Henry Crooks b. 1743

Henry Crooks 5th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Henry Crooks was born in 1743, probably in Maryland to William and Mary Weir Crooks. In 1768 or so Henry married Jane Howlett. Henry and Jane had 7 kids. By 1786 Henry, his brothers, his wife’s family and other families from Harford County, MD were in Washington County Pennsylvania, a 200 mile journey. They all farmed on land they owned and paid taxes on properties and possessions. The 1798 taxes for Henry show his home, 1 dwelling valued at $20, and 200 acres of land valued at $1620.

Crooks 1798 taxes

Henry was a widow in 1816, he was 73 and lived 25 more years, he died in 1831 at age 88. Henry’s will is at Ancestry . com, a typed up record. He named his children in the will with his son Henry and friend James McAdams as executors.

“In the name of God Amen, I Henry Crooks Senior of Robinson Township in the county of Washington, being in an afflicted state of body, but having a sound mind and understanding (thanks be to the Almighty God for the same) being mindful of my mortality, do make and constitute this my last will and Testament. First and principally, I recommend my immortal Spirit to God who gave it, in hopes of a joyful resurrection, and my body to the earth (when it shall please God to separate my soul and body) to be buried decently at the discretion of my executors. And as to my worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with I give and depose thereof as follows, after my lawful debts and funeral expenses being paid. I do leave and bequeath to my son William Crooks two dollars, to my son Andrew Crooks two dollars, to my son Henry Crooks two dollars to my son John Crooks two dollars to my daughter Jane now wife of John Burns two dollars also to my daughter Mary McKillip two dollars, likewise and all the residue to my daughter Margeret Crooks to be paid to her at the discretion of my executors as to time and manner. I do nominate and appoint my friends James McAdams and Henry Crooks my son to be my executors of this my last will and testament. I publish and declare this and none other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five.
Henry Crooks Sr (Seal)
Signed and sealed in the presnece of John R McEwen, John Crooks,
Washington County ss: Be it remembered, that on the 21st day of March A D 1831 Before William Hoge Deputy Register”

Sources

John Kryder b. 1736

John Kryder 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in France, Germany or Pennsylvania on or around April 22, 1736, sources vary. By 1767 he was definitely in Pennsylvania where he married Ann Maria Fuchs or Fox. John and Ann had at least 5 children born between 1768 and 1775 in the area of Lancaster, PA.

John and family were part of the German American Pennsylvania community. During the American Revolution they were in the Big Runaway of 1778: “The Big Runaway was a mass evacuation in June and July 1778 of settlers from the frontier areas of what is now north central Pennsylvania during the American Revolutionary War.” The locals knew of the dangers because of the war, had requested aid: rifles, armed men from the Continental Congress, none of it arrived in time. So everyone fled with livestock and whatever possessions they could carry. Books and movies could be made about this one event, it’s huge and lasted through 1779 when the American gov’t committed more aid to “security of the frontier”.

Kryder John bacon and beef soldJohn sold bacon and beef to the Continental Army during the American Revolution. His neighbor George Marquart had the mutton and Jacob Yeiser provided the brandy. At some point John fought in the American Revolution. There’s no military records yet, but his headstones recognize his service in the American Revolution and the French Indian Wars. John has a headstone probably original from his death in 1803 and then a newer marker which his descendants set out out in 1994.

Sources

Thomas Glenn b. 1766

Thomas Glenn 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Thomas Glenn was born on March 4, 1766 in Pennsylvania. His parents were probably Thomas and Elizabeth, newly discovered ancestors, maybe from Coleraine, County Londonderry, Ireland, not a lot of facts and records yet.

Thomas Glenn married Jane Bromfield on May 12, 1789 in Cumberland, PA at the Presbyterian church. Presbyterians trace their origin to Britain, mostly Scotland. Thomas and Nancy probably had 10-12 children and farmed in Island Creek, Jefferson County, Ohio, eastern Ohio, near the Ohio River. Thomas fought in the War of 1812, a major in Andrews Regiment, Ohio Militia. He paid taxes in Island Creek, real and personal estate, with tax records from 1816 to 1838. There was a cholera epidemic in Ohio that began in 1830. Both Thomas and his daughter Elizabeth died of cholera. Thomas was 82, Elizabeth was 55.
The 1850 US census mortality schedule database proving Thomas and Elizabeth’s deaths is little morbid but packed with family history information and at the bottom, a note of about the crops, land soil and cholera in the area. “The above township is well adapted to raising wheat crop, oats and indeed almost kind of product common to this country. The land is rolling but little broken rich and fertile soil mostly limestone. Wheat and apple crop … in 1849 of the farmers … our third crops better … the cholera carried off many of the citizens in 1849” Some of the note is unreadable.

