George Gardiner b. 1599

George Gardiner 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

George was born in February 1599 in London. In the genealogy world there’s a ‘fierce debate’ on his parents, currently his parents are unproven with a couple theories. George had 3 wives, the first was Sarah who probably died before he sailed for America around 1636, there’s not much info on Sarah. Herodias Long was his 2nd wife there are novels, books and journals written about Herodias. George and Herodias divorced after 20 years, they were in court many times. Herodias married John Porter- her 3rd husband. George married Lydia Ballou his 3rd wife in 1665. George had children with all wives, Lydia is our ancestor, they had 6 children.

George was a freeman in Newport, Rhode Island on December 17, 1639 and a landowner on January 29, 1639/40. He was a Sergeant of an early colonial company, on the grand jury, a constable and he witnessed land deeds including a deed on June 29, 1660 ‘from an Indian called Socho of a tract of land at Pettaquamscot’. On August 1662 he and Robert Stanton bought more lands near the Pettaquamscot Purchase. And later on George’s sons with Herodias would inherit all of their stepdad John Porter’s lands in the same area.

Gardiner land map

Map of Gardiner son’s land

George died in 1677, he lived to age 78 and is probably buried in a very old forgotten cemetery somewhere in Newport, Rhode Island.

Sources

 

William Plaise b. 1571

William Plaise 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

William was born in 1571 in England. On July 19 1596 he married his first wife Margerie Smith at St. Botolphs church. The church was first built in the 1100s then rebuilt in the 1500s and again in the 1700s. It’s still there in London.

Snapshot of the parish record of their marriage, “July Anno 1596. William Plasse and Margerie Smith weare married the 19 day in Anno Domino” [?]. William and Margerie are last on this snapshot of a 2 page document image.

Plaise, William and Margerie Smith 1596 marriage

William and Margerie 1596 marriage

William was a widow in 1618 and married Phebe Manning, also a widow. In 1637 William and family sailed to America and settled in Salem, also known as Naumkeag. William was a gunsmith in London and also in Salem where his skills were highly valued in the new colony. When he requested 10 acres of land, he received it in May, 1637. “ Willm Plaise requested a ten acre lott and it is granted’.

William was 66 when he came to America, he lived 10 more years and stayed in Salem. He shared his gunsmith skills and tools with Richard Waters, 2nd wife Phebe’s son. In William’s estate papers an inventory included: one feather bed, two feather bolsters, one great Bible, one psalme book, one chest, and ‘tools that Richard Walters [Waters] hath’. William died in 1646 his burial place is unknown.

Sources

Lydia Archer b. 1601

Lydia Archer 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

This person’s name may or may not be Lydia Archer, all that is really known is that she was a wife of Francis Sprague and mom of Mercy Sprague. Francis Sprague was a Pilgrim in Plymouth colony. He sailed with Mercy Sprague and Ann Sprague in 1623. It’s proven that Mercy Sprague was his daughter. Ann Sprague could have been a daughter or could have been a wife, could have been the mom of Mercy or not. There’s nothing to show who ‘Lydia Archer’ was. 

A great source, New England marriages prior to 1700 by Clarence Torrey, has Lydia as a wife, with questions. “SPRAGUE, Francis & [?Lydia]/?Anna ____; by 1621 in Eng; Plymouth/Duxbury/Dartmouth “

The Great Migration, another solid source, shows no info on Francis’s spouse(s) and a note, ‘there are very few dates for this family and many unanswered questions’.

In the ‘cattle division’ of 1627 Francis, Anna and Mercy Sprague are listed, same 3 from the passenger list of 1623. It doesn’t seem possible that Francis was a widow caring for 2 daughters on his own, for 4 years.

