Chauncey Jerome Cable b. 1891

Chauncey Jerome Cable, 1st cousin 1x removed on RootsMagic tree

Chauncey Jerome Cable was born February 7, 1891 in St. Paul, Minnesota, the only child of John and Frances Allen Cable. On September 4, 1891 Chauncey was baptized at Goodrich Avenue Presbyterian Church. This church is still standing, now it’s Pentecostal, Piercing Faith Church.

In 1900 Chauncey lived with his aunts Sarah and Violetta Cable in Chicago. In 1910 Chauncey was a boarder, working at a bank, in Chicago. He visited Greene, Iowa on September 14, 1911 and spent time with his uncle William Cable (dad of Gladys Cable who married Faber Miller). In 1913 he went by Jerome, still in Chicago, he lived at 1400 E 53rd and Dorchester Ave- there’s a subway shop there now, 1 mile west of Lake Shore Drive. Jerome worked at Northern Trust, a bank with a new building in 1905, still in business today.

Cable, Jerome and Lura Horton marriageJerome headed west to Los Angeles, California and married Lura Horton there on June 11, 1919. Lura was a reader, Jerome a stock broker. They had one daughter Jeraldine. In 1927, now Jerry and 37 years old, he worked at Wilcox Drake, a stock exchange, he’s listed as a partner on their advert for a new office in San Francisco.

Stocks

On the 1940 census Jerry was 49, Lura, 43, and Jeraldine a teenager. They live in Los Angeles, Brentwood about 3 miles east of the Pacific ocean and 2 miles southwest of The Getty art museum of today. Also in the home are Arthur and Mary Rhinehert, houseman and housekeeper.

Jerry died in 1973, he was 82 years old. Lura lived 4 more years. They are both buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in LA. Jerry’s obituary shows a private funeral and memorials given to the John Tracy Clinic. The clinic is now the John Tracy Center, still in Los Angeles, founded by Spencer Tracy and wife Louise after their infant son was diagnosed with profound hearing loss.

 

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Clyde Flood b. 1888

Clyde Flood 1st cousin 3x removed on RootsMagic tree

Clyde William Flood was born in South Dakota on March 6, 1888 to George and Lucy Lewis Flood. He had a younger sister Edith, also born in South Dakota, they returned to Butler County, Iowa when the kids were young. In Butler County Clyde and Edith grew up with their cousins Elmer Angell and Philippa Flood Mockford.

Clyde, Edith and Philippa’s grandma Delia Angell Flood was the sister of Elmer’s dad Charles Angell. The Flood and Angell families would have gotten together for picnics and holidays. Clyde and Elmer Angel were close in age, so were Philippa Mockford and Edith Flood.

Snapshots of Clyde and cousins

Clyde grew up on a farm so he would have helped his mom and dad with chores, planting, crops, livestock. At the 1905 Butler County Fair, Clyde won premiums for flowers he raised including a first place for Dahlias. Clyde and Elmer Angell both fought in World War 1. Clyde enlisted in 1917 and served 17 months in the Iowa 95th Aero Squadron, promoted to Corporal . “The squadron was initially formed in early August 1917 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, where 150 civilians were sworn into the United States Army as soldiers. The newly-sworn in men were sent to Kelly Field, Texas, where they arrived on 19 August and were organized as the 95th Aero Squadron.” Elmer died in the Meuse–Argonne battle, in France, 1918.

Flood, Clyde WW1Clyde came home in May, 1919 via the May 7 Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper. “Chas. Thomsen and Clyde Flood arrived here Sunday morning having received their discharge from the army after service over seas.” Though 1920-21 Clyde was active in getting a Butler County post for the American Legion. December 15, 1921 he was elected Sergeant at Arms. September 25, 1924 via the Clarksville (Iowa) Star newspaper, “Iving and Milo Isaacson, Clyde Flood and Dave Kramer drove to St Paul the first of the week where they represented the Allison Post of the American Legion at the National Convention. They returned last week and report having a find trip and a mighty good time at the convention”.

He liked cars too. In November 1934 Clyde bought a brand new Chevrolet Coach. April on 1936 he got a new Chevrolet Carry All Suburban.

