William Speedy b. 1783

William Speedy 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

William Speedy was born in 1783 in Pennsylvania. His parents aren’t known. He probably grew up in Pennsylvania then left for Ohio where he fought in the War of 1812.

Speedy, William on War of 1812 roster

War of 1812 Roster

On April 13, 1823 he married Elizabeth Glenn. He and Elizabeth had 6 sons Thomas, John, James, Clark, William and Manford. The Speedys lived in Jefferson County, Ohio near the Ohio River. William’s farm in 1850 had 100 acres of improved land, 100 acres of unimproved land, a cash value of $1000 and $200 worth of tools and machinery. Livestock on the farm included 5 horse, 2 milking cows, 2 cattle, 20 pigs valued at $450. the farm produced 500 bushels of wheat, 100 bushels bushels of Indian corn, 20 pounds of Irish potatoes, 300 lbs of butter, 8 tons of hay and 3 bushels of clover seed.

William was a widow in 1850, his wife Elizabeth and her dad Thomas Glenn died in the cholera epidemic in Ohio. By 1856 William’s younger sons Clark and Manford were in Shell Rock, Iowa living with Thomas Hall, son of Mary Glenn Hall- Elizabeth Glenn Speedy’s sister. William joined his sons in 1870 and lived with Manford and his family in Iowa. William died in 1872 he was 83 years old.

William is buried at Riverside Cemetery in Shell Rock Iowa. One of 7 Speedys in that cemetery. Annie Coates Speedy, 1st wife of Manford, their 4 children who died young Bertha, Blanche, Eda and Julet and Clark Speedy, son of William, brother to Manford.

Andrew and Manford Speedy cousins

William Speedy is somehow related to Allen Speedy born in Ireland or Scotland in about 1726. I haven’t found any records showing this connection only my DNA results which show Allen Speedy’s descendants as ‘half 4th cousins’. Allen Speedy b. 1726, a cousin or uncle of William Speedy, were both living in Pennsylvania and then in Jefferson County, Ohio. Allen Speedy had a son Andrew, 13 years younger than William, photo shows Andrew Speedy’s family. The 1820 census in Jefferson County Wisconsin shows Allen and William Speedy as neighbors.

Sources

Michael Young b. 1787

Michael Young 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Micheal Young was born in 1787 in Pennsylvania, his ancestors were probably German and their name may have been Jung. Michael married Mary -her last name not known. Michael and Mary had at least 5 children. Michael was a farmer and active in local politics.

The Stark County Democrat newspaper of April 24, 1841 show Michael and son in law Isaac Dickerhoof as administrators on Baranabus Weller’s will. Michael and Isaac offer up lands and a log chain. Barnabus may be a son in law of Michael’s. And no relation but of this time, Valentine Rinehart offers a six cents reward for a runaway apprentice, about 16 years old, five feet, stout, fair complexion, clothing not recollected.

The 1850 US agricultural census records Michael’s farm. The farm had 106 acres of improved land, 70 acres of unimproved, the farm’s value was $7000, machinery valued at $75. The farm had 7 horses, 8 milk cows, 5 sheep and 16 swine; and produced 290 bushels of wheat, 30 bushels of rye, 250 bushels of Indian Corn and 300 bushels of oats. In 1855 on the New Map of Stark, Ohio his lands were nearby family and in laws: Bairs Bowmans, Bryans, Dickerhoofs, Essigs, Grubbs, Harters, Kryders, Millers and Shrivers. Michael’s land is above the M in Marlboro.

Young, Michael 1850 land in Marlboro screenshot

M. Young 1855 Marlboro Township

Michael was a widow in 1857 and shortly after moved to Randolph about 30 miles north of Stark. Michael’s daughter Susannah married Isaac Dickerhoof, she died in 1851. Michael’s son Isaac married Susannah Shriver, Isaac died in 1852 and he and Susannah’s sons died in 1851 and 53. There was a major cholera epidemic in Ohio at this time, It’s probable that Michael’s wife, daughter, son, and grandsons died in this epidemic. Michael’s son Peter married Catherine Truby they moved to Elkhart, Indiana. Michael’s daughters Hannah and Esther both married in Ohio. Esther married Peter Miller they moved to Waverly, Iowa. Hannah married John Bryan they stayed in Stark. A son of Hannah and John Bryan visited his aunt Esther and uncle Peter Miller in September of 1887, recorded in the Waverly (Iowa) Democrat newspaper.

