Joan Hurst b. 1568

Joan Hurst 11th great grandma on RootsMagic tree.

Joan Hurst was baptized March 13, 1568 at St Mary’s Parish in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England. Her first husband was Thomas Rogers who died around 1595. Her 2nd husband was John Tilley. They married September 20,1596 in the same St Mary’s Parish. They had 5 children, Elizabeth Tilley was the youngest she was baptize in the same church as her mom. In 1620 Joan 52, John 48 and Elizabeth 13 were on the Mayflower and in America by November. Joan’s husband John was in the exploring party on December 6 noted for the first contact with American Indians. By January 1621 the exploring parties found a location to set up their colony, an abandoned Wampanoag village. The men built shelters, with each man responsible for his own family, ‘by that course men would make more haste than working in common’. In February this group had homes, food and water sources and supplies unpacked form the Mayflower.

Tilley, John 1620 Mayflower exploring party

1620 Mayflower exploring party

By March the number of passengers and crew, was down to 47. From Bradford’s History. “Of these hundred persons which came first over in this first ship together, the greater half died in the general mortality, and most of them in two or three months’ time.”

Joan Hurst, her husband John Tilley, John’s brother Edward Tilley and Ann, his wife, they died the first winter and were buried in Coles Hill Burial Ground. Joan and John’s daughter Elizabeth was left an orphan and eventually married another passenger John Howland. Elizabeth and John had 10 kids who all survived so today this couple has 2 million Mayflower descendants. I’m working on getting this Mayflower connection officially verified, the 400th anniversary is coming up November 2020.

Sources

Benedict Arnold b. 1615

Benedict Arnold 11th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

This Benedict Arnold was born in 1615 in Ilchester, England and was 19 when he sailed with his family to Massachusetts Bay. (This is Benedict Arnold No. 1, his 2nd great grandson was Benedict No. 5 of the American then British army). By 1636 the Arnolds were in Providence. In 1640 Benedict married Damaris Westcott, her family probably sailed to America on the same ship with the Arnold family. Benedict was President then Governor of Rhode Island for 11 years and with Roger Williams a trusted interpreter of the American Indian language. While looking for information on Christiana Peake Arnold, Benedict’s mom, I found a book, ‘The burying place of Governor Arnold’ by Alice Brayton about the establishment, destruction and restoration of the Governor’s burial grounds. Images are from this book. It’s in the public domain, an ebook at HathiTrust.

Alice Brayton of Newport, “In the spring of 1946 as I was walking down Pelham Street in Newport, Rhode Island, I saw a dozen people and a red flag in front of a dilapidated late nineteenth century cottage. It was an auction. The house was for sale. “How about the land behind the house Is it included?” “Yes, the house and the land behind the house.” “But the land behind the house, they tell me, is the burying place of Governor Arnold and his family. You can’t auction off a burying ground. It isn’t decent.” (It isn’t even legal in Rhode Island, as I found out later.) However, I bid in the house and the land behind the house. In this casual fashion I acquired Governor Arnold’s graveyard”.

Benedict Arnold wrote in 1675, “I order that my kindred relations may as they die be buried at convenient distance about my grave.” For a time Arnold and his family were buried in this cemetery then it was kind of forgotten. In 1901 a report was presented on the condition of the site, with nothing done and when Alice Brayton came along in the 1940s the site was “desolation and tin cans”.

Arnold, Benedict Newport home

Newport the seat of the Honorable Benedict Arnold

The book has b&w photos from the 1940s and stories of the family. Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries has full color photos. Originally Benedict and Damaris’s headstones had large plaques or stones, those are long gone. Photo of the cemetery today at Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries.


Brayton, Alice. The Burying Place of Governor Arnold, Newport, R.I.: Privately printed, 1960.