Sprague family 1627

Francis, Anne and Mercy Sprague 1627 ‘cattle division’

So it’s possible Lydia died in England then Francis with 2 daughters sailed to America and married a 2nd wife in Plymouth. Or it’s possible Lydia sailed with her husband and 2 daughters, made it to Plymouth Colony and died shortly after. Then Francis married a woman, probably recently widowed, whose name was never recorded. Lydia Archer’s story is speculative, hypothetical, ’thrown together’ or made up with no proof for names, dates, relationships.

Sources

  • Volume 2 page 1425, New England marriages to 1700 database at American Ancestors
  • Volume 3 P-W, page 1725-1728, Great Migration Begins at Ancestry
  • Page 95. History of Plymouth County, Massachusetts: with biographical sketches at HathiTrust

Annis Austin b. 1596

Annis Austin 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Annis was born in Exeter, England on February 1, 1596. In 1614 she married Edmund Littlefield, they were parents of 8 kids. Before 1638 Edmund and an older son sailed for America. In 1638 Annis went to America. She sailed on the Bevis with her younger kids and a couple servants. Annis’s brother Richard Austin with his family and a servant were on this same ship which landed in Boston May of 1638. (Annis’s brother Richard is the 3rd great grandfather of Stephen F. Austin, who founded Texas). Annis Edmund and family stayed in Boston for a short time then moved on to Wells, Maine where Edmund built the first sawmill and gristmill near Webhannet Falls. Annis with her family farmed and cleared the way for other English settlers. “With the aid of his large family, he (Edmund) prepared the way for the habitation of man”.

Annis was a widow in 1661 and wrote her will on December 12, 1677. She mentions each of her children and leaves land, wools, linens and a bed to daughter Hannah and husband Peter Cloyes- 9th great grandparents.

Austin, Annis on the Bevis closeup

Annis and children sailed on the Bevis 1638

Bevis_Passengers_1638

List of passengers 1638 on the Bevis

The history of Wells and Kennebunk from the earliest settlement page 77 

Richard Austin on Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Austin_(colonist)

The ship Bevis on Wikipedia with image of handwritten list
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bevis_(ship)

The Wells, Maine PD has a post on their Facebook page with a photo of the Littlefield marker: The Bridge of Flowers at Webhannet Falls.

Widow Walker b. 1600

Widow Walker 10th great grandmother on RootsMagic tree.

Widow Walker’s first name is unknown, her last name was probably Brown. She was born in England around 1600, married, then was widowed by 1635 when her two older children Sarah and James came to America with their uncle the widow’s brother, his name may have been John Brown. The widow and younger son Philip came to America about 1640. Widow Walker is on land records in 1643, 1644 and 1646 then she disappears with no more records. By 1658, son Philip is on land records. So her estimated death is in 1658 at about age 58. There are theories on her Brown family ancestors and her husband’s Walker family ancestors, but not much is proven, except her land.

Land Widow Walker and Zachariah Rhodes 1644 screenshot

The history of Rehoboth, page 25

In Vital Records of Rehoboth on page 911: “At a Town Meeting, the 31st day of the 4th month 1644, lots were drawn for a division of the woodland, between the plain and the town. Shares were drawn to the number of 58 as follows”: Widow Walker is the only female on the list of 58 which included The Schoolmaster, The Governor and The Pastor. Thomas Bliss 8th great grandpa of Elizabeth Speedy is also on the list.

Sources at HathiTrust
The history of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, page 25 Widow Walker and Zachariah Rhodes of Seakonk alias Rehoboth.

Vital record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896, page 911, Widow Walker No. 52

The story of my ancestors In America, page 8 Widow Walker settles in Seekonk, Rehoboth, land grants

 

John Whipple b. 1617

John Whipple 10th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Whipple was born in Essex, England in 1617. John age 14 or 15 arrived in Dorchester, now part of Boston, late summer of 1632. A servant of Israel Stoughton, John would have agreed to work 4-5 years in exchange for travel to America. His arrangement with Stoughton didn’t start out so well. October of 1632 John and another servant, Alex, were brought to court and ordered to pay Stoughton a certain sum each, for the powder and shot they’d wasted. In 1640 John was a Freeman, he’d worked off his debt. In 1641 he married Sarah, her last name is not known.

