Timothy Walker b. 1687

Timothy Walker 7th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Timothy Walker was born on September 14, 1687 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts to Samuel and Martha Ide Walker. Timothy’s 4 grandparents came to America from England in the 1630-40s. Timothy was the 3rd generation to live on his family’s farm. He had an older brother and 4 younger sisters.

On May 6, 1713 Timothy published his intention of marriage to Grace Child and they married on May 14th. Grace and Timothy lived on the Walker family farm. In Rehoboth, Timothy farmed and worked at the family sawmill and inherited both when his dad and his brother both died in 1812. The farm and sawmill are long gone but at 432 Massasoit Ave., East Providence, RI the house Timothy built is still there: The Walker House. Timothy was a widow in 1729 and married 2nd wife Rachel Beverly on January 15, 1730. Timothy wrote his will in November 1744 and died in 1745. The will is 32 pages, it includes his children’s names, an inventory and his signature. Timothy is buried at Newman Cemetery about 1 mile from the Walker House, his house.

The Walker House is on land Timothy’s dad Samuel Walker inherited from his dad Philip Walker. The Walker House stayed in the family until 1812 and was donated to Preserve Rhode Island in 1984. “At the time of its erection it was considered a marvel of architecture. North of the house were apple orchards and outbuildings, including a barn, shed, carriage house, and chicken house.”

Philip Walker House building began in 1724

Major updates were completed in 2008 by Preserve Rhode Island, ‘The Statewide Advocate for Rhode Island’s Historic Places’. Today Timothy Walker’s house is a study house, “for architectural history and historic preservation students, who can benefit from first-hand observations of architectural features”. The website has photos, a field study PDF and an orientation packet PDF, 10 pages of detail about the house, its history and the Walker family. Virtual visit: https://www.preserveri.org/walker-house

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Conrad Meinzer b. 1734

Conrad Meinzer 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Conrad was born in Baden, Germany on May 21, 1734 and baptized there the next day. In 1751 Conrad was 17 years old and sailed to Pennsylvania where he joined a German American community in Lancaster County. It’s likely that Conrad’s parents Johann and Catherine Weil Meinzer sailed on the same ship, possibly a brother too. After arriving in Pennsylvania, men 16 and older all made an oath to the King, like a pledge of allegiance. “ .. in hopes and expectation of finding a retreat and peaceable settlement therein, Do solemnly promise and engage, that we will be faithful and bear true allegiance to His present Majesty, King George The Second, and His successors, kings of Great Britain”.

Conrad married Elizabeth HIbshman in 1760. Her family also came from Germany. Conrad and Elizabeth had 7 children, who were baptized at the local Lutheran church. Pennsylvania tax records show Conrad’s taxes for 1772, 1773 and 1779. In 1772 he was taxed on 100 acres of woodland, 2 horses and 2 cows. In 1773, taxed on 130 acres of land, 2 horses, 3 cows, 5 sheep and in 1779, taxed on 200 acres, 3 horses, 8 cows.

In April 1777 Conrad is on Mathias Harter’s land deed. The deed list neighbors: Benjamin Bowman and Conrad Meinzer. The Meinzer, Harter and Bowman families would all move together to Stark County, Ohio where Conrad’s 2nd great granddaughter Fiana Druckenbrod married William Miller. Fianna and William moved to Waverly, Iowa

Conrad wrote a will and his estate was settled on August 10, 1781. The will isn’t in his writing, the image shows a handwritten copy made by a clerk. Conrad’s will named his wife and children and he left his best cow to his wife.

Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records at Ancestry

Summarized: In the name of God amen. I Conrad Meinzer being very sick but of good senses, thanks be to God. My wife Elizabeth shall have all the use and income of the lands till my eldest son John is at lawful age the same to my son in law Michael Oberle. From said income my wife shall educate my children. My sons shall be obedient to their mother but each of said sons shall be free of his mother when fourteen years of age provided he intends to learn a trade. I order that in four weeks after my death all my personal estate shall be sold except my bed, a wardrobe, the best cow which I bequeath to my wife. From the money arising my debts shall be paid and the residue shall be dispersed. All my lands shall be divided into six plots the share that I live on at present shall be appointed to my son John and the other six shares to Catharina, Anna, Maria, Verona, Frederick and Conrad until all of my heirs are made equal.

