Marah Smith b. 1686, Isaac Tubbs b. 1675

Marah Smith and Isaac Tubbs 7th great grandparents.  Marah and Isaac’s family on RootsMagic tree.

Marah Smith and Isaac Tubbs married in 1709 about 30 years after their fathers and grandfathers were on opposite sides of a 1670 Colonial riot. Marah Smith’s 2 grandfathers Richard Smith and John Huntley rioted on the Lyme side. Isaac Tubbs’s father and grandfather rioted on the New London side.

In Colonial Connecticut a 2 mile strip of land was part of ongoing land disputes. In May 1668 Lyme was incorporated, New London, Connecticut was already a town, when the Court made a judgement on the land: that it would be ’ministry land’ for the town ministers, one side for Lyme, the other for New London. Men from New London protested and accused their leaders of not truly representing the people. The 1668 Court ruling held, until August of 1671. 30 men from New London set out to mow the ministry land, they were met by a group of men from Lyme planning to mow their minister’s land, and the riot started. The Lyme constable put New London men in prison, the New London constable put Lyme men in the town prison. After a while leaders met and “drinking a dram together with som(e) seeming friendship, every man departed to his home” and decided to let the Courts again make a decision about the continuing land dispute. March 1672 the Court charged and fined men for rioting. From New London: Samuel Tubbs (father of Isaac Tubbs) and Isaac Wiley (grandfather of Isaac Tubbs). From Lyme: John Huntley and Richard Smith (grandfathers of Marah Smith). The court fined each town, but the Court eventually forgot about the fines or paid the fines and the disagreement just sort of died out.

The public records of the Colony of Connecticut volume 2 page 558 at HathiTrust

Samuel Tubbs b. 1638

Samuel Tubbs 8th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

Samuel was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Beginning about 1650 when Samuel was 12, his parents William and Mercy Sprague Tubbs had some long lasting marriage issues, all written up in Records of the colony of New Plymouth, they finally divorced in 1668.

By 1664 Samuel was looking for a change and arrived in New London, Connecticut. “Early in 1664, court orders were published prohibiting the use of cardes and shufflebords and warning the inhabitants not to entertane strange young men. Transient residents, who were not grantees and householders, were the persons affected by this order, and it aroused them to the necessity of applying for permission to remain. The roll of applicants consisted of … Samuel Tubbs. Most of these were allowed to remain, and a general permit was added: All other sojourners not mentioned, carrying themselves well, are allowed to live in the towne, else lyable upon warning to begone.” Page 145 in History of New London, Connecticut by Manwaring at HathiTrust 

In 1664 Samuel married Mary Willey. Mary’s family was well established in New London. Samuel and his father in law were part of ongoing land disputes between New London and Lyme, CT, sometimes called a riot, “A good many hard words and some blows were exchanged between the parties”. Volume 2 page 557 in The public records of the Colony of Connecticut at HathiTrust. 

Samuel and his brother in law John Wiley fought in King Philips War 1675-76. For this they earned land. A list of soldiers engaged in King Philips War in the campaign through the Narragansett Country who received land from the Government for their services. -In 1696 the General Court of Connecticut granted to them a tract of land six miles square, comprising the present town of Voluntown-. The Narragansett historical register: a magazine, Volume 1 page 146, story begins page 144 The Connecticut Pensioners.