Clyde Flood b. 1888

Clyde Flood 1st cousin 3x removed on RootsMagic tree

Clyde William Flood was born in South Dakota on March 6, 1888 to George and Lucy Lewis Flood. He had a younger sister Edith, also born in South Dakota, they returned to Butler County, Iowa when the kids were young. In Butler County Clyde and Edith grew up with their cousins Elmer Angell and Philippa Flood Mockford.

Clyde, Edith and Philippa’s grandma Delia Angell Flood was the sister of Elmer’s dad Charles Angell. The Flood and Angell families would have gotten together for picnics and holidays. Clyde and Elmer Angel were close in age, so were Philippa Mockford and Edith Flood.

Snapshots of Clyde and cousins

Clyde grew up on a farm so he would have helped his mom and dad with chores, planting, crops, livestock. At the 1905 Butler County Fair, Clyde won premiums for flowers he raised including a first place for Dahlias. Clyde and Elmer Angell both fought in World War 1. Clyde enlisted in 1917 and served 17 months in the Iowa 95th Aero Squadron, promoted to Corporal . “The squadron was initially formed in early August 1917 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, where 150 civilians were sworn into the United States Army as soldiers. The newly-sworn in men were sent to Kelly Field, Texas, where they arrived on 19 August and were organized as the 95th Aero Squadron.” Elmer died in the Meuse–Argonne battle, in France, 1918.

Flood, Clyde WW1Clyde came home in May, 1919 via the May 7 Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper. “Chas. Thomsen and Clyde Flood arrived here Sunday morning having received their discharge from the army after service over seas.” Though 1920-21 Clyde was active in getting a Butler County post for the American Legion. December 15, 1921 he was elected Sergeant at Arms. September 25, 1924 via the Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper, “Iving and Milo Isaacson, Clyde Flood and Dave Kramer drove to St Paul the first of the week where they represented the Allison Post of the American Legion at the National Convention. They returned last week and report having a find trip and a mighty good time at the convention”.

He liked cars too. In November 1934 Clyde bought a brand new Chevrolet Coach. April on 1936 he got a new Chevrolet Carry All Suburban.

Flood, Clyde with a trukeyClyde found work at a turkey farm after he returned from the war. Mr. Nicholas, the farm owner, had a broken electric fan. Nichols was ready to throw it away- Clyde was looking for work, asked to look at the fan ‘from an old battery he got enough material to start’ then fix the fan. Clyde stayed at the turkey farm for 20+ years. In 1944 the Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette had a story about the Nicholas farm and all the birds being shipped overseas for the the World War 2 soldiers Thanksgiving Dinner. Clyde is featured in the story, he was 56 in 1944.

Clyde married Mary ‘Mayme’ Noonan June 27, 1941 in Mason City. They married later in life and didn’t have kids and lived at 420 South Fillmore Avenue there’s a Walgreen’s there now. Clyde died January 25, 1950 at The Des Moines Veteran’s Hospital. Mayme died in 1971. Both are buried Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City, Iowa.

Sources

John Kryder b. 1736

John Kryder 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in France, Germany or Pennsylvania on or around April 22, 1736, sources vary. By 1767 he was definitely in Pennsylvania where he married Ann Maria Fuchs or Fox. John and Ann had at least 5 children born between 1768 and 1775 in the area of Lancaster, PA.

John and family were part of the German American Pennsylvania community. During the American Revolution they were in the Big Runaway of 1778: “The Big Runaway was a mass evacuation in June and July 1778 of settlers from the frontier areas of what is now north central Pennsylvania during the American Revolutionary War.” The locals knew of the dangers because of the war, had requested aid: rifles, armed men from the Continental Congress, none of it arrived in time. So everyone fled with livestock and whatever possessions they could carry. Books and movies could be made about this one event, it’s huge and lasted through 1779 when the American gov’t committed more aid to “security of the frontier”.

Kryder John bacon and beef soldJohn sold bacon and beef to the Continental Army during the American Revolution. His neighbor George Marquart had the mutton and Jacob Yeiser provided the brandy. At some point John fought in the American Revolution. There’s no military records yet, but his headstones recognize his service in the American Revolution and the French Indian Wars. John has a headstone probably original from his death in 1803 and then a newer marker which his descendants set out out in 1994.

