Benjamin English b. 1705

Benjamin English 7th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born February 3, 1705 in New Haven Connecticut, British America. He lived through the early days of the Revolutionary War and died towards the end of it, murdered in the Invasion of New Haven. This July 5, 1779 invasion is in lots of sources. Benjamin’s daughter in law Abigail provided a first hand account of his death in court. It’s sad and tragic but makes a reader appreciate all that went in to making America a free country 240 years ago.

Map of Hew Haven invasion

Drawing of 1779 Jul 5 invasion of New Haven

Benjamin was named after his dad, the 2nd of seven children. He married Sarah Dayton, “Benjamin English and Sarah Daton both of New Haven were Joined in marriage to Each other the 25th day of Sept:1735 Isaac Dickerman Justice of Peace.” Benjamin and Sarah stayed in New Haven and had at least 5 children. They named their first son Benjamin, he was s a Captain in King Philips War.

Sources

John Speedy b. 1825

John Speedy 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree

John was the 2nd son of Thomas and Elizabeth Glenn Speedy, the older brother of Manford Speedy. John was born in 1825 in Jefferson County, Ohio. He grew up on a farm. On March 8, 1855 he married Jane Foulks, a sister of his his older brother Thomas’s wife. John and Jane farmed and had 4 kids. The 1850 US agricultural census shows John Speedy’s farm: 40 acres of improved land, 18  acres of unimproved, $1650 cash value of farm, $ 85 cash value of machinery,  2 horses, 5 cows,13 sheep, 5 pigs, $ 250 value of livestock; produced 200 bushels of wheat, 300 bushels of Indian corn,  200 bushels of oats, 158 lb. of wool, 20 lb. of Irish potatoes, 200 lb. of butter, 2 tons of hay.

In 1863 John was 38 and was drafted or signed up for the Civil War. He fought with the Ohio 157th Infantry Company K, he was a Private. The 157th Infantry reported to Columbus, Ohio for duty on May 15, 1864, one of the’ Hundred Days’ Men’. The infantry went from Columbus, Ohio to Baltimore then on to guard Fort Delaware on the Delaware River south of Philadelphia. A Major Eames wrote, “Our journey from Columbus to Baltimore was tedious but full of interest. All along the route we were saluted with cheers and smiles and waving of handkerchiefs and flags from early dawn to long after sunset. Never in all my campaigning have I seen anything to compare with those manifestations of rejoicing for the promptness of the 100 day men of Ohio”. At Fort Delaware the soldiers were guarding Confederate prisoners of war. When not on duty John probably watched ships sailing and fished. “The heavy shipping traffic on the Delaware River was a source of fascination to the farm boys from Ohio, who would sit and watch the steamers, side-wheelers, ironclads and fishing boats for hours”. Fort Delaware is where John died. He and 9 others died from disease. 

Speedy, John in 157th Ohio Infantry

John Speedy, 157th Ohio Company K

Sources

 

 

Samuel Hill b. 1652

Samuel Hill 8th great grandpa on RoostMagic

Samuel was born in 1652 in Malden, Massachusetts son of Joesph Hill and second wife Hannah Smith. Joseph, his dad, was well known in Malden: a lawyer, town rep, deputy etc. Samuel fought in King Philips war between 1675-79 in Captain Brocklebank’s command and may have been a Sergeant. On May 20, 1679 in Newbury, Massachusetts on the coast, about 40 miles northeast of Malden, Samuel married Abigail Wheeler.

Hills, Samuel and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

Samuel Hill and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

They stayed in Newbury and had more than 10 children. On August 5, 1732 Samuel was 80 years and wrote his will. ‘Weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, the mortality of my body … give and command my soul to the hands of God that give it’.  Samuel’s will mentioned his wife Abigail, then listed his children. His inventory included silver, books, armor, pewter, earthenware, Indian and English corn, barrels and casks and Cooper’s tools to make barrels and casks. Samuel is buried in Bridge Street Cemetery in Newbury his headstone is still there.

Sources

Elmer Angell b. 1890

Elmer Angell 2nd cousin 3 times removed on RootsMagic tree

Angell, Elmer Honor Roll

Private Elmer Angell

Elmer was born February 17 1890, the first and only child of Leander and Nancy Trobaugh Angell. On the 1900 US census Elmer was 10 years old, and in school. On the 1910 census he was a laborer and worked odd jobs with 0 weeks of not working. In 1917 Elmer was 27 and drafted in to World War 1. Elmer registered in June of 1917, with all men between the ages of 21 and 31. The draft card has a description: single with no dependents, automobile mechanic by trade, unemployed, medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair’.  In August of 1917 Elmer married Ella Tibbits in Albert Lea, Minnesota.

Elmer was one of the ’73 Registrants to Answer Roll Call in Allison’, to fill the quota from Butler County printed in the February 20 1918 Iowa (Greene) Recorder. The front page shows the 73, gives some facts about the 6,000,000 + men already dead in the war and includes SCHOOL NOTES: The High School are observing Na­tional Song Week by singing ‘America’ and ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ whenever the entire student body are together.

Angell, Elmer drafted

1918 February 20, 73 from Butler County, Iowa are drafted.

Tibbits, Ella M

Photo of Ella Tibbits Angell at Find a Grave.

Five days later on Feb. 25 there was a patriotic rally. In May of 1918 Elmer was in Camp Logan Illinois, then in France by May, 1918. Private Angell served with Company D, 129th Infantry, of the 33rd Division. The 33rd Division was part of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Elmer was one of 26,277 American soldiers killed in this battle. He died in France. His funeral was December 18, 1918 with burial (some time later) in Antioch Cemetery in Clarksville, Iowa.