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Elizabeth Stewart b. 1852

Elizabeth Stewart 2nd great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth Stewart was born on January 15, 1852 the youngest child of William and Elizabeth Crooks Stewart. She grew up on a farm in Crawford County Pennsylvania then in 1860 Elizabeth was in Jefferson, Wisconsin. In 1870 Elizabeth was in Shell Rock. Iowa and 18 years old. There on July 4, 1873 she married Manford Speedy, he was a widow with 2 kids. Together Elizabeth and Manford had 7 kids, 3 died at a young age. Elizabeth, Manford and kids lived on a 160 acre farm that included lots of livestock, 14 acres of grassland, 3 acres of apple trees and 10 acres of forest.

Elizabeth belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. On the 1895 census her family has 3 religions, Elizabeth is a Methodist, Manford a Baptist, daughters Eva and Ethel Congregationalists. Before 1905 Elizabeth and family had moved from their farm to nearby Allison, Iowa. Her oldest step daughter Annette was married and in Springbrook, Wisconsin, stepson Oscar was in Stockton, California, two daughters Eva and Ethel and 2 sons Harve and Ernest were at home.

Elizabeth had health problems in her later years and died in 1905, she was 53 and the cause of death was ‘rheumatism’. Elizabeth’s funeral was at the Methodist Episcopal Church, “The funeral was conducted from the Methodist church with a verse from Corinthians selected by Mrs. Speedy: For now we see through a glass darkly but then face to face”. Bible verse: 1 Corinthians 13:12 (King James Version) For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

Sources

  • Clarksville (Iowa) Star, 1872-2017 1904 Nov 16 page 4 of 8 column 2, 3. Death of Mrs. Speedy
  • 1880 US Agricultural Census at Ancestry
  • 1860 United States Federal Census at Ancestry
  • 1895 Iowa census at FamilySearch
  • Iowa county marriages 1838-1934 at FamilySearch
  • Iowa death records 1904-1951 at FamilySearch

Samuel Druckenbrod b. 1833

Samuel Druckenbrod 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Samuel was born in Pennsylvania on May 6, 1833. He was baptized July 14, 1834 in the German Lutheran church at Warwick, PA. Samuel’s great grandpa Matthias was probably the first of his family in America, arriving in the early 1700s during upheaval in Germany and William Penn’s German communities in Pennsylvania. By 1850 his family had moved west to Plain City in Stark County, Ohio.

Samuel married Elizabeth Harter Bair in Stark in 1854. Samuel and Elizabeth had 12 kids and they stayed in Stark, Ohio, they were farmers. On the 1900 US census Samuel and Elizabeth are still farmers. Their son Ivy recorded this census, his name is at the top as ‘enumerator’. In the future Ivy would be superintendent of the Stark County Infirmary. Daughter Fianna Druckenbrod is the only child to move from Ohio. Fianna moved to Bremer County, Iowa with her husband William L. Miller, also from Stark, Ohio, grandparents of Faber Miller.

Samuel was a widow in 1902 and he died on February 14, 1905. At his death his home was in Stark, Ohio, he was on a visit to Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 35 miles north, where his two daughters Lidia Druckenbrod Crist and Adeline Druckenbrod Miller were living with their families. The area in the 1800 and 1900s provided “recreation for urban dwellers … the Valley Railway became another way to escape urban industrial life”. The Cuyahoga Valley National Park was established in 2000 and has 100 waterfalls, trails, 250 species of birds and more.

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Elizabeth Crooks b. 1810

Elizabeth Crooks 3rd great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth was born in Pennsylvania on May 3 1810, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Jeffrey Crooks. Elizabeth’s mom died when she was 7 and her dad remarried. In 1830, Elizabeth married William Stewart, also of Pennsylvania. They lived in French Creek, PA 30 miles east of Lake Erie, on the western edge of Pennsylvania. Elizabeth’s dad died in 1849 and in his will he named each of his children, Elizabeth and her sisters each inherited $100.

On the 1850 census Elizabeth was still in French Creek, Pennsylvania on a farm, she and William Stewart had 6 kids, ages 2 to 17 years old. On the 1860 census Elizabeth and family have moved 500 miles west to Jefferson, Green County Wisconsin. On the 1870 US census Elizabeth had moved 200 miles further west to Shell Rock, Butler County, Iowa. Elizabeth was 60, her husband William 65. Their 2 younger children James 24 and Elizabeth 18 were in the home, James and William farmed. Elizabeth was a widow in 1874 and on the 1880 census was living with daughter Elizabeth who had married Manford Speedy and their family. They all lived near Allison, Iowa.