By 1658 he lived in Providence and stayed through King Philipps War, one of 27. These 27 who ’ staid’ were rewarded with a servant, an American Indian, captured in the war. Depending on their age the captured servants worked a certain time then had their freedom again. The Puritans believed this was an OK arrangement compared to other colonies that killed Indians captured in King Philips War. Through the years John was a carpenter, farmer, tavern keeper and chosen for lots of town services: selectman, treasurer, surveyor, etc. He was also on several committees, even in colonial America there were committees and meetings.

John Whipple's will 1682

John Whipple’s will 1682

John wrote his will May 8, 1682 with all his children named and son Joseph as executor. “Be it known to all persons to whom this may come, that I, John Whipple of the town of Providence, in the colony of Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, in New England (Sen.) being in good measure of health, and in perfect memory, upon consideration of mortality, not knowing the day of my death, and having many children, and to prevent difference that otherwise may hereafter arise among them concerning my worldly estate, do see cause to make my will and do hereby dispose of all my estate in this world and do make my last Will and Testament.”

John died May 16 and is buried in Providence at North Burial Ground. He and Sarah have matching headstones, dated from 1740, not the 1680s.

 

Records of the Governor and company of the Massachusetts Bay, Volume 1 page 100 John Whipple and another in court.

The early records of the town of Providence, Volume 8 page 12 27 who ‘staid’ And Volume 15, page 161 details 

Rhode Island historic cemetery database
http://rihistoriccemeteries.org/newgravedetails.aspx?ID=215026

The early records of the town of Providence Volume 6 page 124-135 John Whipple’s will, inventory, probate.

Joanna Arnold b. 1615

Arnold, Joanna 10th great grandmother on RootsMagic tree.

Joanna was born February 27 1615 in Ilchester, Somerset England. At age 18 she and her family sailed to America. With the Arnolds were Frances and Thomas Hopkins, cousins of Joanna, kids of her aunt and namesake Joane Arnold who stayed in England. The Arnolds and Hopkins cousins were in Hingham Massachusetts near Plymouth for awhile then left for Providence, Rhode Island.

“A family census of Moshassuck and Pawtuxet, for September 1, 1636, would contain the following names: William Arnold, age 49. Christian Arnold, wife of W. A.. Benedict Arnold, son of W. A., 21. Joanna Arnold, daughter of W. A., 18. Stephen Arnold, son of W. A., 14. Thomas Hopkins, nephew of W. A. Frances Hopkins, niece of W. A.”

Map Providence original home lots

Original home lots (annotated)  in The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations by Bicknell.

screenshot copy

Joanna’s mark or seal on husband’s will.

In Providence on June 29,1647 Joanna married Zachariah Rhodes. Zachariah drowned in 1665 and Joanna married Samuel Reape and they stayed in Providence. Joanna and Zachariah had at least 7 children. 4 sons and three daughters who were living when Joanne made her will on January 28 1667. She gifts each of her children 20 pounds.

Joanna is most likely descended from Charlemagne, the King and conqueror. There is a book and a society “Some colonial dames of royal descent” with a pedigree line for Joanne. The book is considered a legitimate source.

Volume 1 page 29. The early records of the town of Providence

Volume 1 page 158 Providence It’s Beginnings. The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Map page 172b

Page 15 Pedigree 2. Some colonial dames of royal descent. Joanna is 3 on this list, the beginning of the pedigree starts on page 11 with: Charlemagne Emperor of the West, King of the Franks and his third wife Lady Hildegarde and so on …

English Origins of New England Families, Second Series, Vol. I [online database] Early Records of the Arnold Family p 2.
Written by William Arnold about his family, Joanna’s brother Benedict was Governor of Rhode Island.