Sources

Martin Roose b. 1891

Martin Roose great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Martin Roose was named after his grandpa Martin Wisbar and born on July 14 1891, the 2nd of 7 children of Johann and Lena Wisbar Roose. Martin’s older brother was George Roose, dad of Stanley Roose, Stanley and Martin shared a birthday. George, Martin and siblings grew up on their family farm, with their St Bernard dog Watch, in Jackson Township, Butler County, Iowa.

On June 12, 1917 Martin married Lillian Sinram. They had a daughter, Leona, in 1918 and a son, Harlan, in 1919, both children died young. Two daughters were born in 1923 and 1931. Their dad bought them a pony in 1936, “Dorothy and Margery Roose are the proud owners of a pony purchased Saturday by their father, Martin Roose for their pleasure and enjoyment.”

The 1930 census shows Martin, sister Minnie Roose Hahn, sister Mattie Roose Harms and brother George, all neighbors in Jackson township ‘1 mile north of primary 10’. Martin is No. 51, Minnie 52, George 54 and Mattie 55.

In 1939 youngest brother Joe Roose held a cornhusking contest on his farm. Martin, Joe and George Roose all competed in the contest, a man from Parkersburg won, “husked a net load of 1020 pounds of corn during the 80 minutes”.

Martin died in Clarksville November 16, 1950 age 59. He had heart trouble for a few years, cause of death was a heart attack. Both Martin and Lillian Sinram Roose are buried at Lynwood Cemetery in Clarksville, Iowa.

Roose, Martin 1929 Hart Parr tractor

1929 Hart Parr tractor

1929 Hart Carr tractor in full color

1929 Hart Carr tractor in full color

In 1989 Martin was in the Clarksville newspaper when his 1929 Hart Parr tractor was featured at the Cedar Falls Threshers Reunion. HIs daughter Dorothy and her husband kept the tractor then sold it, the new owner completely restored it. Black and white photo is from the 1989 Clarksville Star newspaper, a copy, the color photo is from a website, not Martin’s actual tractor but a similar model.

Sources

Harm Henrichs b. 1877

Harm Siebelt Henrichs 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Harm was born on July 1, 1877 in Aurich, Lower Saxony, Germany. With his 8 brothers and sisters, mom Maria and dad Henrich he sailed to America and arrived in Baltimore on March 18, 1885. The US 1900 census shows the Henrichs family in Ripley Township, Butler County Iowa. Harm and his siblings Fred, Tena and Mattie are living with Henrich and Maria, the older children have started families of their own in Butler County.

The 1930 census of Jefferson Township in Butler County shows Harm, his wife Jennie and their 2 kids living on their own farm. Harms’s sisters are neighbors: William and Tena Henrichs Jacobs, Enno and Annie Henrichs Frerichs, John and Marie Henrichs Stoppelmoor, Harry and Flora Henrichs Endleman. Harm’s bothers John and Fred lived close by in Ripley and West Point townships. They all lived on farms. They built houses, barns, shelters for their livestock, chicken houses; cleared and laid out crop fields.

Ebenezer Lutheran Church Butler Center, Iowa

They also built a church: Ebenezer Lutheran Church, no longer around. The photo is from the book Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002. Harm is 4th from left. Left to right: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann- brother in law, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs -brother in law and grandpa of Stanley Roose, dad of Mary Frerichs Roose. Stopping work to snap a photo probably took a lot of convincing on the photographer’s part. The photo doesn’t have a date, it’s probably around 1905

The 1940 census shows Harm was still farming, age 62, with Jennie. Their daughter Anna is 2 farms away, married to Addo Janssen with one son Robert. Their son Henry is in Jefferson Township, married to Delma DeBower.

Sources

  • Mission in a Mile by Henry Freese, 2002, page 152. A Building Project with text: Ben Jasper, Harry Endelmann, Frank Reints, Harm Henrichs, Rigt Ooster, Enno Frerichs. Author’s permission to post photo. More on this book.
  • US Census 1900, 1930, 1940 at Ancestry and FamilySearch
  • Maryland Baltimore passenger lists index 1820-1897 at FamilySearch

