Edward Bulkeley b. 1614

Edward Bulkeley 8th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Edward was born June 17, 1614 in Odell, England to Peter and Jane Allen Bulkeley, the oldest child of 9. Edward’s dad Peter was a Puritan pastor in Odell and was harassed by Archbishop Laud, so looking to leave England. The Buckeleys sailed to America in 1634 or 1635, secretly, “No doubt the long drawn out enrollments and lack of effort to standardize spelling of the names were reflections of the family’s attempt to board the ship without being apprehended. Son Edward preceded the rest of the family, becoming a member of Boston church on 22 March 1634/5”. Archbishop Laud’s story didn’t end well, He was sent to the Tower of London, then executed in 1645. King Charles would regret putting ’too much trust in Laud’.

Bulkeley, Edward house 1967Once they were in America the Bulkeleys lived in Concord where Edward was a freeman on May 6 1635. He married Lucien, last name unknown, in 1640 and they had 6 children. Around 1660 Edward built a house in Concord, on Main Street. “А deed referring to the property, with a dwelling on it, records the 1663 transfer of 10 acres of land located on today’s Main Street to Edward Bulkeley by his mother, widow of one of Concord’s founders and its first minister, Peter Bulkeley.” Today this home is at 92 Sudbury Road in Concord, a private residence, the house was moved in the 1800s. Edward died in 1696, his wife Lucien died in 1690. They are both probably buried at Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, no headstones remain.

Edward, like his dad, was a Puritan pastor and was known for his ‘fiery’ sermons. When his dad died, Edward followed as pastor of the First Parish Church in Concord. This church is also still there in Concord, Massachusetts, now a Unitarian Universalist church. Each Sunday the congregation ends their service with this benediction:

Go out into the world in peace

Have courage

Hold on to what is good

Return to no person evil for evil

Strengthen the fainthearted

Support the weak

Help the suffering

Honor all beings

Sources

Tena Henrichs b. 1880

Tena Henrichs 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Tena or Trientje was born October 1, 1880 in Germany. At 5 years old she and her family sailed from Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, from Baltimore they traveled to Butler County, Iowa. Tena grew up in Butler County, the 2nd youngest of 5 daughters and 4 sons of Hinrich and Maria Rodenbeck Henrichs.

On February 20, 1907 Tena married John Jacobs. John also migrated from Germany with his parents and 8 siblings. Tena’s brother Fred and sister Mattie were witnesses to the marriage and included on the marriage record. Tena and John lived in Jefferson Township, Butler County Iowa, in a community of German immigrants, farmers, Lutherans. Tena and John had a daughter who died very young and 3 sons: Henry, Jacob and John. Tena’s husband John died December 16, 1916, in an automobile accident. There are no records on how or where Tena and her three young sons lived, whether they stayed on their farm or moved in with relatives.

Soldiers of the 34th Infantry DivisionMeanwhile John Jacobs’s younger bother William had enlisted in the army for World War 1. He was a private in the Minnesota 34th Engineers, with men from Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska. They trained at Camp Cody, New Mexico and were in the war until the 1920s. Marvin Cone, Iowa artist and friend of Grant Wood was in this same unit and designed the insignia. William returned from World War 1 in 1920 and Tena and William married at Ebenezer Lutheran Church on February 22, 1920.

Each of Tena’s 3 sons married, had children and farmed in the Butler County area. Oldest son Henry married Alma Constein at Vilmar Church on February 18, 1936. Tena died May 9, 1959. She was 79 years old and is buried at Butler Center Cemetery with the Jacobs and Henrichs families.

Sources

Kathlyn, Lora, Raymond Perry b. 1920s

Lora, Kathlyn and Raymond Perry 2nd cousins 1x removed.

1940 Des Moines, Iowa

Gladys’s mom Mary Fries and the Perry kids’s grandma Lora Fries were sisters. Lora married John Jackson they had a daughter Pearl Irene Jackson. Pearl married Roy Perry and they had 2 daughters Lora and Kathlyn and a son Raymond. Gladys Cable was the aunt of the Perry kids and just a couple years older. They all grew up together in Pleasant Grove near Greene, Iowa. By 1940 the Perry family was in Des Moines where Roy was the manager and Pearl a cone maker at Krispy Homemade Kones owned by Ewing Lambert, brother to Gladys Cable, cousin to Pearl, uncle to the Perry kids. IN 1940 Kathryn and Lora were students at the American Schools of Business, Raymond was 17 and still in high school.

In 1941 all 3 enlisted in the Army. Raymond enlisted  December 30, 1941 and stayed in the Army until at least 1958 when he was Captain of the Transportation Corps, probably in Oregon. He died in 2013.

Perry, Lora and Kathlyn 1942 WAC graduating class

Kathlyn and Lora enlisted too, in the new Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps WAAC, later WAC. Lora enlisted August 24,1942 and Kathlyn enlisted September 9, 1942. Fort Des Moines, Iowa was the first WAAC training camp, it opened in July 1942. WAAC soldiers were pioneers, the program was phased out in the 1970s when soldiers were soldiers no matter the gender. Lora was probably in that first graduating class, Kathryn in a following class.