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Deborah Bell b. 1650

Deborah Bell 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Deborah Bell was born on November 29, 1650 in Boston. Her dad and mom were Thomas and Anna Bell who migrated from England separately, met then married in Boston around 1640. Thomas Bell was one of Boston’s public executioners. Deborah had 7 siblings: John, Joan, Tabitha, Thomas, Hopestill, Moremercy and Joseph.

1670 Stonington census

Deborah married James York on January 19, 1669, probably in Boston. They moved to New London, Connecticut where they were on the 1670 census with 42 other families. Deborah’s brother Thomas Bell and James’s dad James York Sr. were on the census too. They founded a church, The First Congregational Church of Stonington, James Noyes the first pastor is on that same 1670 census. The church is still there today, organized in 1674 it was rebuilt after a fire in 1829. On June 16, 1678 Goodwife York was admitted to the church.

In New London, Deborah and James had 7 children. Deborah was widow in 1676 at age 26. She married Henry Elliot and they had 5 more children. Deborah and Henry Elliot’s marriage is recorded in a diary of the time, “… It was in the 5 day of March 78-79 mrs bruster was buried the 12 day father avery was buried: Henry Eliot was here to be maried Curtice brought the wine,.”

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Prudence Heath b. 1597

Prudence Heath 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Prudence was born in Ware, Hertfordshire, England and baptized there on November 6, 1597. Her parents were William and Agnes Cheney Heath. The town of Ware is 30 miles north of London, it’s as old as the Roman Empire from 55 B.C. The Heath family’s church was St Mary’s Parish, still there today.

In 1622 Prudence married Edward Morris, he was also from Ware. They were married in London, on Friday, October 25 at St Mary Mounthaw a parish church “in Old Fish Street Hill”. This church was destroyed in The Great Fire, started in a London bakery on September 2, 1666 and spread fast through the city. Mayor, Sir Thomas Bloodworth ignored the fire or didn’t realize the seriousness and by the time he acted it was a firestorm that lasted 5 days, destroyed one third of London and left 100,000 without homes. “The social and economic problems created by the disaster were overwhelming”. Even though the church burned, and was never rebuilt, a register record with Prudence and Edward’s marriage of 1622 survives.

Marriage in London 1622

Prudence and Edward had 4 children, all born in Ware, all left for America. Prudence and Edward both died in their 30s, Edward in 1631, Prudence in 1632. Around this time Prudence’s bothers William and Issac left for America and Prudence’s kids did too. Daughter Elizabeth migrated in 1635, she was 11 and was a servant to George Giddings. Son Isaac migrated the same year, he was with the Ruggles family and age 9. Youngest son Edward Morris (7th great grandpa of Elizabeth Speedy) stayed in Ware until 1651 then left for America to join his family there.

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Joanna Lutten b. 1618

Joanna Lutten 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Joanna Lutten was born around 1618. There’s no information on her parents and arrival in America, she probably came from England in the 1630s when King Charles 1 had dissolved Parliament, imprisoned 9 members and was cracking down on “non-conformist preachers” and believers. English Protestants and Puritans, breaking from the Pope & Catholic Church, left for America.

In America Joanna married Isaac Willey around 1638 in Boston and their first son, Isaac Jr., was baptized at the First Church in Boston. The church was created on July 30, 1630 by John Winthrop of the Winthrop Fleet, “their first official act, even before drawing up a charter for the city, was to create by themselves, and sign, a Covenant for the First Church in Boston. In this document we find these words: [Wee] solemnly, and religiously Promise, and bind ourselves, to walke in all our ways in mutuall love, and respect each to other.”

In 1646 with John Winthrop, the Willey family were original settlers of New London, Connecticut. “1. John Winthrop, Esq., whose home-lot was undoubtedly selected by himself before all others. The next five were probably John Gager, Cary Latham, Samuel Lothrop, John Stebbins, and Isaac Willey, whose home steads lay northwest of Mr. Winthrop’s, on the upper part of what are now Willams Street and Main Street.” New London is on the south edge of Connecticut 20 miles north of Long Island,

History of New London, Connecticut, Joanna fined

Joanna and Isaac had 5 more children and stayed in New London. In 1667 Joanna was written up in the court records. Second on the list, she had failed to being herself and her children to church and was fined 5 shillings. “Minutes of cases, chiefly before the County Court … Goodwife Willey presented for not attending public worship and bringing her children thither; fined 5s”. Joanna’s death date isn’t known, it was before 1670 when widowed Isaac married again.