Alexander Glenn b. 1803

Alexander Glenn 4th great uncle on RootsMagic

Alexander was born in Ohio in 1803, a younger brother of Elizabeth Glenn, mom of Manford Speedy, they were 2 of 12 children in the Glenn family. In 1833 on March 31, Alexander married Sarah Parrish in Ohio. It’s very likely that Manford Speedy with his uncle Alexander and family left Ohio for Iowa, all are in Shell Rock, Iowa by 1856. Alexander is on the 1860 agricultural census. His farm has 100 acres of  improved land, 100 acres unimproved land, cash value of $3500, value of farm machinery $150. The farm has 4 horses, 6 milk cows,  6 other cattle, 30 swine, value of livestock $725. The farm produced 225 bushel of wheat,  600 bushel of Indian corn,  200 bushel of oats, 100 lbs of butter, 15 lbs of cheese and 20 bushel Irish potatoes. Alexander was a widow in 1877 and living in Hampton, Iowa with his son Edward and family.

Alexander died in 1894 and is buried in the Old Town Cemetery in Clarksville, Iowa. The source Iowa Cemetery Records, 1662-1999 confirms he was buried in this cemetery: ‘Alex Glenn b. 1803, d. 1894 age 91 buried in Old-town Cemetery, Clarksville, Butler County. Source Gravestone Records of Butler County, Iowa page 37’. The Glenn headstone has a readable inscription for Sarah. On the other side of the headstone is some engraving, most likely Alexander’s information, completely unreadable because it was made 125 years ago, weather and age have worn the words away. The headstone has an open book at the top, inscription also worn away.

Glenn, Alexander and Sarah headstone has a book on top.

 

Sources

  • Iowa, Cemetery Records, 1662-1999
  • Ohio county marriages 1789-2013 database
  • Iowa non-population census schedules 1850-1880 images

Thomas Barnes b. 1602

Thomas Barnes 11th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Thomas was born about 1602 in England and was living in Hingham, Massachusetts by 1637 when he and his (probable) brother Peter were on a handwritten list, First Settlers, of Hingham. About 1643 Thomas married Anna her last name is unknown. Thomas was a weaver and farmer. He was a freeman in 1645.

Barnes, Thomas headstone

Thomas Barnes d. 1672

His will was written April 29, 1671. He named his wife and children and his inventory included books, blankets, a cedar chest, yards of cloth, cotton and woolen yarn, 5 painted earthen ware dishes, weaving and farming supplies, livestock, bushels of produce, lots of land.

Thomas died in 1672 and is buried in Hingham Cemetery. The cemetery was founded in 1672 Thomas’s headstone was the first, this is noted on FindAGrave. The headstone is original but doesn’t mark his burial place. It was placed with others in a circle around the Founders Monument. The cemetery is right behind Old Ship Church, the only remaining 17th-century Puritan meeting house in America.


The ancestry of Emily Jane Angell, 1844-1910 page 195 Barnes section

At Ancestry. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 Hingham Records of First Settlers image 2 of 81 Thomas and Peter Barnes 1637 Thomas d. Nov.29 1672

At HathiTrust.

Find a Grave memorial 51474179. Oldest original headstone in the cemetery. Headstone photos “Added by Hammer”

Old Ship Church on Wikipedia

Samuel Tefft b. 1643

Samuel Tefft 9th great-grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Samuel was born near Kingstown, Rhode Island in 1643. His parents were John and Mary, he had a brother Joshua and 2 sisters. Samuel moved to Providence RI his first record there in 1676 when he’s named guardian of brother Joshua’s son. Joshua was accused of treason in the Great Swamp Fight of King Philips War and put on trial for fighting with the Narragansett tribe against New England colonies. Joshua was found guilty and hanged. That’s when Samuel and Jireh Bull (husband of Godsgift Arnold) were named guardians of Joshua’s son Peter.

In 1676 or 77 Samuel married Elizabeth Jenckes, daughter of Joseph, sister to Gov’r Jenckes. Samuel was a freeman in 1677 and by 1687 the Teffts had moved to Kingstown Rhode Island by 1687. Samuel wrote his will on March 16, 1725. He put his widow Elizabeth in charge of the estate and she received all moveables, the dwelling house, orchards, and more. Samuel’s kids and grandkids are named in this will. He owned a lot: lands, livestock, housewares, a sword and 2 linen wheels, 2 spinning wheels, a pair of worsted combs and yarn.

