Andrew Howlett and Margaret b. 1726

Andrew Howlett and Margaret 6th great grandparents on RootsMagic tree.

Andrew Howlett was born around 1726. Margaret  -last name unknown, was born around the same time. Both their birthplaces, their parents names aren’t known. Andrew and Margaret  married in 1747 and had 2 sons and 5 daughters, all born in Maryland. It’s likely Andrew fought in the American Revolution. In 1778 he, son James and son in law Henry Crooks all pledged an Oath of Fidelity. At that time men over 16 were required to take this oath, pledging their loyalties to America and not to the King of England. 

Oath of Fidelity and Support
“I do sware I do not hold myself bound to yield any Allegience or obedience to the King of Great Britain his heirs or Successors and that I will be true and faithful to the State of Maryland and will to the utmost of my power, Support maintain and defend the Freedom and Independence thereof and the Government as now established against all open enemies and secret and traterous Conspriaces and will use my utmost endeavours to disclose and make known to the Governor or some one of the Judges or Justices thereof all Treasons or Treaterous Consperaces, attempts or Combinations against this State or the Government thereof which may come to my Knowledge so help me God.”

Andrew and family are on the 1790 US census in Harford County, Maryland, a family of six. In 1800, same location, with a family of seven.  Andrew made two land purchases in 1774: 15 acres which he named Howlett’s Triangle and 60 acres named Howlett’s Ambition.  In 1776 the Howletts lived in an area called Broad Creek Hundred- total population in 1776 was 342 people. An 1803 court record mentions the road “from William Ashmore’s mill for three or four miles towards the Pennsylvania line, near to the dwelling-house of a certain Andrew Howlett, has been found to be convenient and useful to the public”. The court ordered the road on Andrew’s farm be kept up, in good repair for the people.

Margaret died before April 30, 1809 when Andrew wrote his will. Youngest son John got all the lands. Andrew left his daughter and granddaughters money. John Howlett and son in law George Leamon were executors, the will was settled in 1810. Andrew’s inventory included 1 male slave, 17 years old, there in Maryland in 1810.

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Ephraim Child b. 1654

Ephraim Child 9th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Ephraim was born on February 27, 1654 in Roxbury to Benjamin and Mary Bowen Child. He was the first born of 12 children. Ephraim grew up in Roxbury and at age 21 he fought in King Philips War and died in a battle on September 4, 1675.

King Philips War has an incredible history that changes as perceptions change. Metacom, English name King Philip, was the sachem, chief of the Wampanoag tribe following his dad Massasoit who aided and was friendly with the Mayflower Pilgrims. Metacom aided and was friendly with the New England colonists, tensions rose as the colonist moved further on to Wampanoag lands. In January 1675 there was a murder, 3 Wampanoag men were found guilty and hanged, Metacom was rumored to have plotted the murder. Wampanoag and Indians from other tribes began raiding towns, New Englanders gathered into troops and the war began. On both sides 1 of 10 soldiers was killed. On both sides homes, commerce and stored food were destroyed; citizens killed.

Ephraim joined up with Captain Richard Beers. On Friday, September 3, 1675 Captain Beers with thirty-six men headed for Northfield, Massachusetts to rescue townspeople after an attack. They camped overnight and on the morning of September 4 crossed Sawmill Brook where Indians had set up an ambush and the “company was most exposed, was furiously attacked in front and flank, and all were thrown into great confusion, but soon rallied and fought bravely for their lives, but were forced back by superior numbers some three-quarters of a mile to a narrow ravine on the south of a hill now known as Beers s Hill. Here a stand was made, and here the little band fought about their leader, with the courage of desperation, till their ammunition was exhausted and the captain with nearly every man had fallen”.

