Cynthia Hill b. 1763

Cynthia Hill 5th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Cynthia Hill was born August 18, 1763 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts to James and Eunice Walker Hill. Through her dad, Cynthia’s ancestors go back to Mayflower passengers John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. John and Elizabeth married then had 10 children who lived to adulthood (a rare thing in the 1600s) so today there are millions of Howland & Tilley descendants. If you are related to Philippa Flood Mockford Speedy you’re (99% sure) one of them.

Cynthia married Asa Angell around 1794 and they had seven kids, three sons and four daughters. They lived in New Berlin, New York, farm country in the center of NY state 30 miles west of Albany. They lived on a farm, Asa was also a cooper: he made wooden barrels, buckets and tubs. Their kids married, had families and stayed in New York except for Dexter who lived in Indiana, Rhode Island and then returned to NY. Cynthia died in 1830, Asa in 1842. Both are buried in Scribner Cemetery, New Berlin, New York. There are 40 other Angell memorials there at the Find a Grave cemetery site, including Asa’s siblings and sons.

My daughter Cynthia Angell wife of Asa

I’ve started an Iowa Society of Mayflower Descendants Official Membership application, a slow process. 2020 is the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower landing. Cynthia Hill is a proven Mayflower Descendant and her marriage to Asa Angell is proven. Asa’s dad Israel wrote a letter to Asa with a special note to grandson Dexter, whose will mentioned daughter Delia. After her dad Dexter’s death Delia went to Butler County, Iowa where her brother Charles lived. Delia married William Flood, their daughter Matilda Flood married Richard Mockford, their daughter Philippa Mockford married Harve Speedy, they’re the parents of Elizabeth Speedy. I have an informal proof written up here: https://eachlifeinplace.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/john-i-was-on-the-mayflower-howland-to-philippa-mockford-1.pdf

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Mary Bowen b. 1635

Mary Bowen 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Mary was born in Glamorgan, Wales in 1635, a middle child of Griffin and Margaret Fleming Bowen who had at least 12 children. Glamorgan is an historic county in Wales, at the southern most edge on the Bristol Channel. Mary and her siblings, parents all sailed for America in 1638. They were in Boston and on December 6, 1638 the Bowen family joined The First Church in Boston. They lived at Muddy River on the Charles River. “On the 25th of March 1639 Mr Gryffen Bowen had a great Lot granted to him at Muddy River”. By 1648 Mary’s mom and dad sailed back to Wales, or England to live. The kids all stayed America.

Mary married Benjamin Child in Massachusetts around 1652 and they went 4 miles south to Roxbury, Massachusetts. In Roxbury Mary and Benjamin joined the First Church of Roxbury. Churches also served a meeting houses, Benjamin was one who provided money to build the church and meeting house. Mary’s sisters, their husbands were also in Roxbury.

Mary and Benjamin had 12 children between the years 1654-1673. Mary’s husband and dad died around the same time about 1678, she is mentioned in both wills. In her dad’s will, “Widow Child had a share in the distribution of Griffith Bowen’s estate.“ Mary was administrated of her husband’s estate, she provided an inventory which included the lands, livestock, 3 silver spoons and a silver cup, a feather bed, bolsters & blankets, a rug, 10 lbs. of flax, a frying pan and an iron pot.

Mary died at age 72 on Halloween 1707, “The widow Mary Child dyed the last day of October at night”. Both she and Benjamin are buried in Eliot Burying Ground in Roxbury, their headstones are long gone.

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Stephen Green and Mary Hoad b. 1765

Stephen Green and Mary Hoad, 5th great grandparents on RootsMagic tree.

Stephen Green was born in Seaford, Sussex, England. He was christened on March 9, 1765 his parents were Hannah and Stephen Green. Stephen had 8 siblings. Mary Hoad was christened on March 31, 1774 in Seaford. Her parents were John and Elizabeth Finch Hoad. Mary had 9 siblings.

Mary and Stephen were married on January 19, 1795. “Stephen Green and Mary Hoad, No. 179 Stephen Green of this parish, widower, of the same parish spinster Married in this Church by Banns this 19th day of January in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety five by me Tho. Evans. This marriage was solemnized between us the mark of Stephen Green the mark of Mary Hoad. In the presence of the mark of Richard Hoad the mark of Mary. -And- 1795 Banns marriage between Stephen Green widower and Mary Hoad spinster of this parish were published on the three Sundays underwritten. That is to say 4th, 11th 18th of January 1795 by me Tho. Evans, Vicar.” Spinster is the same as maiden, unmarried.