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Ephraim Child b. 1654

Ephraim Child 9th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Ephraim was born on February 27, 1654 in Roxbury to Benjamin and Mary Bowen Child. He was the first born of 12 children. Ephraim grew up in Roxbury and at age 21 he fought in King Philips War and died in a battle on September 4, 1675.

King Philips War has an incredible history that changes as perceptions change. Metacom, English name King Philip, was the sachem, chief of the Wampanoag tribe following his dad Massasoit who aided and was friendly with the Mayflower Pilgrims. Metacom aided and was friendly with the New England colonists, tensions rose as the colonist moved further on to Wampanoag lands. In January 1675 there was a murder, 3 Wampanoag men were found guilty and hanged, Metacom was rumored to have plotted the murder. Wampanoag and Indians from other tribes began raiding towns, New Englanders gathered into troops and the war began. On both sides 1 of 10 soldiers was killed. On both sides homes, commerce and stored food were destroyed; citizens killed.

Ephraim joined up with Captain Richard Beers. On Friday, September 3, 1675 Captain Beers with thirty-six men headed for Northfield, Massachusetts to rescue townspeople after an attack. They camped overnight and on the morning of September 4 crossed Sawmill Brook where Indians had set up an ambush and the “company was most exposed, was furiously attacked in front and flank, and all were thrown into great confusion, but soon rallied and fought bravely for their lives, but were forced back by superior numbers some three-quarters of a mile to a narrow ravine on the south of a hill now known as Beers s Hill. Here a stand was made, and here the little band fought about their leader, with the courage of desperation, till their ammunition was exhausted and the captain with nearly every man had fallen”.

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Grace Morris b. 1661

Grace Morris 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Grace was born on February 17, 1661 in Roxbury, Massachusetts to Edward and Grace Betts Morris who both came to America from England. Grace was a middle child with 7 siblings. She and her sister Elizabeth married brothers from the Child family. In Roxbury, Grace Morris married Benjamin Child on March 7, 1683 and Elizabeth Morris married Joshua Child on March 9, 1685. Both families had 12 children and stayed there in Roxbury.

Grace died in December of 1723, Benjamin in January of 1724. They are buried in a tiny cemetery that’s now part of Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. The cemetery is kind of hidden and has a few different names: Walter Street Berrying or Burying Ground, Peter’s Hill, Walters Street Cemetery.

Grace and Benjamin Child, Rose Lincoln /Harvard University Staff Photographer

From an article, Hidden Spaces, in The Harvard Gazette, “Under giant Hawthorn trees are the crude, chipping headstones etched with old New England names like Baker, Weld, and Child. One of the earliest markers is a double headstone for Grace and Benjamin Child, husband and wife. Nearby is the stone marking Benjamin’s brother, Joshua, whose wife Elizabeth is also buried in the area. (According to the 1961 edition of the Arboretum publication“Arnoldia,” Joshua and Benjamin were brothers, born a year apart and baptized the same day, and Elizabeth and Grace were sisters. Each couple had 12 children.)”

Inscriptions on Benjamin and Grace’s shared headstone
“Here Lyes Buried The Body of BENJAMIN CHILD Who Died the 24th Day of January 1724 In the 66th year of His Age.”
“Here Lyes the Body of GRACE CHILD The Wife of BENJAMIN CHILD Died Dec. ye 10th 1723 In the 63rd year of Her Age.”

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Mary Hopkins b. 1623

Mary Hopkins 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Mary was born in 1623 in England, the daughter of William and Mary Andrews Hopkins.

The Hopkins family were in America by June, 1640 and in Cupheag (now Stratford) Connecticut where Mary’s dad surveyed and divided up land. “Mr. Roger Ludlow, Mr. William Hopkins and Mr. Adam Blakeman shall survey and divyde and sett out the bounds betwixt the Plantations of Cupheag.” The Hopkins family later moved to Hartford, Connecticut. In Hartford, Mary’s dad died around 1643 and her mom married Richard Whitehead.