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Ezekiel and Elizabeth Tubbs b. 1727

Ezekiel and Elizabeth Tubbs, 6th great grandparents on RootsMagic tree

Ezekiel Tubbs was born on July 13, 1727 in New London, Connecticut. He was the youngest of nine kids of Isaac and Martha Smith Tubbs. His family was troubled and his mom had to go to court to get control of lands, or money and support the family because husband Isaac wasn’t. Ezekiel was the 3rd generation of his family born in America, great grandpa William Tubbs left England for America around 1634.

When Ezekiel was about 19 he married Elizabeth. She was from the same area and the same age, that’s all that’s known of her. Ezekiel and Elizabeth had 6 kids, 3 sons and 3 daughters.

Collections of the Connecticut historical society

Ezekiel was a soldier in the French Indian Wars in 1755 to 1759 from about age 28 to age 32. The French and Indian War had 2 sides: colonists from British America against New France (Canada) with American Indian allies on both sides. The War ended with the Treaty of Paris, then more wars followed. In 1778 records show an Ezekiel Tubbs fighting in the Revolutionary War, maybe it was this Ezekiel at age 51 or it could have been a son or nephew, it’s unsure.

Ezekiel and Elizabeth probably died around 1790, probably in New London, Connecticut. Their 3 sons Ananias, Lemuel and Ezekiel fought in the Revolutionary War then married, had families. Daughter Experience married Samuel Cooley. Daughters Elizabeth and Abigail married Gaines brothers. Elizabeth married David, Abigail married Joseph Gaines. Abigail and Joseph, 3rd great grandparents of Faber Miller had a son Obed. Obed traveled to Iowa with his older sons who farmed, started families in Bremer & Butler Counties.

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Samuel Jeffrey and Jane Hanna b. 1750

Samuel Jeffrey and Jane Hanna 5th great grandparents on RootsMagic Tree

Samuel Jeffrey was born in 1750, probably in Pennsylvania, maybe in Ireland or Scotland. HIs parents and past aren’t known. Wife Jane Hanna has even less information, just that she was in the area and about the same age. Samuel and Jane married around 1775 and had 9 kids.

The Jeffreys married near Maryland, then settled in Allegheny County in western Pennsylvania, about 15 miles west of Pittsburgh. In the area, near the towns of Clinton, Moon and Imperial, the Pittsburgh International Airport is there now.

Samuel was in the Revolutionary War with the Chester, Pennsylvania Militia, from 1781-1782. A Pennsylvania Veteran Burial Card shows this info. On December 8, 1786 Samuel and James Brice were on a land deed, they bought 3.4 acres.

Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 at Ancestry

The Jeffrey family is on the 1790 US census which is 9 pages with 5800 total households, heads listed by name, wife and spouse by tick marks. With Samuel and Jana are 3 daughters and 4 sons. On this same census are William Stewart, William Speedy, Henry Crooks, the Howlett and Hanna families- all ancestors of Elizabeth Speedy. Some members of these families traveled west together from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin and a few to Iowa.

In the digital book from 1889, History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, there’s a bio with details on Samuel Jeffrey, “R. W. Jeffrey (Robert Walker Jeffrey b. 1824), farmer, is a grandson of one of the early settlers of Fayette township. Samuel Jeffrey, who was born in Ireland, emigrated to America, locating first in Maryland, but later coming to Allegheny county, where he took up a tract of land from the government.” The ‘born in Ireland, emigrated to America’ part is a maybe, there’s no records to prove this yet.

Samuel died on August 26, 1798. Jane Hanna Jeffrey probably died about the same time. Samuel has a headstone at Montour Cemetery, Oakdale, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The current newer headstone was placed in 1970. Inscribed on the headstone: Samuel Jefferey Sr. Died August 26, 1798 Revolutionary War Veteran Pvt. H? Chester Co. Penna Militia Served Apr 23 1781 to Jan 1, 1782 The Oldest Marked Grave … Cemetery. Jane is probably buried in the same cemetery.

In the same Montour Cemetery other Jeffrey family are buried including Elizabeth Jeffrey Crooks whose daughter Elizabeth Crooks Stewart went all the way to Iowa where her daughter Elizabeth Stewart and husband Manford Speedy had a son Harve Speedy, dad of Elizabeth Speedy .