Their parish was most likely St Leonards, now an episcopal church. Their town Seaford is on the southwest edge of England on the English Channel. There is a place there called Seven Sisters, 500 feet chalk cliffs along the coast. If a person were standing in the panoramic photo they’d be a speck.

Seven Sisters Panorama, East Sussex, England at Wikipedia

Stephen’s first wife was Ann Levant, they had 4 children. Stephen and Mary had 7 children. Elizabeth Green was the youngest daughter- 2nd great grandma of Elizabeth Speedy, she would leave for America in 1862 with her husband Richard Mockford – they lived in Monroe, New York, their grandkids would go west, Richard Mockford to Iowa where he married Matilda Flood, their daughter was Philippa Mockford Speedy, their granddaughter was Elizabeth Speedy.

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Samuel Jeffrey and Jane Hanna b. 1750

Samuel Jeffrey and Jane Hanna 5th great grandparents on RootsMagic Tree

Samuel Jeffrey was born in 1750, probably in Pennsylvania, maybe in Ireland or Scotland. HIs parents and past aren’t known. Wife Jane Hanna has even less information, just that she was in the area and about the same age. Samuel and Jane married around 1775 and had 9 kids.

The Jeffreys married near Maryland, then settled in Allegheny County in western Pennsylvania, about 15 miles west of Pittsburgh. In the area, near the towns of Clinton, Moon and Imperial, the Pittsburgh International Airport is there now.

Samuel was in the Revolutionary War with the Chester, Pennsylvania Militia, from 1781-1782. A Pennsylvania Veteran Burial Card shows this info. On December 8, 1786 Samuel and James Brice were on a land deed, they bought 3.4 acres.

Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 at Ancestry

The Jeffrey family is on the 1790 US census which is 9 pages with 5800 total households, heads listed by name, wife and spouse by tick marks. With Samuel and Jana are 3 daughters and 4 sons. On this same census are William Stewart, William Speedy, Henry Crooks, the Howlett and Hanna families- all ancestors of Elizabeth Speedy. Some members of these families traveled west together from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin and a few to Iowa.

In the digital book from 1889, History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, there’s a bio with details on Samuel Jeffrey, “R. W. Jeffrey (Robert Walker Jeffrey b. 1824), farmer, is a grandson of one of the early settlers of Fayette township. Samuel Jeffrey, who was born in Ireland, emigrated to America, locating first in Maryland, but later coming to Allegheny county, where he took up a tract of land from the government.” The ‘born in Ireland, emigrated to America’ part is a maybe, there’s no records to prove this yet.

Samuel died on August 26, 1798. Jane Hanna Jeffrey probably died about the same time. Samuel has a headstone at Montour Cemetery, Oakdale, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The current newer headstone was placed in 1970. Inscribed on the headstone: Samuel Jefferey Sr. Died August 26, 1798 Revolutionary War Veteran Pvt. H? Chester Co. Penna Militia Served Apr 23 1781 to Jan 1, 1782 The Oldest Marked Grave … Cemetery. Jane is probably buried in the same cemetery.

In the same Montour Cemetery other Jeffrey family are buried including Elizabeth Jeffrey Crooks whose daughter Elizabeth Crooks Stewart went all the way to Iowa where her daughter Elizabeth Stewart and husband Manford Speedy had a son Harve Speedy, dad of Elizabeth Speedy .

Sources

  • Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania, Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-2012 at Ancestry
  • History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania at HathiTrust
  • 1790 US Census at FamilySearch

Elizabeth Parrish b. 1691

Elizabeth Parrish: 8th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Elizabeth Parrish was born March 19, 1691 in Groton, Massachusetts.  Elizabeth was the 2nd of 10 children of John and Mary Waddell Parrish. Elizabeth’s dad John and mom Mary Waddle were both born in Massachusetts, their ancestors were from England and Scotland. Elizabeth had 9 bothers and sisters and 4 half siblings.

Sometime before 1704 Elizabeth and her family moved to Preston, Connecticut where the family was admitted to the First Congregational Church, “Nov 15, 1704 John PARISH & Mary, his wife, by letter from Ipswich”

Also in Preston, CT Elizabeth married Francis Tracy, grandson of Thomas Tracy, on January 6, 1714. The Tracy family of England were original settlers, founders of Preston. “Thomas Parke, Thomas Tracy, and others established Preston … Owaneco, son of the Mohegan sachem Uncas, gave a confirmatory deed for the land in 1687”.

The Parrish and Tracy families were interconnected. Benjamin Parrish married a Tracy sister, Elizabeth’s sisters Mary, Sarah and Lydia married a Tracy brother.
And in my family tree Elizabeth Parrish and Francis Tracy are 6th great grandparents on my mom’s family side.
Elizabeth’s sister Lydia P. and Francis’s brother Christopher T. are 6th great grandparents on my dad’s family side.
In Elizabeth and Lydia Parrish’s lives, from 1680s on, the chances not taken, choices made, relationships built, risks taken, all led to my descendants in Iowa connecting. I don’t think about it for too long- it makes my head spin.