Lora and Kathlyn’s military service is harder to trace. Lora was probably still in the Army until as late as August 1956 when she was on a crew list flying from NY to Frankfort Germany. There’s no further detail on Kathryn’s service, yet. Lora married Donnally Langston, they lived in California. Kathlyn married Howard Manley and also lived in California. Lora died in 2004, Kathlyn in 2000. Both are buried in Sierra Hills Memorial Park Sacramento, California.

Sources

Samuel Newcomb b. 1794

Samuel Newcomb 1st cousin 6 generations away or 6 times removed on RootsMagic tree. Samuel was also the adoptive dad of William Newcomb Gaines, great grandpa of Faber Miller.

Samuel was born January 8, 1794 in Bernardston, Massachusetts to William and Elizabeth Connable Newcomb. The Connable and Newcomb families were pioneers, long time residents of Berndardston. At age 18 Samuel fought in the War of 1812 and received a pension and 160 acres of land as payment. After the war he had a farm next to his brother Obadiah. Samuel married Jemima Hunting on Oct 13, 1822. Samuel and Jemima had a son William, who died before age one.

In 1826 Samuel adopted William N Gaines, son of Samuel’s cousin Leydia Connable Gaines. Samuel joined the Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), even though ‘he believed Brigham Young was an imposter’. In 1832 in Onondaga, NY Orson Pratt, an early LDS Church leader baptized Samuel and Jemima. Samuel, his wife and adopted son William moved to Kirtland, Ohio the early home of the Latter Day Saints and home of the first Mormon temple.

A sketch of Salt Lake city in 1860By 1850 Samuel and his family were in Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory. Samuel was a widow in 1851. He wrote his will in 1855 leaving all to “William Newcomb Gaines my adopted son”. Samuel lived to age 85, he died in Janesville, Iowa and was living with William and family in his later years. “He was treated kindly in his old age by Mr. and Mrs. Gaines, and he died at their home”. Samuel is buried in Oakland Cemetery near Janesville, Iowa with William Gaines and his family.

Sources

  • “History of Orson Pratt,” Deseret News, 9 June 1858, 65. John Tanner or the Bolton Branch mentioned in December 20, 1832 and February 2, 1833 entries shared on FamilySearch
  • Will in Iowa, Wills and Probate Records, 1758-1997 at Ancestry
  • Early members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Volume 4 page 592 image 594 of 920
  • At Wikipedia ‘Utah’ page, may be from Richard F. Burton’s City of the Saints, Public Domain
  • Bernardston Births, Marriages and Death image 40 of 233 handwritten, right page Samuel and Jemima 2nd on list. “Samuel Newcomb Gaines and Jemima Hunting both of this town October 13, 1822”

George Flood b. 1860

George Flood 3rd great uncle on RootsMagic

George was born March 8, 1860, the 3rd of 7 children, of William and Delia Angell Flood. He was born in Butler County, Iowa and grew up on a farm near Shell Rock, the former Lowtown area. In 1862 George’s dad William went off to the Civil War. William came back in 1865, farmed and was a blacksmith. George picked up blacksmith skills from his dad and on census records his occupation was blacksmithing.

In 1886 George married Lucy Lewis, they lived in Aurora, South Dakota. Their 2 kids Clyde and Edith were born there. George and family were back in Iowa in 1900 and on the US census that year George is a blacksmith, Lucy a housewife and both kids are in school. They live at 27 Locust Street in Allison, Iowa. Their neighbors are from Iowa, Connecticut, the Dakotas, England, Germany, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin; and are farmers, a furniture and hardwire merchant, laborer, lawyer, meat dealer, music teacher, peddler, printer’s apprentice, postmaster and servant. George and Lucy stayed in Allison, Butler County, Iowa. George’s sister Nettie lived with them family for several years. George was the administrator of his uncle Charles Angell’s estate along with Leander Angell, Charles’s son, George’s cousin.

George’s daughter Edith married Roy Rathbone, they lived in Sumner, Iowa. George, his sisters Nettie and Matilda Flood Mockford visited Edith and family in August, 1928 and brought George’s granddaughter Lucy Rathbone back to Allison for a week long visit. George’s son Clyde signed up for World War 1 in August, 1917. Clyde was in the 93rd Aero Squadron and returned home March, 1919, worked on a turkey farm and married Mayme. George lived with Clyde and Mayme in his later years after his wife Lucy’s death.

George died in 1936, his obituary from the Clarksville, Iowa newspaper May 28, 1936: “George Flood, a pioneer resident of the vicinity died at the home his son Clyde at Mason City last Wednesday afternoon, He had been in failing health for a long time. Funeral services were held at the Whitaker Funeral Home at Dumont Friday afternoon with members of the IOOF lodge of which Mr Flood was a member, taking part. Burial was in Lowell Cemetery beside his wife, Beside his son Clyde he is survived by a daughter Mrs Roy Rathbone of Sumner and three sister Mrs Matilda Mockford of Allison, Mrs Eunice Culver of Detroit Michigan and Mrs Tena Lotts of Sebastopol, Calif.”.