Sources

  • Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania, Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-2012 at Ancestry
  • History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania at HathiTrust
  • 1790 US Census at FamilySearch

John Connable b. 1749

John Connable 5th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

John Connable was born in 1749 in Bernardston, Massachusetts, the 3rd of 7 kids of Samuel & Mary English Connable. John grew up in Bernardston on the northern edge of Massachusetts and stayed there for most of his life with a short time in Guilford, Vermont a town 10 miles north.

John farmed and owned a sawmill. He was a deer reeve- decided hunting quotas for the community. He was on inspection committees, a surveyor of highways and also built, engineered bridges like his dad Samuel. John was the executor for his dad’s estate and inherited the family home which he passed on to his oldest son Joseph Connable.

Genealogical memoir of the Cunnabell, Conable or Connable family

John and was a private in the Revolutionary War with Colonel Elisha Parker who kept a diary noting orders from General George Washington and from Colonel Benedict Arnold in an expedition to Canada with 1000+ men.

John married 3 times, was a widow twice. He and 2nd wife Sarah Dewey were parents of Leydia Connable who with her husband Obed Gaines went west to Black Hawk County, Iowa in 1854. Leydia and Obed’s son William had a daughter Mary Ella Gaines who married James Miller in Waverly, Iowa. Their son William married Lola and they were the parents of Faber Miller born 1905.

John Connable is buried at Old Cemetery in Bernardston, Massachusetts. His headstone still stands, it’s faded, with this inscription ‘Death is a sweet sonorous sound To those who have salvation found, It wafts them to the courts of bliss, Where all is joy and happiness’.

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Clyde Flood b. 1888

Clyde Flood 1st cousin 3x removed on RootsMagic tree

Clyde William Flood was born in South Dakota on March 6, 1888 to George and Lucy Lewis Flood. He had a younger sister Edith, also born in South Dakota, they returned to Butler County, Iowa when the kids were young. In Butler County Clyde and Edith grew up with their cousins Elmer Angell and Philippa Flood Mockford.

Clyde, Edith and Philippa’s grandma Delia Angell Flood was the sister of Elmer’s dad Charles Angell. The Flood and Angell families would have gotten together for picnics and holidays. Clyde and Elmer Angel were close in age, so were Philippa Mockford and Edith Flood.

Snapshots of Clyde and cousins

Clyde grew up on a farm so he would have helped his mom and dad with chores, planting, crops, livestock. At the 1905 Butler County Fair, Clyde won premiums for flowers he raised including a first place for Dahlias. Clyde and Elmer Angell both fought in World War 1. Clyde enlisted in 1917 and served 17 months in the Iowa 95th Aero Squadron, promoted to Corporal . “The squadron was initially formed in early August 1917 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, where 150 civilians were sworn into the United States Army as soldiers. The newly-sworn in men were sent to Kelly Field, Texas, where they arrived on 19 August and were organized as the 95th Aero Squadron.” Elmer died in the Meuse–Argonne battle, in France, 1918.

Flood, Clyde WW1Clyde came home in May, 1919 via the May 7 Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper. “Chas. Thomsen and Clyde Flood arrived here Sunday morning having received their discharge from the army after service over seas.” Though 1920-21 Clyde was active in getting a Butler County post for the American Legion. December 15, 1921 he was elected Sergeant at Arms. September 25, 1924 via the Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper, “Iving and Milo Isaacson, Clyde Flood and Dave Kramer drove to St Paul the first of the week where they represented the Allison Post of the American Legion at the National Convention. They returned last week and report having a find trip and a mighty good time at the convention”.

He liked cars too. In November 1934 Clyde bought a brand new Chevrolet Coach. April on 1936 he got a new Chevrolet Carry All Suburban.

