Elizabeth Crooks b. 1810

Elizabeth Crooks 3rd great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth was born in Pennsylvania on May 3 1810, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Jeffrey Crooks. Elizabeth’s mom died when she was 7 and her dad remarried. In 1830, Elizabeth married William Stewart, also of Pennsylvania. They lived in French Creek, PA 30 miles east of Lake Erie, on the western edge of Pennsylvania. Elizabeth’s dad died in 1849 and in his will he named each of his children, Elizabeth and her sisters each inherited $100.

On the 1850 census Elizabeth was still in French Creek, Pennsylvania on a farm, she and William Stewart had 6 kids, ages 2 to 17 years old. On the 1860 census Elizabeth and family have moved 500 miles west to Jefferson, Green County Wisconsin. On the 1870 US census Elizabeth had moved 200 miles further west to Shell Rock, Butler County, Iowa. Elizabeth was 60, her husband William 65. Their 2 younger children James 24 and Elizabeth 18 were in the home, James and William farmed. Elizabeth was a widow in 1874 and on the 1880 census was living with daughter Elizabeth who had married Manford Speedy and their family. They all lived near Allison, Iowa.

Elizabeth Crooks died September 26, 1887 and had an obituary in the local newspaper, “Shell Rock, Mrs. Elizabeth Stewart, mother of J.W. and William Stewart of this place, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. M.B. Speedy at Allison, Monday evening, September 26th, at the ripe old age of 77 years, 4 months, and 23 days. She was buried in the cemetery at this place on the following Wednesday”. She id buried at Riverside Cemetery in Shell Rock, Iowa.

Sources

Jacob Miller b. 1808

Jacob Miller 3rd great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Jacob was born in 1808 in Virginia. On April 18, 1833 in Jackson, Ohio he married Sarah Davis, also from Virginia. They had their first child in Ohio then moved to Elkhart Indiana and had 9 more kids. The 1840 and 1850 US censuses show Jacob and family farmed in Baugo Township, 50 miles east of Lake Michigan, near Elkhart and South Bend, Indiana The red rectangle on the Google map shows the location. The Mitchell family from New York were neighbors in 1850 and on August 7, 1850 Jacob and Sarah’s oldest daughter Mary married Moses Mitchell and they moved to Iowa.

Jacob Miller photo

Miller, Jacob d. 1854 newspaper snapshot

Jacob died in 1854 at age 46 and there’s a pretty good chance he was hit by a train after a night of drinking. The newspaper article (Peru (Indiana) Wabash Valley Olio 1854 Jan 13) shows detail. In 1845 the ‘Temperance’ lobby, movement was pretty well established and continued to grow until prohibition in 1920. When Jacob died, his widow, with 8 kids still at home, one of them just born in 1854, decided to move 400 miles west to Iowa, where her oldest daughter Mary Mitchell and family lived. That move set in motion the marriage of Sarah’s son James to Mary Ella Gaines then the birth of their son William, then William’s marriage and the birth of his son, Faber who married Gladys. Faber’s sister Florence kept family history notes with the names and births of her family including Jacob’s family. Jacob’s kids would set up homes in California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Washington, 3 stayed in Iowa, 3 are currently unknown.

Sources

  • 1850 US Census at FamilySearch
  • Public Ancestry photo “LanceL_Ferris originally shared this 24 Dec 2013”.
  • Newspaper Archive, Cedar Rapids Public Library, Peru (Indiana) Wabash Valley Olio 1854 Jan 13

Samuel Newcomb b. 1794

Samuel Newcomb 1st cousin 6 generations away or 6 times removed on RootsMagic tree. Samuel was also the adoptive dad of William Newcomb Gaines, great grandpa of Faber Miller.

Samuel was born January 8, 1794 in Bernardston, Massachusetts to William and Elizabeth Connable Newcomb. The Connable and Newcomb families were pioneers, long time residents of Berndardston. At age 18 Samuel fought in the War of 1812 and received a pension and 160 acres of land as payment. After the war he had a farm next to his brother Obadiah. Samuel married Jemima Hunting on Oct 13, 1822. Samuel and Jemima had a son William, who died before age one.

In 1826 Samuel adopted William N Gaines, son of Samuel’s cousin Leydia Connable Gaines. Samuel joined the Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), even though ‘he believed Brigham Young was an imposter’. In 1832 in Onondaga, NY Orson Pratt, an early LDS Church leader baptized Samuel and Jemima. Samuel, his wife and adopted son William moved to Kirtland, Ohio the early home of the Latter Day Saints and home of the first Mormon temple.

A sketch of Salt Lake city in 1860By 1850 Samuel and his family were in Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory. Samuel was a widow in 1851. He wrote his will in 1855 leaving all to “William Newcomb Gaines my adopted son”. Samuel lived to age 85, he died in Janesville, Iowa and was living with William and family in his later years. “He was treated kindly in his old age by Mr. and Mrs. Gaines, and he died at their home”. Samuel is buried in Oakland Cemetery near Janesville, Iowa with William Gaines and his family.