Online
Iowa (Greene) recorder, Digital Archives
1918 Feb 20 page 1 of 8, column 3 top drafted

Ella Mayzell Tibbits and Elmer Angell at at FindAGrave

At HathiTrust
An honor roll containing a pictorial record of the gallant About page 19

 

 

 

Ludwig Freyburger b. 1743

Ludwig Freyburger 6th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Ludwig Freyburger was born in 1743 in Baden, Germany. He arrived in America on ‘The Hero’ October 27, 1764 and took an oath to the ‘Province and State of Pennsylvania’. He probably fought in the American Revolution, shown by a marker at his headstone, no records found yet to prove this. In 1786 he paid taxes in Northumberland, Pennsylvania on: 50 acres of land, 1 horse, 2 cows, valued at  $13, state tax was 0 pounds 2 shillings 2 pence. In 1790 he is on the country’s first federal census living in Northumberland. PA with his wife, 4 sons and 2 daughters. Ludwig and family moved to Goshen, Ohio around 1800. Ludwig died there in 1802 and is buried in Myers Cemetery, Goshen, Ohio. His headstone has him as the first burial in this cemetery. He shares a headstone with his wife Mary. There are several Freyburgers buried in this cemetery.

Sources

  • Names of foreigners who took the oath at HathiTrust. Page 466 List of foreigners imported in the ship Hero Capt. Ralph Forster from Rotterdam last from Cowes. Qualified Oct 27, 1764 [30 – Vol XVII random?], Ludwig Frieburger, page 466 right column 4th name. 
  • Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801 at Ancestry. 1786 Northumberland Penn image 83 of 111 Penns. on Ancestry.
  • Find a Grave memorial 20297018
  • 1790 census at FamilySearch.org. FHL 0568149 Digital Folder 005157141 Image 00298 (43 of 53). Ludwick Freyberger, Northumberland, Pennsylvania, United States; citing p. 80, NARA microfilm publication M637, roll 9

John Angell b. 1646

John Angell 9th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John was born in 1646 in Providence, Rhode Island. Ten years earlier the 1636 census recorded 25 families total living there. In 1667 John was 21, he swore allegiance to King Charles with other men, a common thing. A couple months later there’s an issue when he and 2 others are accused by a constable. John Angell, John Field (future brother in law) and Resolved Waterman (future in law) were walking back home after mowing a meadow when they’re charged with disturbing the peace and put in jail. The whole town thought John and the others were wrongly accused by an inept constable. Their case came to court “We pray this honrd Assembly to provide by Some order yt ye Kings Name and Authoritie be not so cheape and base, as to be made a stalking horse to Mens private Ends and passions Nor his Majties Subjects so oppressed in thejr persons and Liberties Yor humble srvants and petitioiners ye Towne of Providence, on our vsual quarter day in his Majties Name assembled July 27, 1667 So-Calld”.

In 1669 John married Ruth Field they stayed in Providence, John was a weaver and held different town offices. He was part of King Philips War serving under Captain Daniel Henchman and in Dedham, Massachusetts on July 7 1675 the soldiers put their war on hold to watch the lunar eclipse, the moon turning deep red, lasting about an hour.

In the Thomas Angell genealogy book, John Angell is described as a strong man, a great grandson tells this story, “My great grandfather, John, was said to be a man of enormous strength, having on one occasion nine bushels of pears on his old mare, and she would not carry them, he took them on his own back and carried them, which seems, incredible. He said he once attempted to carry four bushels of salt up stairs, but the stairs broke down and he was injured by the fall.”
May 30 1667 Alegance to his Majestye
Volume 3 page 102 The early records of the town of Providence

Oath of allegiance
Page 10, Oaths of allegiance in colonial New England, by Charles Evans

Be not so cheap and base as a smokescreen into men’s private affairs and liberties
Volume 15 page 115, The early records of the town of Providence

Volume 37 Page 65 The New England historical and genealogical register 1883 Volume 37

Lunar eclipse 1675

Page 13 Genealogy of the descendants of Thomas Angell

Rhode Island Indian Rock, Narragansett Pier, Detroit Photographic Co., c1900, photochrom, color Library of Congress

William Knapp b. 1809

William Knapp b. 1809. 3rd great grandfather

William is the father of Charlotte Knapp who is probably the mother of William Cable. William Knapp was born in New York and married Rhoda Bower at age 20. William and Rhoda lived in Orange County, New York until about 1849, when they left for Dane County, Wisconsin where Rhoda’s brothers and sisters had settled. Rhoda died soon after arriving in Dane, Wisconsin in 1850. The Knapp children were in their teens and 20s when their mom died. William may have drifted or may have stayed in Wisconsin with the Bowers.

In 1864 William enlisted as a private in the 129th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Company K. The 129th was right there in Atlanta September of 1864 when the city was burned then occupied by the troops. William was a Union soldier until June, 1865 and fought battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, Atlanta and Raleigh, North Carolina.

William’s next residence record is the 1880 US census, he’s in Charles City, Iowa a gardener living on his own. Five years later the Iowa 1885 census shows him living with his daughter Charlotte Knapp Cable and family including grandson William Cable. William’s final home was in Marshalltown, Iowa in what was then the Iowa Soldiers Home. He may have lived in one of the small cottages. William died at age 79 on January 1, 1889 and is buried at the Iowa Veterans Home Cemetery.
Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, 1879-1903 at Ancestry . com.
William d. 1 Jan 1889 in Marshalltown, Iowa, USA, Pvt. regiment 129, company K, unit Illinois Infantry

Civil War soldiers and sailors system (CWSS) at National Parks Service
https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-battle-units-detail.htm?battleUnitCode=UIL0129RI