Page 19 Rhode Island. Commissioner to inquire into the condition of the Benedict Arnold burial place, and James N. (James Newell) Arnold.Report of J. N. Arnold, Commissioner to Inquire Into the Present Condition of the Governor Benedict Arnold Burial Place, And the Title Thereto. Providence: E. L. Freeman & Sons, 1901

John Smith b. 1598

John Smith 11th great grandfather on RootsMagic Tree

John Smith was born in England, around 1598. In England he married Alice her last name unknown. John was in Dorchester, Massachusetts by 1634 and by 1635 he was ordered to leave because ‘dyvers dangerous opinions’. At about the same time in Salem, Massachusetts Roger Williams had the same contrary views that didn’t align with the people in power. Roger had to return to England and maybe have a trial or meeting with superiors.

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The story is Roger escaped in the night in a canoe and with 4 others they made their way to a spot, connected peacefully with the native people and founded Providence, Rhode Island. The seal of Providence shows this event. In 1636 John and the others had built their homes and begun organizing. John was a miller and given a land to build a mill. He operated the mill agreeing that every 2nd and 5th day of the week the mill was reserved to grind corn for the town. John was a town clerk in 1641 so his name is on deeds and wills and laws passed. He probably died in 1648 and his will (not yet found) leaves the mill to his son and widow. The town council OKed this as long as Alice and John Jr provided good service, as John Sr. had, they did.

The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence volume 1 page 144

Seal of the city of Providence Rhode Island at Wikipedia 

Records of the Governor and company of the Massachusetts Bay Volume 1 page 159 John Smith banished 2 Sep 1635

Roger Williams 1638 land deed

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Rhode Island Roots volume 5 page 1 a snapshot of the referenced deed

In 1636 Boston courts decided  Roger Williams had to return to England. He was creating problems in the colony, accused of having diverse thoughts. Roger encouraged freedom of religion, ‘soul liberty’, a separation of church and state. He would ask the courts and churches to explain how stealing lands from the native Americans fit in with the beliefs of the new colony. As the colony prepared to export him, Roger Williams fled in the night. He headed down river to present day Providence, Rhode Island. With help from the Narragansett tribe he founded a colony based on his beliefs. March 24, 1638 the first land deeds were signed by the native people selling the lands and witnessed by Roger Williams and Benedict Arnold (Gov’r not American Revolution soldier).

Years later Roger’s son Daniel said, “Can you find such another now alive or in this age? He gave away his lands.” It is pretty amazing for those times and anytime: Roger owned all that land, legally and he thought, ethically purchased, but he didn’t keep the lands he shared them. He wanted the new Providence Plantation to succeed so he started deeding land to his friends and followers and they all started working on building a place built on Roger’s ideas.

Rhode Island Roots. Warwick, RI: Rhode Island Genealogical Society, 1975–. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2018.)

 

Thomas Judd b. 1608

Thomas Judd 10th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

judd, thomas landThomas Judd was born in England, about 1608. He landed in Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay in 1634. In Cambridge he was admitted to the church and made a freeman in May of 1636. Thomas left Cambridge for Connecticut, first Hartford, probably with Puritan minister Thomas Hooker. Both Hooker and Thomas Judd are landowners on a map of Hartford in the 1640s, these would be original settlers. The map was “prepared from the original records by vote of the town” and created in the 1800s. Thomas Judd is in the bottom left corner No. 154. Other Miller family landowners on this map in this same area in 1640 are Jeremy Adams, Thomas Bliss and Richard Risley.

UCONN libraries provides a digital copy of this map and details.
A list of the landowners ‘freeholders’ here
More details on the map here.

Thomas left Hartford for Farmington where he held lots of town service positions including, in August of 1658 “to communicate the mind of the court to the Indians”. Church records of Farmington, Connecticut name Thomas as the second Deacon of the church. “The number of such as are in full communion in the church in Farmington March 1 1679/80. Deacon Judd. Benjamin Judd and his wife. John Judd and his wife. William Judd and his wife”. Finally Thomas moved to Northampton, Massachusetts where he is buried and has a headstone credited to a descendant: Sylvester Judd of 1858.

He didn’t leave a will at his death but there is a probate record, 15 pages, handwritten mostly land deeds and an inventory.

judd, thaoms estate This page from the will lists the children and what they receive, Benjamin Judd 4th on the list is the Miller ancestor through Mary Ella Gaines, grandma of Faber Miller who married Gladys Cable.