Mary -by her married name Lewis- was in her step dad’s will. She inherited money and lands in England that were probably in her mom’s family and provided rent income. “… due and owing unto my daughter in law Mary Lewes the sum of one hundred pounds … and the gift and delivery of several goods and chattels … unto the said Mary Lewes, and her heirs forever, my message or tenement, with the backside, orchard and garden and all edifices and buildings upon the same built and standing, lying in Knoll in the county of Warwick in the kingdom of England.”

Hartford 1640 land lots

Mary married William Lewis in 1644 and they had 10 children: 7 sons, 3 daughters. William Lewis was an only child so would have inherited his dad’s home in Hartford. CT. On the map the Lewis family is No. 25 at the top. They lived right by the meeting house, market and jail in the center of town and on the landing of the Big River, or Connecticut River. The oldest Lewis daughter Mary, leads to Obed Gaines and family who were in Bremer County, Iowa by 1855. Mary Hopkins Lewis died at age 46, William remarried and lived a few years longer. Mary’s burial place is unknown.

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Jane Partridge b. 1612

Jane Partridge 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Jane Partridge was born around 1612 in Olney, England, one of 2 children of John and Frances Partridge. Jane married Henry Gaines, also of Olney, England. By 1638 Jane, Henry and their 3 sons John, Daniel and Samuel, were in Salem, Massachusetts. The family moved to Lynn, Massachusetts where they lived on the Nahant Bay. In their times there was a small stream called Gaines Neck. Their home was near a salt marsh so they probably ‘fished’ for shrimp, mollusks, and hunted all kinds of game birds that no longer exist. Their south east view was Egg Rock a tiny island. Today Egg Rock is a bird sanctuary, it had a lighthouse for awhile.

Egg Rock, Nahant

Both Jane and Henry died fairly young, in their 30s. Jane’s will survives and shows an inventory of possessions and apprenticeships for each of her sons. John age 13 was apprenticed for seven years to Francis Dowse a shoemaker. Daniel age 11 was apprenticed for eight years to Luke Potter, a tailor in Concord. Samuel age 7 was apprenticed to Nathaniel Hanforth “who was to educate him”. Nathaniel Hanforth was also asked to oversee the money left to each of the boys and improve it if possible.

The inventory showed possessions of the family. A house and a parcel lot including upland, 8 acres of salt marsh. Several bushels of Indian corn, a featherbed, plows, blankets, clothing, one trunk, a straw hat, ten handkerchiefs, four pewter dishes, one kettle, a handsaw, a sword, a pitchfork, 3 spoons, an earthen ware pot, flax and hemp, 2 bibles, a parcel of books.

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Mehitable Child b. 1669

Mehitable Child 9th great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Mehitable was born on June 29, 1669 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Her parents, Benjamin Child and Mary Bowen, migrated to America and married in Boston. They had 11 children: 8 sons, 3 daughters. Mehitable and siblings grew up in Roxbury, today it’s a neighborhood of Boston.

Mehitable married Samuel Perrin who was born in 1671 near Roxbury. His parents came to America from England around the same time as the Child family. Mehitable and Samuel moved to Woodstock Connecticut where Mehitble’s uncle Henry Bowen lived. Mehitable’s younger bother John Child and his wife Abigail Morris went to Woodstock too. The Bowen, Child and Morris families are ancestors of Elizabeth Speedy, the Perrin family are in-laws. They all lived there in Woodstock. Woodstock lands changed acmes and boundaries, sometime New Roxbury, Massachusetts, sometimes Woodstock, Connecticut, all the same spot, today officially Woodstock, CT.

Woodstock homes and lands

On a map of the early days of Woodstock, Mehitable and Samuel are home no. 46, John Child and Abigail Morris are No. 35. with relatives all around. Their church was the First Congregational Church of Woodstock, still there today. Mehitable and Samuel are both buried next to the church, in Woodstock Hill Cemetery. This cemetery has 24 Perrin, 61 Child, 16 Morris and 57 Bowen burials recorded at Find a Grave. Samuel and Mehitable’s headstones are still standing and works of art, I think. Somewhere in a New England library is a dusty old book about the artist who carved these headstones.
Samuel’s headstone inscription: Here lyes Buried y Body of Mr SAMUEL PERIN Who Died March y 10th 1743 Aged 73 Years.
Mehitable’s headstone inscription: In Memory of Mrs Mehetable ye wife of Mr. Samuel perin died September ye 7d AD 1752. in ye 84th Year of her Age.

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