Leydia Connable b. 1795

Leydia Connable 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.
Leydia Connable was born in Bernardston, Massachusetts on April 23 1795. She was the third of John and Sarah Dewey Connable’s 8 kids. She also had 5 siblings from her dad’s first marriage. Leydia married Obed Gaines in 1815. They have 2 marriage records. One dated August 10 and another dated September 23. The August record was probably an ‘intention of marriage’.

By 1820 Leydia and Obed had 5 kids, 3 of them triplets. So Leydia was caring for 3 infants, a 2 year old and a 4 year old- all at the same time! The 1820, 1840 and 1850 censuses show Leydia and family in Cazenovia, New York, then Steuben, Indiana, then Van Buren, Indiana. Leydia’s 6th child William Gaines, great grandpa of Faber Miller, was in Bremer County, Iowa in 1850. In 1854, probably in August, most likely in a covered wagon with a coupe horses, Leydia, husband and 2 kids made the 500 mile trip to Iowa. They would have traveled 10-20 miles per day probably for about 37 days. When the family entered Iowa they’d traveled 1,200 miles and 6 states.

Connable, Leydia d.1854

Headstone Leydia wife of Obid Gaines

A Connable family history book tells that Leydia died of cholera October 23, 1854. Her death date is verified in Iowa Cemetery Records. She is buried in Old Barclay Cemetery near Dunkerton, Iowa. Leydia is the only Gaines buried in the cemetery. Her family would have arranged a funeral, buried Lydia, then kept moving on to son William’s location about 50 mile north near Plainfield, Iowa. When Leydia was buried in 1854 Iowa was 80% native prairie. Barclay township was founded in August 1854, so the town was just beginning when Leydia was buried there.

John Connable b. 1650

John Connable 8th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Connable was born in England about 1650 or so. An Ancestry source “US Craftperson Files 1600-1995” shows his occupation as carpenter, joiner, artisan. This craftsman source leads to a 30 page paper “The Seventeenth Century Case Furniture of Essex County, Massachusetts, and Its Makers”. Author Benno Forman researched ‘the origins of the joined chest of drawers’ in early America. The conclusion, “only one man John Cunnable could have brought this style to Boston’. The author includes the ‘Garvan’ chest at Yale’s Art Gallery as evidence.

Connable chest of drawers

The Garvan chest at Yale

Connable, John joiner

Then only one man, John Connable, could have brought the style to New England.

Connable, John signature

John Cunabell, joiner of London

Besides his skills in woodworking John married 3 times, had a large family, fought in King Philips War, took the Oath of Allegiance, was a freeman and for several years a ’tithing man’ responsible for arresting travelers on Sunday – travel was forbidden on the Sabbath.

His death is recorded in a diary of the time, “10. On ye 10 in ye morning about 5 old Mr. Connabell, ye joiner, dyed and buryed on ye 13 day aged 74 years 3 months 15 days”.

Online
The Garvan chest at Yale Art Gallery

The article Seventeenth Century Case Furniture
image 14 of 31
Catalog page http://www.jstor.org/stable/1180998?origin=JSTOR-pdf

“The drawers of the Garvan chest and the SPNEA chest (fig. to), in contrast to those in all the joined furniture known to have been made elsewhere in Massachusetts before 1675, are held together with dovetails, as opposed to the usual, rural Anglo-American technique of nailing flushcut drawer sides into rabbets planed into the sides of the drawer fronts”

At Archive.org
Volume 15 page 201 Diary of Jeremiah Bumstead of Boston 1722-1727 in The New England historical and genealogical register 1861 Volume 15.

At Ancestry
U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995

At HathiTrust
Volume 1 page 9 several pages. Genealogical memoir of the Cunnabell, Conable or Connable family.

Joseph Connable b. 1782

Joseph Connable b. 1782 3rd great uncle to Faber Miller who married Gladys Cable.

Connable, Joseph

Jospeh was born in Bernardston Massachusetts to John Connable and first wife Amey Edwards. Jospeh married Mary Polly Maxwell and was a farmer. In 1813 his dad died and Jospeh inherited the estate and became guardian to his younger siblings. In 1837 Jospeh, his wife and his brother Samuel moved to Xenia, Ohio where they spent the rest of their lives and farmed. Jospeh believed strongly in 2 things: drinking alcohol was wrong and owning slaves was a sin.  And he was somewhat famous for his gardening skills, “published in the Franklin Herald of Nov .12, 1816: An English mammoth turnip was raised by Joseph Connable of Bernardston measuring forty-six inches round the middle and weighed thirty pounds with top and twenty-three pounds without top.”

 

Mary Connable b. 1747

Mary Connable 3rd great aunt to Faber Miller who married Gladys Cable.

Mary Connable was born in Bernardston, Massachusetts to Samuel and Mary English Connable. “She was one of the school teachers of Bernardston. Sept. 29, 1774, the town paid her L1 15s. for keeping school.” Page 354 History of the Town of Bernardston by Kellog . Mary is noted for being “a remarkably ingenious, enterprising and industrious woman.” She built a water wheel near her home and could spin five ‘run’ maybe pounds?, of linen in a day. Mary stayed single and lived her whole life in the home she grew up in which her brother John and then nephew Joseph, inherited with a room given to Mary: the south lower room “so long as she shall live single, or be disposed to reside at my house.” Her will was written June 18, 1818. Mary left $1 to each niece and nephew, $10 to sister Elizabeth, with land and possessions for her nephew Joseph. She signed the will.

Mary’s brother John Connable (1749 – 1813)
Leydia Connable (1795 – 1854)
William Newcomb Gaines (1825 – 1907)
Mary Ella Gaines (1855 – 1917)
William Earl Miller (1879 – 1949)
Faber W Miller (1905 – 1957) m. Gladys Cable (1913 – 1991)