Glenn, Thomas and Elizabeth 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas Glenn and daughter Elizabeth Speedy 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas is buried at Island Creek Cemetery in Toronto, Jefferson County, Ohio, in the “Pioneer Section”. Wife Nancy and daughter Elizabeth Glenn Speedy are in the same cemetery. Elizabeth Glenn married William Speedy and their son Manford with his uncle Alexander Glenn was in Iowa by 1856. William Speedy joined them in Iowa by 1870.
Sources

Kathlyn, Lora, Raymond Perry b. 1920s

Lora, Kathlyn and Raymond Perry 2nd cousins 1x removed.

1940 Des Moines, Iowa

Gladys’s mom Mary Fries and the Perry kids’s grandma Lora Fries were sisters. Lora married John Jackson they had a daughter Pearl Irene Jackson. Pearl married Roy Perry and they had 2 daughters Lora and Kathlyn and a son Raymond. Gladys Cable was the aunt of the Perry kids and just a couple years older. They all grew up together in Pleasant Grove near Greene, Iowa. By 1940 the Perry family was in Des Moines where Roy was the manager and Pearl a cone maker at Krispy Homemade Kones owned by Ewing Lambert, brother to Gladys Cable, cousin to Pearl, uncle to the Perry kids. IN 1940 Kathryn and Lora were students at the American Schools of Business, Raymond was 17 and still in high school.

In 1941 all 3 enlisted in the Army. Raymond enlisted  December 30, 1941 and stayed in the Army until at least 1958 when he was Captain of the Transportation Corps, probably in Oregon. He died in 2013.

Perry, Lora and Kathlyn 1942 WAC graduating class

Kathlyn and Lora enlisted too, in the new Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps WAAC, later WAC. Lora enlisted August 24,1942 and Kathlyn enlisted September 9, 1942. Fort Des Moines, Iowa was the first WAAC training camp, it opened in July 1942. WAAC soldiers were pioneers, the program was phased out in the 1970s when soldiers were soldiers no matter the gender. Lora was probably in that first graduating class, Kathryn in a following class.

Lora and Kathlyn’s military service is harder to trace. Lora was probably still in the Army until as late as August 1956 when she was on a crew list flying from NY to Frankfort Germany. There’s no further detail on Kathryn’s service, yet. Lora married Donnally Langston, they lived in California. Kathlyn married Howard Manley and also lived in California. Lora died in 2004, Kathlyn in 2000. Both are buried in Sierra Hills Memorial Park Sacramento, California.

Sources

William Speedy b. 1783

William Speedy 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

William Speedy was born in 1783 in Pennsylvania. His parents aren’t known. He probably grew up in Pennsylvania then left for Ohio where he fought in the War of 1812.

Speedy, William on War of 1812 roster

War of 1812 Roster

On April 13, 1823 he married Elizabeth Glenn. He and Elizabeth had 6 sons Thomas, John, James, Clark, William and Manford. The Speedys lived in Jefferson County, Ohio near the Ohio River. William’s farm in 1850 had 100 acres of improved land, 100 acres of unimproved land, a cash value of $1000 and $200 worth of tools and machinery. Livestock on the farm included 5 horse, 2 milking cows, 2 cattle, 20 pigs valued at $450. the farm produced 500 bushels of wheat, 100 bushels bushels of Indian corn, 20 pounds of Irish potatoes, 300 lbs of butter, 8 tons of hay and 3 bushels of clover seed.

William was a widow in 1850, his wife Elizabeth and her dad Thomas Glenn died in the cholera epidemic in Ohio. By 1856 William’s younger sons Clark and Manford were in Shell Rock, Iowa living with Thomas Hall, son of Mary Glenn Hall- Elizabeth Glenn Speedy’s sister. William joined his sons in 1870 and lived with Manford and his family in Iowa. William died in 1872 he was 83 years old.