Flood, Clyde with a trukeyClyde found work at a turkey farm after he returned from the war. Mr. Nicholas, the farm owner, had a broken electric fan. Nichols was ready to throw it away- Clyde was looking for work, asked to look at the fan ‘from an old battery he got enough material to start’ then fix the fan. Clyde stayed at the turkey farm for 20+ years. In 1944 the Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette had a story about the Nicholas farm and all the birds being shipped overseas for the the World War 2 soldiers Thanksgiving Dinner. Clyde is featured in the story, he was 56 in 1944.

Clyde married Mary ‘Mayme’ Noonan June 27, 1941 in Mason City. They married later in life and didn’t have kids and lived at 420 South Fillmore Avenue there’s a Walgreen’s there now. Clyde died January 25, 1950 at The Des Moines Veteran’s Hospital. Mayme died in 1971. Both are buried Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City, Iowa.

Sources

Abraham Bair b. 1784

Abraham Bair 5th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Abraham Bair, born 1784, in Adams, Pennsylvania was the oldest son of Jacob and Barbara Bair who were probably 2nd generation German Americans. By 1810 Abraham was 22 years old and with his family had moved west to Ohio, a state for 7 years, since 1803. On March 31, 1812 Abraham married Elizabeth Harter. A family history book states this was the first marriage in Stark, Ohio. “Tradition says the marriage ceremony of the first couple was: You bromis to take te voman you holt by te hant to pe your vife, and tat you will shtick to her through hell-fire und dunder? Den I bronounce you man and voman, by Got!!,”

Abraham fought in the War of 1812, his pension records show he fought with the Ohio Militia in Captain James Downing’s Company. Abraham and Elizabeth had at least 7 children and lived on a farm. They grew clover, corn, hay, hemp, oats, wheat; produced butter, honey, milk; raised bees, bulls, cows, geese, hens, horses, pigs, sheep.

Bair, Abraham will

Abraham’s 1829 inventory, partial from his estate

Abraham died at age 45 in 1830. His will was dated September 5, 1829. Brother in law Jacob Harter was the administrator. Abraham’s inventory included 2 iron kettles and a Dutch oven, barrels, a weavers loom and gears, a spinning wheel, a plough, a wagon saddle and sheepskin, a black mare, a bay horse, walnut and poplar boards, Dresden ware and a wooden clock with case. The will is several handwritten pages. In 1833 Abraham’s town lot was offered for sale, his children who were still minors, had Abraham’s brothers and brother in laws as guardians, estate managers.
Sources

  • War of 1812 Pension Application Files Index, 1812-1815 at Ancestry
  • Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) 1833 May 17 at Ancestry
  • Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 at Ancestry
  • Ohio county marriages 1789-2013 database at FamilySearch
  • Notes on the Bowman, Harter and Sauer families at FamilySearch

Henry Crooks b. 1743

Henry Crooks 5th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Henry Crooks was born in 1743, probably in Maryland to William and Mary Weir Crooks. In 1768 or so Henry married Jane Howlett. Henry and Jane had 7 kids. By 1786 Henry, his brothers, his wife’s family and other families from Harford County, MD were in Washington County Pennsylvania, a 200 mile journey. They all farmed on land they owned and paid taxes on properties and possessions. The 1798 taxes for Henry show his home, 1 dwelling valued at $20, and 200 acres of land valued at $1620.

Crooks 1798 taxes

Henry was a widow in 1816, he was 73 and lived 25 more years, he died in 1831 at age 88. Henry’s will is at Ancestry . com, a typed up record. He named his children in the will with his son Henry and friend James McAdams as executors.