Sources:
Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999 at Ancestry . com

Find a grave https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/28130545

Church Records of Farmington in Connecticut The New England historical and genealogical register, 1874 Volume 28 at Archive.org 

Thomas Bulkeley b. 1617

Thomas Bulkeley 18 and his family left England in 1634 or 35: “No doubt the long drawn out enrollments and the lack of effort to standardize spelling of the name were reflections of the family’s attempt to board the ship without being apprehended” from The Great Migration Vol 1 page 464. Thomas’s father Peter, a Puritan minister  had issues with the Church of England and Archbishop Laud, one of many, who left for New England. The Bulkeleys settled in Concord, Massachusetts and were part of a solid Puritan community.

In 1637 there were breaks in the Puritan community, Anne Hutchinson was part of it. Rev. Peter Bulkeley called her the devil. The breakdown was the Antinomian Controversy.  At an Ecclesiastical Council Reverend Bulkeley,  Reverend John Jones, John Cotton and others agreed to carry on and compromise.

In 1640 Thomas married Sarah Jones, the daughter of the Reverend John Jones. Rev. Buckeley and Rev. Jones were friends, the families were happy with the marriage.

In 1644 Reverend John Jones had to leave Concord he couldn’t abide by the religious beliefs. He left for Fairfield, Connecticut, many families left with Reverend Jones. Reverend Bulkeley in Concord was left with about 30 followers. Thomas and Sarah had to choose a side, his dad’s or her dad’s they chose her dad Reverend Jones’s side and moved to Fairfield.

Antinomian Controversy was huge in early America. My very basic understanding with no offense or expertise intended, it was the Covenant of Works -do this and you are saved- VS the Covenant of Grace -Christ did this so all are saved-. The whole story is at Wikipedia with 139 source citations.

Thomas Bulkeley (1617 – 1658)
Sarah Bulkeley (1640 – 1723)
Rebecca Brown (1684 – 1768)
Mary English (1715 – 1791)
John Connable (1749 – 1813)
Obed Gaines (1793 – 1877)
William Newcomb Gaines (1825 – 1907)
Mary Ella Gaines (1855 – 1917)
William Earl Miller (1879 – 1949)
Faber W Miller (1905 – 1957)

Elizabeth Tilley b. 1607

Jabez Howland house

Postcard. The Howland House, 1666, Plymouth, Mass.

I’ve added Mayflower passengers to my family tree. Elizabeth Tilley 10th great grandmother, at age 13 sailed on the Mayflower with parents John and Elizabeth Joan Hurst Tilley. The older Tilley children stayed in England. Both John and Joan died in the general sickness of the first winter, 1621. Orphaned Elizabeth was taken in by John Carver (Plymouth Colony governor). Carver had a man-servant or secretary John Howland. When both John Carver and his wife died in early spring of 1621, John Howland inherited their estate and Elizabeth Tilley became his ward, they soon married and had 10 children who all survived into adulthood, so today Tilley and Howland have millions of descendants -you could be one too.

Rocky Nook was John and Elizabeth’s home, it’s no longer around but the land is preserved with a monument and trees, a stone wall and cellars original to the Howland home. The Pilgrim John Howland Society and the Plymouth Archaeological Rediscovery Project share their findings which reveal much history: the Howland House Bake Oven and a 50 page report on 2015 excavations including an artifact catalog are 2 examples. More than 4750 artifacts have been uncovered on the lands.

John and Elizabeth’s son Jabez lived in a home at 33 Sandwich Street in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The home still stands today . John and Elizabeth lived with Jabez after their home burned. So a person could today walk through this Jabez Howland home in the footsteps of Mayflower passengers John and Elizabeth Tilley Howland. Fascinating.

The Jabez Howland House is the only existing house in Plymouth where Pilgrims actually lived. The original 17th century two-story timber framed house consisted of the porch, hall and hall chamber. John Howland and his wife, Elizabeth Tilley Howland spent their winters here with their son Jabez and his family.