William is buried at Riverside Cemetery in Shell Rock Iowa. One of 7 Speedys in that cemetery. Annie Coates Speedy, 1st wife of Manford, their 4 children who died young Bertha, Blanche, Eda and Julet and Clark Speedy, son of William, brother to Manford.

Andrew and Manford Speedy cousins

William Speedy is somehow related to Allen Speedy born in Ireland or Scotland in about 1726. I haven’t found any records showing this connection only my DNA results which show Allen Speedy’s descendants as ‘half 4th cousins’. Allen Speedy b. 1726, a cousin or uncle of William Speedy, were both living in Pennsylvania and then in Jefferson County, Ohio. Allen Speedy had a son Andrew, 13 years younger than William, photo shows Andrew Speedy’s family. The 1820 census in Jefferson County Wisconsin shows Allen and William Speedy as neighbors.

Sources

James Hill b. 1726

James Hill 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

James was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts on April 26, 1726. He was the youngest of 8 kids of Samuel and Ann Brown Hill. James married Eunice Walker, “James and Eunice Walker, both of Rehoboth, married by Rev. John Greenwood May 11, 1749. Int. April 13, 1749” is recorded in Vital Record of Rehoboth. James was a farmer and a blacksmith. He was a widow in 1772 and fought in the American Revolution from 1775 to 1779.

James’s first battle was on April 19, 1775 that was the day Paul Revere and others rode through the countryside warning towns and soldiers that the British Army was on the move. A Sons of the American Revolution SAR application was completed and verified in 1930 and lists the details of James’s service. Horace Hills completed this SAR application in 1930, verified as correct because of James’s Hill(s) age and location. Horace Hills lived at the same time as Philippa Mockford Speedy, they were 5th cousins.

Hills, James 1802 will with signature

Signature on 1802 will

James Hills left a will with all his children listed including Cynthia Hill Angell 3rd great grandma of Elizabeth Speedy. In 1802, the year he died, “My daughter Cynthia wife of Asa Angell …all my estate both real and personal not herein before disposed … after paying my just debts … equally divided.” Some of James’s inventory: 1 black straight woolen coat, waistcoats and breeches, hat, mittens, caps and glove, bedstead, flannel sheets, tablecloths, linen sheet, 1 sword and belt, butter mold, ladle, candle stand, bible, silver drinking cup, iron teaspoons, teapot, crockery, chairs, tables, farming tools, blacksmith tools, livestock, dwelling house, corn barn, 10 acres of land.

Sources

Benjamin English b. 1705

Benjamin English 7th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Benjamin was born February 3, 1705 in New Haven Connecticut, British America. He lived through the early days of the Revolutionary War and died towards the end of it, murdered in the Invasion of New Haven. This July 5, 1779 invasion is in lots of sources. Benjamin’s daughter in law Abigail provided a first hand account of his death in court. It’s sad and tragic but makes a reader appreciate all that went in to making America a free country 240 years ago.

Map of Hew Haven invasion

Drawing of 1779 Jul 5 invasion of New Haven

Benjamin was named after his dad, the 2nd of seven children. He married Sarah Dayton, “Benjamin English and Sarah Daton both of New Haven were Joined in marriage to Each other the 25th day of Sept:1735 Isaac Dickerman Justice of Peace.” Benjamin and Sarah stayed in New Haven and had at least 5 children. They named their first son Benjamin, he was s a Captain in King Philips War.

Sources

John Speedy b. 1825

John Speedy 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic tree

John was the 2nd son of Thomas and Elizabeth Glenn Speedy, the older brother of Manford Speedy. John was born in 1825 in Jefferson County, Ohio. He grew up on a farm. On March 8, 1855 he married Jane Foulks, a sister of his his older brother Thomas’s wife. John and Jane farmed and had 4 kids. The 1850 US agricultural census shows John Speedy’s farm: 40 acres of improved land, 18  acres of unimproved, $1650 cash value of farm, $ 85 cash value of machinery,  2 horses, 5 cows,13 sheep, 5 pigs, $ 250 value of livestock; produced 200 bushels of wheat, 300 bushels of Indian corn,  200 bushels of oats, 158 lb. of wool, 20 lb. of Irish potatoes, 200 lb. of butter, 2 tons of hay.