Parrish to speedy

Elizabeth and Francis’s first Iowa ancestor was Delia Angell, age 15, she came to Iowa after her dad Dexter died and she lived with older brother Charles Angell . Delia would marry William Flood, the great grandparents of Elizabeth Speedy, my grandma.


Parrish to miller

Lydia and Christopher’s first Iowa ancestor was Leydia Connable Gaines, age 59. Leydia and husband Obed Gaines traveled by wagon from Indiana to Waverly, Iowa to live with son William Gaines and his wife Sarah Swain, the great grandparents of Faber Miller, my grandpa.

Sources

Speedys visit Devil’s Backbone State Park

Clarksville, Iowa newspaper July 24, 1930, “Mr. and Mrs. Harve Speedy and family and Miss Laura Wubbena spent Thursday at the Devil’s Backbone state park near Strawberry Point.”

Backbone State Park was dedicated in 1920, Iowa’s first state park. It’s named for the “steep and narrow ridge of bedrock cut by a loop of the Maquoketa River and forming the highest point in northeast Iowa – the Devils Backbone”.

Devil's Stairway at Backbone State Park

The 1920 dedication by Senator Byron Newberry: Everyone on the streets seems late for … a conference, meeting, luncheon. Hurry is stamped in the wrinkles of the American face. Parks let us look at things in leisure & give us a better view of life. Through parks we give health, build character, make use of leisure and build for future greatness. (Condensed)

Harve, Philippa and family would have driven about 2 hours, in a car, a 1920-30s model big enough for 2 parents, 6 kids and a friend. Philippa was 38 years old, Harve was 47. Children’s ages were Elizabeth age 13, Richard 11, Marjorie 9, Norma 7, Ivadell 5, Clair 3 years old.

In the same Clarksville, Iowa newspaper July 24, 1930, Harve’s brother Ernest Speedy’s family had a vacation in Clear Lake, Iowa. Philippa’s aunt and uncle Nettie and George Flood and family had visited George’s daughter Edith Flood Rathbone and her family at Sumner, Iowa.

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Clarissa Mockford b. 1847

Clarissa Mockford 4th great aunt on RootsMagic tree.
Clarissa was born in 1847 in Cornwall, England. In 1860 Clarissa received a graduation certificate, praising her work “very attentive and industrious”. This Victorian era certificate could have been from Sunday School or a public school. In most families -not landowning and not wealthy- kids older than 10 worked and didn’t go to school.

The certificate has these quotes running along the edge:

Honor all men, fear God, honor the King, love the brotherhood.
Love not sleep lest thou come to poverty.
Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy.
Open thine eyes and thou shalt be satisfied with bread.
Enter not in to the path of the wicked and go not in the way of evil men.  Better is little with the fear of the lord than great treasure and trouble therewith.
Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life.

Clarissa lived in Cornwall until she was 19 and in 1866 with her parents and younger siblings she sailed to America and joined older brothers Henry, great grandpa of Elizabeth Speedy, and William. Henry and William had been in America for about 10 years. In 1870 Clarissa was living in Monroe County, New York and was a dressmaker. Clarissa married James A. Edmonds, a carpenter, around 1872 and they had their first child Lena in 1874 and second child Lewis in 1877.  Clarissa and James stayed in Monroe County, NY and lived 10 miles South of Lake Ontario, 40 miles east of Niagara Falls. Lena, Clarissa and James’s daughter married William Spies at Niagara Falls on May 18, 1902. Son James Edmunds married Ada Patitillo in Los Angeles on May 24, 1918. At James’s death in 1954 their home was at 1847 S La Brea Ave about 10 miles west of the Pacific Ocean. Clarissa died in 1920, James in 1922. Both are buried at High Street Cemetery in Brockport,  Monroe County, New York.

Sources

  • England, Cornwall Parish Registers, 1538-2010 at FamilySearch
  • California, County Marriages, 1850-1952
  • Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927
  • California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-19941870
  • US census at FamilySearch
  • Certificate, Public Ancestry photo, ” JoAnna Messing originally shared this on 12 jul 2014”

Elizabeth Jeffrey b. 1779

Elizabeth Jeffrey 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Elizabeth was born in 1779 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. She was the oldest child of Samuel and Jane Hanna Jeffrey. A published family history states Elizabeth’s dad Samuel Jeffrey was from Ireland and came to America, first Maryland then Pennsylvania. There’s no proof for this, just a statement.