Sources

  • “History of Orson Pratt,” Deseret News, 9 June 1858, 65. John Tanner or the Bolton Branch mentioned in December 20, 1832 and February 2, 1833 entries shared on FamilySearch
  • Will in Iowa, Wills and Probate Records, 1758-1997 at Ancestry
  • Early members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Volume 4 page 592 image 594 of 920
  • At Wikipedia ‘Utah’ page, may be from Richard F. Burton’s City of the Saints, Public Domain
  • Bernardston Births, Marriages and Death image 40 of 233 handwritten, right page Samuel and Jemima 2nd on list. “Samuel Newcomb Gaines and Jemima Hunting both of this town October 13, 1822”

George Flood b. 1860

George Flood 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic

George was born March 8, 1860, the 3rd of 7 children, of William and Delia Angell Flood. He was born in Butler County, Iowa and grew up on a farm near Shell Rock, the former Lowtown area. In 1862 George’s dad William went off to the Civil War. William came back in 1865, farmed and was a blacksmith. George picked up blacksmith skills from his dad and on census records his occupation was blacksmithing.

In 1886 George married Lucy Lewis, they lived in Aurora, South Dakota. Their 2 kids Clyde and Edith were born there. George and family were back in Iowa in 1900 and on the US census that year George is a blacksmith, Lucy a housewife and both kids are in school. They live at 27 Locust Street in Allison, Iowa. Their neighbors are from Iowa, Connecticut, the Dakotas, England, Germany, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin; and are farmers, a furniture and hardwire merchant, laborer, lawyer, meat dealer, music teacher, peddler, printer’s apprentice, postmaster and servant. George and Lucy stayed in Allison, Butler County, Iowa. George’s sister Nettie lived with them family for several years. George was the administrator of his uncle Charles Angell’s estate along with Leander Angell, Charles’s son, George’s cousin.

George’s daughter Edith married Roy Rathbone, they lived in Sumner, Iowa. George, his sisters Nettie and Matilda Flood Mockford visited Edith and family in August, 1928 and brought George’s granddaughter Lucy Rathbone back to Allison for a week long visit. George’s son Clyde signed up for World War 1 in August, 1917. Clyde was in the 93rd Aero Squadron and returned home March, 1919, worked on a turkey farm and married Mayme. George lived with Clyde and Mayme in his later years after his wife Lucy’s death.

George died in 1936, his obituary from the Clarksville, Iowa newspaper May 28, 1936: “George Flood, a pioneer resident of the vicinity died at the home his son Clyde at Mason City last Wednesday afternoon, He had been in failing health for a long time. Funeral services were held at the Whitaker Funeral Home at Dumont Friday afternoon with members of the IOOF lodge of which Mr Flood was a member, taking part. Burial was in Lowell Cemetery beside his wife, Beside his son Clyde he is survived by a daughter Mrs Roy Rathbone of Sumner and three sister Mrs Matilda Mockford of Allison, Mrs Eunice Culver of Detroit Michigan and Mrs Tena Lotts of Sebastopol, Calif.”.

Sources

Henry Wolcott b. 1578

Henry Wolcott 12th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Henry was born in December 1578 in Lydeard St Lawrence, Somerset, England and baptized there on December 6 at Lydeard St. Lawrence Church. In 1606 he married Elizabeth Saunders in the same church. The Wolcott family left for America in 1630 on the The Mary and John. They lived in Dorchester, Massachusetts for a year or so, then moved to 100 miles west to Windsor, Connecticut.
In Dorchester Humphrey was an assessor, fenceviewer and selectman. He was a deputy of the Court, constable and tax collector in Windsor. Henry’s brother John was living in Lydeard in April 1636 and wrote a letter to Henry. John wrote Henry of their brother Christopher’s death, King Charles at war with Scotland, how times had changed and prayers for Henry’s safety in the new country.

Henry and his wife died within a couple months, “Mr Henry Wolcot dyed may 30th 1655. The wife if Henry Wolcot dyed July 5 1655”. They’re buried in Palisado Cemetery in Windsor, CT. They share a tombstone added years after their deaths, Henry’s inscription on one side, Elizabeth’s on the other.

Henry made his will o the day he died, “The thirtieth of May (1655), I HENRY WOLCOTT, sick of body, but of perfect memory, do make and ordain this my last will and testament, in manner and form following. First I commend my soul to God my maker, hoping assuredly through the only merit of Jesus Christ my Saviour, to be a partaker of life everlasting; and I commend my body to the earth, whereof it was made. I will that my wife shall have all my house lot, orchard, garden, hopyard and my lot in Plymouth meadow, during the term of her natural life. Also, I give unto my wife two of my cows, and half the household goods in my dwelling house”. Henry mentions each child and gifts them specific items.

