Clement English b. 1646

Clement English 8th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Clement was born in Massachusetts in 1646. His parents aren’t known but it’s likely they migrated from England during the ‘great migration’ of 1620-1640. Clement married Mary Waters in Salem, on August 27, 1667. Mary’s family was part of Salem’s colonial beginnings, so it’s likely Clement English’s family was too. Marriages in the 1600s were rarely random, but planned within churches, communities, families.

Clement and son Benjamin in Massachusetts Town Records

Clement and Mary had 3 sons and 3 daughters. The family stayed in Salem where Clement was a merchant in one of the busiest ports in colonial America. In 1668 Clement and his brother in law William Punchard were two of many who signed petitions against taxes or imposts. “Seventhly Whether customs though layd on wine, tobacco and things not Essentiall to life were euer wont to bee layd on corne and such necessaries wthout which wee Cannot possibly subsist.” The courts didn’t repeal the taxes but did reduce the taxes.

Petition against taxes 1668

Clement had a short life, he died at age 36 on October 23, 1682. There is a summary “Abstracts from will, inventories etc. on file in the office of the clerk of courts Salem, Mass. Clement English, 4th mo., 1683. An Inventory of the estate of Clement English, taken 24th of May, 1683. Amount L43 04s. 6d., and Administration granted unto Mary, the relict. 29 June, 1683, mentions for the bringing up of the children.” But the actual papers of the Clement’s will, the inventory, probate are gone, missing.

Clement and family lived during one smallpox epidemic which reached Salem in October 1678. William Lord of Salem had small pox, he and family had to “keep within their house, and that they do not offer to sale any of their ware, viz. bread, cake, gingerbread and the like, and that they suffer none to come to their house but what necessity requires.” July 10, 1679 Salem courts ordered a fast day or day of prayer to help stop the spread, “in respect of that most dreaded contagious disease, wherewith sundry places have been sorely visited.” Because Clement died young, age 36, it’s possible smallpox was the cause, no proof & no facts- it’s speculation.

Sources

Mary English b. 1715

Mary English 6th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Mary English was born December 29, 1715 in New Haven, Connecticut. Her parents were Benjamin and Rebecca Brown English and she was a middle child of 8. Her grandparents came to America in the mid 1600s  her 2nd great grandpas Peter Bulkeley and John Jones were two of the first pastors in the new world. A disagreement between the pastors brought Mary and her family to Connecticut, “The trials and discouragements at Concord (Peter Bulkeley’s church) continued, and in 1644 Mr. Jones and several families removed to Fairfield. Conn. With them went Mr. Bulkeley’s sons, Thomas (Mary’s great grandpa) and Daniel, the former married to a daughter of Mr. Jones (Mary great grandma).”

In New Haven, CT 1740 Mary married Samuel Connable. There is a family story in a published genealogy that Mary’s robin egg blue wedding dress was still preserved by family members in 1886. Another family story tells that Mary and Samuel left for their new home in Fall Town, Massachusetts they rode together, shared the same horse, Mary carrying a bag of housewares. The stories may or may not be true but were shared through the generations then published in 1886.

Mary lived to age 86, she died a few years before Samuel. They’re buried in Bernardston nearby where they lived. Their headstones are still right there. Near Old Cemetery is Charity Farm, gifted to the city in the 1830s as “source of income to assist the industrious and deserving poor”. In Mary and Samuel’s time the area was Bald (Ball) Mountain today Bald Mountain Rd goes from Old Cemetery to Charity Farms, now a public park, dogs welcome, with walking trails and fantastic views.

Sources, free sources linked

Benjamin English b. 1705

Benjamin English 7th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born February 3, 1705 in New Haven Connecticut, British America. He lived through the early days of the Revolutionary War and died towards the end of it, murdered in the Invasion of New Haven. This July 5, 1779 invasion is in lots of sources. Benjamin’s daughter in law Abigail provided a first hand account of his death in court. It’s sad and tragic but makes a reader appreciate all that went in to making America a free country 240 years ago.

Map of Hew Haven invasion

Drawing of 1779 Jul 5 invasion of New Haven

Benjamin was named after his dad, the 2nd of seven children. He married Sarah Dayton, “Benjamin English and Sarah Daton both of New Haven were Joined in marriage to Each other the 25th day of Sept:1735 Isaac Dickerman Justice of Peace.” Benjamin and Sarah stayed in New Haven and had at least 5 children. They named their first son Benjamin, he was s a Captain in King Philips War.

Sources

Benjamin English b. 1678

Benjamin English 7th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born October 19, 1678, the 4th of 6 children, his parents were Mary Waters and Clement English. Benjamin was 6 years old when his dad died and soon after Benjamin’s mom married John Stephens, a fisherman. The family lived in Salem, near Cat Cove and Winter Island. It’s almost certain Benjamin helped his dad with fishing. In Benjamin’s time Cat Cove was used for fishing and shipbuilding. The map shows, at the right edge, homes of Benjamin’s mom Mary Waters English Stephens, his aunts Abigail Waters Punchard and Hannah Waters Striker and his uncle Ezekiel Waters, all living on lands their father left them.

Cat Cove, Salem MA

Snapshot of Salem Map in 1700

To the left, Philip English had a huge house in the same area, no relation to this English family yet. The drawing of Philip’s house is at the (Nathaniel) ‘Hawthorne in Salem’ website. Historians believe this Philip English house or the John Turner house nearby were the inspiration for Hawthorne’s ‘House of Seven Gables’. Benjamin’s family home would have looked about the same, smaller.

Philip English house at Salem

Drawing of Philip English house in Salem

By 1720 Benjamin was in New Haven, Connecticut where he married Rebecca Brown of New Haven. Rebecca’s sister Hannah was married on the same day to William Punchard. “Marriages in New Haven, William Punchard and Hannah Browne were married April 21 1703. Benjamin English and Rebecca Brown were married the same day, John Alling justice”. Benjamin and Rebeca stayed in New Haven and had 8 children.

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