In 1863 John was 38 and was drafted or signed up for the Civil War. He fought with the Ohio 157th Infantry Company K, he was a Private. The 157th Infantry reported to Columbus, Ohio for duty on May 15, 1864, one of the’ Hundred Days’ Men’. The infantry went from Columbus, Ohio to Baltimore then on to guard Fort Delaware on the Delaware River south of Philadelphia. A Major Eames wrote, “Our journey from Columbus to Baltimore was tedious but full of interest. All along the route we were saluted with cheers and smiles and waving of handkerchiefs and flags from early dawn to long after sunset. Never in all my campaigning have I seen anything to compare with those manifestations of rejoicing for the promptness of the 100 day men of Ohio”. At Fort Delaware the soldiers were guarding Confederate prisoners of war. When not on duty John probably watched ships sailing and fished. “The heavy shipping traffic on the Delaware River was a source of fascination to the farm boys from Ohio, who would sit and watch the steamers, side-wheelers, ironclads and fishing boats for hours”. Fort Delaware is where John died. He and 9 others died from disease. 

Speedy, John in 157th Ohio Infantry

John Speedy, 157th Ohio Company K

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Samuel Hill b. 1652

Samuel Hill 8th great grandpa on RoostMagic tree.

Samuel was born in 1652 in Malden, Massachusetts son of Joesph Hill and second wife Hannah Smith. Samuel’s dad Joseph, was well known in Malden: a lawyer, town rep, deputy etc. Samuel fought in King Philips war between 1675-79 in Captain Brocklebank’s command and may have been a sergeant. In Newbury, Massachusetts on the coast, about 40 miles northeast of Malden, Samuel married Abigail Wheeler on May 20, 1679.

Hills, Samuel and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

Samuel Hill and Abigail Wheeler marriage 1679

Samuel and Abigail stayed in Newbury and had more than 10 children. On August 5, 1732 Samuel was 80 years old and wrote his will. ‘Weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, the mortality of my body … give and command my soul to the hands of God that give it’.  Samuel’s will mentioned his widow Abigail and  listed his children. His inventory included silver, books, armor, pewter, earthenware, Indian and English corn, barrels and casks and cooper’s tools to make barrels and casks. Samuel is buried in Bridge Street Cemetery in Newbury, Massachusetts, his headstone is still there.

Sources

Elmer Angell b. 1890

Elmer Angell 2nd cousin 3 times removed on RootsMagic tree

Angell, Elmer Honor Roll

Private Elmer Angell

Elmer was born February 17 1890, the first and only child of Leander and Nancy Trobaugh Angell. On the 1900 US census Elmer was 10 years old, and in school. On the 1910 census he was a laborer and worked odd jobs with 0 weeks of not working. In 1917 Elmer was 27 and drafted in to World War 1. Elmer registered in June of 1917, with all men between the ages of 21 and 31. The draft card description: single with no dependents, automobile mechanic by trade, unemployed, medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair.  In August of 1917 Elmer married Ella Tibbits in Albert Lea, Minnesota.

Elmer was one of the ’73 Registrants to Answer Roll Call in Allison’, to fill the quota from Butler County printed in the February 20 1918 Iowa (Greene) Recorder. The front page shows the 73, gives some facts about the 6,000,000 + men already dead in the war and includes SCHOOL NOTES: The High School are observing Na­tional Song Week by singing ‘America’ and ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ whenever the entire student body are together.

Angell, Elmer drafted

Tibbits, Ella M

Ella Tibbits Angell 

Five days later on Feb. 25 there was a patriotic rally. In May of 1918 Elmer was in Camp Logan Illinois, then in France by May, 1918. Private Angell served with Company D, 129th Infantry, of the 33rd Division. The 33rd Division was part of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in France. Elmer was one of 26,277 American soldiers killed in this battle. His funeral was December 18, 1918 with burial (some time later) in Antioch Cemetery in Clarksville, Iowa.

Sources

  • Iowa (Greene) recorder, Digital Archives
    1918 Feb 20 page 1 of 8, column 3 top drafted
  • Photo via An honor roll containing a pictorial record of the gallant About page 19 
  • Minnesota county marriages 1860-1949 database with images at FamilySearch

  • 1910 United States Federal Census at Ancestry

  • Ella Tibbits photo, Public Ancestry.com photo Added by: K. Pike.