Samuel Tefft and Daniel Williams elected the Grand Jury, 1679

Samuel Tefft and Daniel Williams elected the Grand Jury, 1679

Benjamin English b. 1678

Benjamin English 7th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born October 19, 1678, the 4th of 6 children, his parents were Mary Waters and Clement English. Benjamin was 6 years old when his dad died and soon after Benjamin’s mom married John Stephens, a fisherman. The family lived in Salem, near Cat Cove and Winter Island. It’s almost certain Benjamin helped his dad with fishing. In Benjamin’s time Cat Cove was used for fishing and shipbuilding. The map shows, at the right edge, homes of Benjamin’s mom Mary Waters English Stephens, his aunts Abigail Waters Punchard and Hannah Waters Striker and his uncle Ezekiel Waters, all living on lands their father left them.

Cat Cove, Salem MA

Snapshot of Salem Map in 1700

To the left, Philip English had a huge house in the same area, no relation to this English family yet. The drawing of Philip’s house is at the (Nathaniel) ‘Hawthorne in Salem’ website. Historians believe this Philip English house or the John Turner house nearby were the inspiration for Hawthorne’s ‘House of Seven Gables’. Benjamin’s family home would have looked about the same, smaller.

Philip English house at Salem

Drawing of Philip English house in Salem

By 1720 Benjamin was in New Haven, Connecticut where he married Rebecca Brown of New Haven. Rebecca’s sister Hannah was married on the same day to William Punchard. “Marriages in New Haven, William Punchard and Hannah Browne were married April 21 1703. Benjamin English and Rebecca Brown were married the same day, John Alling justice”. Benjamin and Rebeca stayed in New Haven and had 8 children.

Sources

Charles Fries b. 1820

Charles Fries 2nd great grandfather, on RootsMagic tree

Charles Fries was born about 1822 and probably came to America from Baden, Germany around 1840. Charles married Emma. On the 1860 census they have 4 children and are living in Kenton, Kentucky. Charles is a teamster, in 1860 this person drove a team of animals: ox, horses, mules.  Charles’s next record is the 1880 census, Emma has died and Charles has married Mary, also a widow with children. The Fries family is living in Cave In Rock at the southern edge of Illinois, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. With Charles’s youngest son, Mary’s son and daughter and their shared 4 daughters, they are a family of nine. They’ve also got a hired man in the home, they all lived on a farm that included 7 acres of potatoes and a 3 acre apple orchard.

The farm is owned with 60 acres tilled land, 20 acres meadow, 15 acres woodland and 10 mown acres. The farm value is $2000 total, with $20 machinery, $400 of livestock, $30 spent on buildings and repairs. $80 is the total amount paid for wages for 25 weeks hired labor. $1135 is the total value of all farm productions which are: 8 tons of hay, 2 mules on hand, 2 working oxen, 2 cows, 1 other cow, 1 cow born, 2 cows sold, 1 cow purchased. And 175 lbs of butter, 100 pigs, 20 chickens with 175 dozen eggs, 20 acres of Indian corn produced 800 bushels, 20 acres of oats produced 150 bushels, 5 acres of wheat produced 160 bushels, 7 acres of Irish potatoes produced 1200 bushels. 3 acres of apple trees had 60 fruit bearing trees and 25 cords of wood were cut.

Sources

  • 1860 and 1880 United States census database at FamilySearch.org
  • Illinois Non-Population Census Schedules 1850-1880 at FamilySearch.org

 

 

Jake Miller b. 1841

Jake Miller 3rd great uncle,  on RootsMagic tree

Jacob Miller was born August 6, 1841 in Elkhart, Indiana the 3rd child of 9. The family farmed, the kids went to school. Jake’s dad died when he was 13 and soon after the family moved to Iowa close to where his older sister, now married, was living near Nashua, Iowa.

Jake stayed single. In his later years he lived with his bother Jame’s family, then with his nephew James Archard Miller and family. When his brother James D married Mary Ella Gaines, Jake is on the marriage record testifying to the bride and groom’s ‘competent age and condition’. On census records Jake is a farmer, a horse breeder and a horse trainer. He lived in Janesville, Bristow and Greene, Iowa and was a welcome guest in the Janesville Waverly area. On the 4th of July 1885. “Mr Jacob Miller was down from near Bristow to spend the 4th with his friends around Janesville. Jake is always a welcome guest in these parts.”

Miller, Jake obituary