Elizabeth Crooks died September 26, 1887 and had an obituary in the local newspaper, “Shell Rock, Mrs. Elizabeth Stewart, mother of J.W. and William Stewart of this place, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. M.B. Speedy at Allison, Monday evening, September 26th, at the ripe old age of 77 years, 4 months, and 23 days. She was buried in the cemetery at this place on the following Wednesday”. She id buried at Riverside Cemetery in Shell Rock, Iowa.

Sources

Jacob Miller b. 1808

Jacob Miller 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Jacob was born in 1808 in Virginia. On April 18, 1833 in Jackson, Ohio he married Sarah Davis, also from Virginia. They had their first child in Ohio then moved to Elkhart Indiana and had 9 more kids. The 1840 and 1850 US censuses show Jacob and family farmed in Baugo Township, 50 miles east of Lake Michigan, near Elkhart and South Bend, Indiana The red rectangle on the Google map shows the location. The Mitchell family from New York were neighbors in 1850 and on August 7, 1850 Jacob and Sarah’s oldest daughter Mary married Moses Mitchell and they moved to Iowa.

Jacob Miller photo

Miller, Jacob d. 1854 newspaper snapshot

Jacob died in 1854 at age 46 and there’s a pretty good chance he was hit by a train after a night of drinking. The newspaper article (Peru (Indiana) Wabash Valley Olio 1854 Jan 13) shows detail. In 1845 the ‘Temperance’ lobby, movement was pretty well established and continued to grow until prohibition in 1920. When Jacob died, his widow, with 8 kids still at home, one of them just born in 1854, decided to move 400 miles west to Iowa, where her oldest daughter Mary Mitchell and family lived. That move set in motion the marriage of Sarah’s son James to Mary Ella Gaines then the birth of their son William, then William’s marriage and the birth of his son, Faber who married Gladys. Faber’s sister Florence kept family history notes with the names and births of her family including Jacob’s family. Jacob’s kids would set up homes in California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Washington, 3 stayed in Iowa, 3 are currently unknown.

Sources

  • 1850 US Census at FamilySearch
  • Public Ancestry photo “LanceL_Ferris originally shared this 24 Dec 2013”.
  • Newspaper Archive, Cedar Rapids Public Library, Peru (Indiana) Wabash Valley Olio 1854 Jan 13

Samuel Newcomb b. 1794

Samuel Newcomb 1st cousin 6 generations away or 6 times removed on RootsMagic tree. Samuel was also the adoptive dad of William Newcomb Gaines, great grandpa of Faber Miller.

Samuel was born January 8, 1794 in Bernardston, Massachusetts to William and Elizabeth Connable Newcomb. The Connable and Newcomb families were pioneers, long time residents of Berndardston. At age 18 Samuel fought in the War of 1812 and received a pension and 160 acres of land as payment. After the war he had a farm next to his brother Obadiah. Samuel married Jemima Hunting on Oct 13, 1822. Samuel and Jemima had a son William, who died before age one.

In 1826 Samuel adopted William N Gaines, son of Samuel’s cousin Leydia Connable Gaines. Samuel joined the Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), even though ‘he believed Brigham Young was an imposter’. In 1832 in Onondaga, NY Orson Pratt, an early LDS Church leader baptized Samuel and Jemima. Samuel, his wife and adopted son William moved to Kirtland, Ohio the early home of the Latter Day Saints and home of the first Mormon temple.

A sketch of Salt Lake city in 1860By 1850 Samuel and his family were in Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory. Samuel was a widow in 1851. He wrote his will in 1855 leaving all to “William Newcomb Gaines my adopted son”. Samuel lived to age 85, he died in Janesville, Iowa and was living with William and family in his later years. “He was treated kindly in his old age by Mr. and Mrs. Gaines, and he died at their home”. Samuel is buried in Oakland Cemetery near Janesville, Iowa with William Gaines and his family.

Sources

  • “History of Orson Pratt,” Deseret News, 9 June 1858, 65. John Tanner or the Bolton Branch mentioned in December 20, 1832 and February 2, 1833 entries shared on FamilySearch
  • Will in Iowa, Wills and Probate Records, 1758-1997 at Ancestry
  • Early members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Volume 4 page 592 image 594 of 920
  • At Wikipedia ‘Utah’ page, may be from Richard F. Burton’s City of the Saints, Public Domain
  • Bernardston Births, Marriages and Death image 40 of 233 handwritten, right page Samuel and Jemima 2nd on list. “Samuel Newcomb Gaines and Jemima Hunting both of this town October 13, 1822”