Around 1795 Elizabeth married Andrew Crooks from Pennsylvania. Elizabeth and Andrew had 7 kids. Four of the seven kids stayed in Pennsylvania. 2 moved to Ohio and 6th child Elizabeth Crooks married William Stewart in PA then went all the way west to Shell Rock, Iowa. Elizabeth Crooks Stewart was the great grandma of Elizabeth Speedy.

Elizabeth Jeffrey Crooks died in 1818 at age 36. She is buried at Montour Cemetery in Oakdale, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Her husband Andrew remarried, died 30 years later and is buried in the same cemetery.

Sources

Clyde Flood b. 1888

Clyde Flood 1st cousin 3x removed on RootsMagic tree

Clyde William Flood was born in South Dakota on March 6, 1888 to George and Lucy Lewis Flood. He had a younger sister Edith, also born in South Dakota, they returned to Butler County, Iowa when the kids were young. In Butler County Clyde and Edith grew up with their cousins Elmer Angell and Philippa Flood Mockford.

Clyde, Edith and Philippa’s grandma Delia Angell Flood was the sister of Elmer’s dad Charles Angell. The Flood and Angell families would have gotten together for picnics and holidays. Clyde and Elmer Angel were close in age, so were Philippa Mockford and Edith Flood.

Snapshots of Clyde and cousins

Clyde grew up on a farm so he would have helped his mom and dad with chores, planting, crops, livestock. At the 1905 Butler County Fair, Clyde won premiums for flowers he raised including a first place for Dahlias. Clyde and Elmer Angell both fought in World War 1. Clyde enlisted in 1917 and served 17 months in the Iowa 95th Aero Squadron, promoted to Corporal . “The squadron was initially formed in early August 1917 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, where 150 civilians were sworn into the United States Army as soldiers. The newly-sworn in men were sent to Kelly Field, Texas, where they arrived on 19 August and were organized as the 95th Aero Squadron.” Elmer died in the Meuse–Argonne battle, in France, 1918.

Flood, Clyde WW1Clyde came home in May, 1919 via the May 7 Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper. “Chas. Thomsen and Clyde Flood arrived here Sunday morning having received their discharge from the army after service over seas.” Though 1920-21 Clyde was active in getting a Butler County post for the American Legion. December 15, 1921 he was elected Sergeant at Arms. September 25, 1924 via the Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper, “Iving and Milo Isaacson, Clyde Flood and Dave Kramer drove to St Paul the first of the week where they represented the Allison Post of the American Legion at the National Convention. They returned last week and report having a find trip and a mighty good time at the convention”.

He liked cars too. In November 1934 Clyde bought a brand new Chevrolet Coach. April on 1936 he got a new Chevrolet Carry All Suburban.

Flood, Clyde with a trukeyClyde found work at a turkey farm after he returned from the war. Mr. Nicholas, the farm owner, had a broken electric fan. Nichols was ready to throw it away- Clyde was looking for work, asked to look at the fan ‘from an old battery he got enough material to start’ then fix the fan. Clyde stayed at the turkey farm for 20+ years. In 1944 the Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette had a story about the Nicholas farm and all the birds being shipped overseas for the the World War 2 soldiers Thanksgiving Dinner. Clyde is featured in the story, he was 56 in 1944.

Clyde married Mary ‘Mayme’ Noonan June 27, 1941 in Mason City. They married later in life and didn’t have kids and lived at 420 South Fillmore Avenue there’s a Walgreen’s there now. Clyde died January 25, 1950 at The Des Moines Veteran’s Hospital. Mayme died in 1971. Both are buried Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City, Iowa.

Sources

Jane Howlett b. 1753

Jane Howlett 5th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Jane, from Maryland, was born in 1753, the oldest child of Andrew and Margaret Howlett. Jane and her siblings grew up near Baltimore. Andrew Howlett owned lands: Howlett’s Ambition and Howlett’s Triangle, the two lots totaled 75 acres.

Baltimore, Maryland

About 1770 Jane married Henry Crooks. In 1776 she was 23 years old. On the Maryland census, Jane and family lived on a farm which Jane would have taken care of, when Henry went off to the Revolutionary War. After the war, Henry earned land from his military service. In 1786 on the Pennsylvania, Septennial Census, Jane and Henry, their family lived in Washington County, in western Pennsylvania, about 5 miles east of the Ohio River. Jane and Henry had 7 kids, 4 sons and 3 daughters.

Jane died in 1816, Henry lived another 15 more years. They are both buried at Raccoon Church Cemetery in Candor, Pennsylvania, USA. They share a headstone, carved with on the front and on each their initial J. C. and H. C. on the back. Henry Crooks was in the Revolutionary War so has a

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