter stayed in Salem, they probably had 10 children. Hannah had died by 1683 when Peter married Sarah Towne, also a widow.

Hannah was named in her mom and dad’s wills. Her dad Edmund leaves her 15 pounds, her mom Annis leaves Hannah a bed and bolster, woolens and linens and Annis leaves son in law Peter acres of land.

Sources

Yevkea Frerichs b. 1862

Updated from August 5 2017

Yevkea Frerichs 3rd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Yevkea  Frerichs was born on February 26, 1862 in Germany. She was the oldest child of Casjen and Kuna Janssen Frerichs and was already married when she emigrated in 1883. She and her husband Joost Reents were on the same ship as Yevkea’s family- the America which sailed from Germany, checked in at a New York harbor then docked in Baltimore, Maryland on October 10, 1883. Both Joost and Yevkea have ‘brewer’ as their occupation on immigration cards. Fairly quickly the whole group was in Butler County, Iowa. How they made this 1000 mile journey isn’t known.

Yevkea’s name on records is: Kate, Carrie, Jerkea, Terker. Her name was almost certainly Yevkea or Yeikea.

Frerichs Reents, Yevkea immigration 1883

Yevkea had her first child on June 15 1884, Kurnie Reents, born in Butler County, Iowa. Yevkea and Joost had 6 children, Kurnie, another duaghter Jennie and a son Casjen survived to adulthood. Yevkea and her infant daughter died in the winter of 1891. Joost married again, Henrieko Winterboer from Germany, they had children and settled in South Dakota. The family farmed. Yevkea and Joost’s son Casjen also farmed in South Dakota then lived and is buried in Bend, Oregon. Daughters Kurnie Dockter stayed in South Dakota, had a family and lived to age 95,  Jennie Giebink stayed in South Dakota, married and her family also farmed.

Yevkea is buried at Jungling Cemetery near Allison, Iowa. Her mom and dad Kuna and Casjen are buried in buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in Parkersburg Iowa, their headstones look the same and both have a mix of English and German words.

Sources