“In the name of God Amen, I Henry Crooks Senior of Robinson Township in the county of Washington, being in an afflicted state of body, but having a sound mind and understanding (thanks be to the Almighty God for the same) being mindful of my mortality, do make and constitute this my last will and Testament. First and principally, I recommend my immortal Spirit to God who gave it, in hopes of a joyful resurrection, and my body to the earth (when it shall please God to separate my soul and body) to be buried decently at the discretion of my executors. And as to my worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with I give and depose thereof as follows, after my lawful debts and funeral expenses being paid. I do leave and bequeath to my son William Crooks two dollars, to my son Andrew Crooks two dollars, to my son Henry Crooks two dollars to my son John Crooks two dollars to my daughter Jane now wife of John Burns two dollars also to my daughter Mary McKillip two dollars, likewise and all the residue to my daughter Margeret Crooks to be paid to her at the discretion of my executors as to time and manner. I do nominate and appoint my friends James McAdams and Henry Crooks my son to be my executors of this my last will and testament. I publish and declare this and none other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five.
Henry Crooks Sr (Seal)
Signed and sealed in the presnece of John R McEwen, John Crooks,
Washington County ss: Be it remembered, that on the 21st day of March A D 1831 Before William Hoge Deputy Register”

Sources

John Kryder b. 1736

John Kryder 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in France, Germany or Pennsylvania on or around April 22, 1736, sources vary. By 1767 he was definitely in Pennsylvania where he married Ann Maria Fuchs or Fox. John and Ann had at least 5 children born between 1768 and 1775 in the area of Lancaster, PA.

John and family were part of the German American Pennsylvania community. During the American Revolution they were in the Big Runaway of 1778: “The Big Runaway was a mass evacuation in June and July 1778 of settlers from the frontier areas of what is now north central Pennsylvania during the American Revolutionary War.” The locals knew of the dangers because of the war, had requested aid: rifles, armed men from the Continental Congress, none of it arrived in time. So everyone fled with livestock and whatever possessions they could carry. Books and movies could be made about this one event, it’s huge and lasted through 1779 when the American gov’t committed more aid to “security of the frontier”.

Kryder John bacon and beef soldJohn sold bacon and beef to the Continental Army during the American Revolution. His neighbor George Marquart had the mutton and Jacob Yeiser provided the brandy. At some point John fought in the American Revolution. There’s no military records yet, but his headstones recognize his service in the American Revolution and the French Indian Wars. John has a headstone probably original from his death in 1803 and then a newer marker which his descendants set out out in 1994.

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Thomas Glenn b. 1766

Thomas Glenn 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Thomas Glenn was born on March 4, 1766 in Pennsylvania. His parents were probably Thomas and Elizabeth, newly discovered ancestors, maybe from Coleraine, County Londonderry, Ireland, not a lot of facts and records yet.

Thomas Glenn married Jane Bromfield on May 12, 1789 in Cumberland, PA at the Presbyterian church. Presbyterians trace their origin to Britain, mostly Scotland. Thomas and Nancy probably had 10-12 children and farmed in Island Creek, Jefferson County, Ohio, eastern Ohio, near the Ohio River. Thomas fought in the War of 1812, a major in Andrews Regiment, Ohio Militia. He paid taxes in Island Creek, real and personal estate, with tax records from 1816 to 1838. There was a cholera epidemic in Ohio that began in 1830. Both Thomas and his daughter Elizabeth died of cholera. Thomas was 82, Elizabeth was 55.
The 1850 US census mortality schedule database proving Thomas and Elizabeth’s deaths is little morbid but packed with family history information and at the bottom, a note of about the crops, land soil and cholera in the area. “The above township is well adapted to raising wheat crop, oats and indeed almost kind of product common to this country. The land is rolling but little broken rich and fertile soil mostly limestone. Wheat and apple crop … in 1849 of the farmers … our third crops better … the cholera carried off many of the citizens in 1849” Some of the note is unreadable.

Glenn, Thomas and Elizabeth 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas Glenn and daughter Elizabeth Speedy 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas is buried at Island Creek Cemetery in Toronto, Jefferson County, Ohio, in the “Pioneer Section”. Wife Nancy and daughter Elizabeth Glenn Speedy are in the same cemetery. Elizabeth Glenn married William Speedy and their son Manford with his uncle Alexander Glenn was in Iowa by 1856. William Speedy joined them in Iowa by 1870.
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