Sources

Napoleon Fries b. 1856

Napoleon Fries 2nd great uncle on RootsMagic tree.

Napoleon Fries was born in 1856, in Kentucky to Charles and Emma Fries. HIs middle initial is B, middle name could have been Bonaparte. Napoleon had a sister Josephine and brother William. Their mom Emma died around 1870, when Napoleon was 14. His dad Charles married Mary, a widow with 2 kids. Charles and Mary had 5 kids together so Napoleon had 9 sisters and brothers.

Around 1875, Napoleon married Etta, they had 3 daughters and a son: Minnie, George, Josie and Emily. They lived in Kentucky and Illinois until 1891 when Napoleon was in a Denver, Colorado city directory. City directories gave a person’s address – no phones or phone numbers then- and sometimes their job. When Napoleon first moved to Denver he was a car cleaner. Then, a conductor, a brick layer, a motorman and a guard at the county jail for several years.

Fries, Napoleon worked at Denver County Jail

Denver County Jail

Napoleon’s first address was 55 S 11th, he lived there for a couple years then by 1920 moved to 549 Kalamath where he and his family lived for 20 years. At the S 11th address then and today there are businesses on the street level and apartments above. At the 549 Kalamath address today is a huge storage unit business, across the street are a few remaining cute family homes from the 1920s.

The 1930 census shows Napoleon owned this home, valued at $3800. In the home were Napoleon, his wife Etta and their daughter Josie with her husband James, a railroad worker. On the 1940 census Napoleon is in the same home- his wife, daughter and son in law had died. Napoleon died in 1942. He, his wife, daughter and son in law share a headstone at Crown Hill Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Jefferson, Colorado. A cemetery record shows Napoleon as a Woodman of the World, his son in law James was a Mason.

Sources
Colorado, Jefferson County, Wheat Ridge, Crown Hill Cemetery Records, 1900-1950 at FamilySearch.
US Censuses at FamilySearch.
U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 at Ancestry.
Denver Public Library digital collections the county jail
Denver Police Department throwback Thursday, The Old County Jail at Facebook

Annette Speedy b. 1868

Annette Speedy 2nd aunt on RootsMagic tree

Annette Constance Speedy was born in 1868 in Shell Rock, Iowa, the 4th child of Manford and first wife Ann Coates Speedy. Ann with Annettes oldest 2 siblings had died by 1869, so Annette, age 2 on the 1870 census  lived with her dad Manford, older brother Oscar, and grandpa William Speedy; her grandma Fidelia, aunts Juliet, Mary and uncle Edwin Coates. 8 people Speedys and Coates, ranging from 2 years to 80 years old in the home. By 1873 Manford married Elizabeth Stewart and they had children, three sons, three daughters. Annette, at some point moved in with Mary Jane Stewart and her husband Henry Wagonseller Royer in Bristow for a few years. Henry and Mary Jane had 4 sons. While living in Bristow Annette met then married Sherman Grove on August 1, 1889. Henry and Mary Jane were witnesses on Annette’s marriage record. The marriage was in Manford and Elizabeth Stewart Speedy’s home.

Speedy, Annette and Sherman Grove 1889 marriage

“Sherman Grove and Miss Nettie Speedy were married last Thursday at the home of the bride near Allison. The young couple are well known here, Miss Nettie having lived in WW Royer’s family for several years, Sherman having grown from boyhood to manhood here is known to be very industrious, upright young man. They have the best wishes of all who know them.”

Annette and Sherman had eight children, they named their first son Manford. During certain years the State of Iowa had to issue ‘Delayed Birth Records’ because of a mix up in record keeping and those born had to supply proof of birth and a witness. Annette’s brother Harve was a witness on these records, uncle to Annette and Sherman’s kids. In 1903 Annette and family left Bristow for Springbrook, Wisconsin, about 50 miles south of Lake Superior. They settled in Earl, Wisconsin. Then and today the  Wisconsin Great Northern Railroad runs straight through the town https://spoonertrainride.com/

Annette came back to Allison for visits and for her dad’s funeral in 1914.  In 1915 her sisters Eva and Ethel with their husbands took an auto trip to Wisconsin. Annette died September 3, 1935 the Clarksville newspaper carried her obituary. Her sisters Eva and Ethel attended the funeral. Annette and Sherman are buried in Earl Cemetery in Earl, Wisconsin.

Source, Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper
1889 Aug 8 page 5 of 8 column 4 mid way, Annette and Sherman marriage
1903 Mar 12 page column 1 mid bottom, Annette moves to Springbrook WI.
1916 Jul 20 page column 2 mid top, Eva and Ethel visit Annette
1935 Sep 19 page 5 of 8 column 6 mid way