Sources
Wolcott Genealogy: the family of Henry Wolcott, page 26 – 28 at HathiTrust. Illustration of tombstone about page 39.

The New England historical and genealogical register (NEHGR) 2009. Volume 163 page 282, several pages. NEHGR 1848 volume 2 page 373. At American Ancestors.

Births marriages and deaths returned from Hartford, Windsor and Fairfield page 43. At HathiTrust.

Find a Grave memorial https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7369754/henry-wolcott .

Nick Chipchase / Lydeard St. Lawrence church.

Humphrey Wise b. 1591

Humphrey Wise 10th great grandpa on RootsMagic

Humphrey Wise or Wythe was born in 1591 in England. His dad Benjamin died in 1601 and “with his mother Humphrey was an infant co-executor of the will of his father, he received land in Harkstead and Erwartoon”. On April 8, 1616 Humphrey married Susan Pakeman, they had 10 kids. Eight daughters and 2 sons. Humphrey lived in Suffolk County, near the River Orwell, on the eastern edge of England on the North Sea. Humphrey has records in Ewarton, Harkstead, Holbrook, Nacton and Woolvertsone, villages, all within 10 miles of each other in ipswich, England. Humphrey was a mariner, sailor.

The Wise family, parents and kids sailed to America in 1636. Humphrey and Susan were in their 40s. They settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts where Humphrey received a one acre “house lott and south side of Hartbreake Hill and a farm one hundred acres on the South side of a creek called the Labour in Vayne”. Heartbreak Hill has a legend involving a sailor and an Indian Maiden at Historic Ipswich.

Humphrey died in 1638, his burial place isn’t known. Humphrey didn’t leave a will, his widow remarried and her new husband Samuel Greenfield took control of the estate. the Court got involved.
In Boston January 13 1638/9. “Humfry Wise of Ipswich, died intestate, and Samuel Greenfeild late of Salem married his widow and took into his possession the lands and goods of the said Humfry, without legal order. The Court held at Ipswich 26 : 1 : 1639, caused them to deliver an inventory of the estate which amounted to about 140 pounds Wise left a wife and five children, Beniamyn, Joseph, Em., Sarah and Ann, besides some that were married and had received their portions. Samuel Greenfeild was appointed administrator, and with his consent the Court sold the house, and house lot of an acre & a planting lot of six acres with the appurtenances to William ffellowes for 20 pounds, also the farm of about 120 acres to Thomas Emerson for four score pounds, and such other sales of cattle & goods that the said Samuel had made the Court allowed. The money was given to Samuel Greenfeild, he giving bond for 120 pounds to bring up the five children, until the sons were twenty one years, and the daughters eighteen, at which time each to receive a certain portion of the estate”.

Sources
The probate records of Essex County Massachusetts. Volume 1 Page 11. At HathiTrust.

The American genealogist database. Volume 68 page 216. At American Ancestors

The ancient records of the town of Ipswich from 1634 to 1650. No page numbers, about image 36 Humphrey Wyth lands granted. At HathTrust.

Postcard Ipswich Beach via Historic Ipswich. org, Postcards from Ipswich 

James Hill b. 1726

James Hill 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

James was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts on April 26, 1726. He was the youngest of 8 kids of Samuel and Ann Brown Hill. James married Eunice Walker, “James and Eunice Walker, both of Rehoboth, married by Rev. John Greenwood May 11, 1749. Int. April 13, 1749” is recorded in Vital Record of Rehoboth. James was a farmer and a blacksmith. He was a widow in 1772 and fought in the American Revolution from 1775 to 1779.

James’s first battle was on April 19, 1775 that was the day Paul Revere and others rode through the countryside warning towns and soldiers that the British Army was on the move. A Sons of the American Revolution SAR application was completed and verified in 1930 and lists the details of James’s service. Horace Hills completed this SAR application in 1930, verified as correct because of James’s Hill(s) age and location. Horace Hills lived at the same time as Philippa Mockford Speedy, they were 5th cousins.

Hills, James 1802 will with signature

Signature on 1802 will

James Hills left a will with all his children listed including Cynthia Hill Angell 3rd great grandma of Elizabeth Speedy. In 1802, the year he died, “My daughter Cynthia wife of Asa Angell …all my estate both real and personal not herein before disposed … after paying my just debts … equally divided.” Some of James’s inventory: 1 black straight woolen coat, waistcoats and breeches, hat, mittens, caps and glove, bedstead, flannel sheets, tablecloths, linen sheet, 1 sword and belt, butter mold, ladle, candle stand, bible, silver drinking cup, iron teaspoons, teapot, crockery, chairs, tables, farming tools, blacksmith tools, livestock, dwelling house, corn barn, 10 acres of land.

Sources