Flood, Clyde with a trukeyClyde found work at a turkey farm after he returned from the war. Mr. Nicholas, the farm owner, had a broken electric fan. Nichols was ready to throw it away- Clyde was looking for work, asked to look at the fan ‘from an old battery he got enough material to start’ then fix the fan. Clyde stayed at the turkey farm for 20+ years. In 1944 the Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette had a story about the Nicholas farm and all the birds being shipped overseas for the the World War 2 soldiers Thanksgiving Dinner. Clyde is featured in the story, he was 56 in 1944.

Clyde married Mary ‘Mayme’ Noonan June 27, 1941 in Mason City. They married later in life and didn’t have kids and lived at 420 South Fillmore Avenue there’s a Walgreen’s there now. Clyde died January 25, 1950 at The Des Moines Veteran’s Hospital. Mayme died in 1971. Both are buried Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City, Iowa.

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Catherine Kryder b. 1775

Catherine Kryder 4th great aunt on Roots Magic tree

Catherine was born May 8, 1775 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to John and Anna Maria Fuchs/Fox Kryder. Parents John and Anna both migrated from Germany and married, raised their family in Lancaster, PA, “By 1775, Germans constituted about one-third of the population of the state.” [At Wikipedia with sources.] Catherine was the youngest in the Kryder family. Her older sister Anna Maria married Johann Fryberger and they left for Ohio where their daughter Elizabeth married Henry Miller and their son Peter moved on to Bremer County, Iowa where his son William had a daughter Lola, mom of Faber Miller.

Catherine’s parents and siblings and her husband and children are recorded in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-2014. These are individual index cards, 1000s of cards, typed up to track local family histories. The cards are part of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, still in Lancaster, PA right next door to the Tanger Outlet Center. Mennonites are/were an Anabaptist group committed to peace and pacifism, following the ministry of Jesus. Mennonites were named for Menno Simons of Friesland, Netherlands who was a contemporary of Martin Luther and other Protestant leaders. A person could spend months learning about the history of and current Mennonite religion.

Back in PA, Catherine married Michael Hess in 1795. Catherine and Michael had 11 kids, 9 stayed in Pennsylvania, son Benjamin left for Kansas, daughter Anna left for Illinois. Michael was a soldier in the American Revolution. The only record, so far, of his service is a veteran’s burial index. One of his soldier benefits may have been the chance to buy land. In 1818 Michael bought 100 acres of unimproved land from the US gov’t at 10 pounds per acre. Michael and Catherine with their family and, probably, helpful neighbors would have turned this unimproved land into a homestead and farm, with their hands and tools, machinery of the 1800s. They would have built up a house, barns, fences, water wells, chairs, beds and hundreds of other things.

Catherine and Michael’s family are connected through marriage with other Miller relatives: Bair, Druckenbrod and Harter- families that started in Pennsylvania, moved on to Ohio, then on to Iowa. Catherine and Michael are buried at Stover Cemetery in Aaronsburg, Pennsylvania, an older country cemetery.

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Deborah Angell b. 1639

Deborah Angell 8th great aunt on RootsMagic tree.

Deborah was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1639. Her dad Thomas Angell and mom Alice Ashton were ‘banished’ from Massachusetts and left for Rhode Island with Roger Williams then in 1636 founded Providence, RI. The census of 1636 shows 10 families, 25 households in Providence. Elizabeth Speedy and her ancestors are related to 4 of those 10 families: Angell, Arnold, Smith and Williams.

Angell, Deborah marriageDeborah Angell married Stephen Sabeere on November 7, 1668. Deborah and Stephen lived in Providence all their lives and had at least 3 children. Deborah Sabeere is in her mom and dad’s wills. Her dad leaves her shillings, her mom leaves her clothing, woolens and linens, a chamber pot and some wooden trays.

Angell, Thomas and Alice wills

Just like us in modern times, our ancestors argued, disagreed, fought then compromised, made-up and worked together for the good of the cause. In November of 1672 Stephen Sabeere and neighbor Henry Palmer traded insults: Stephen Sebeere called Henry Palmer’s wife a witch, Henry called Stephen a French dog and rouge. Both men were in court on November 19, 1672 and each had to acknowledge their error in judgment.

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John Howard Montgomery b. 1887

John Howard Montgomery 1st cousin 4x removed on RootsMagic tree

John was born December 3, 1887 in Minneapolis. He was the son of Anson and Bertha Wait Montgomery. Howard, John’s middle name, was his paternal grandma’s maiden name. John, his parents and brother Tracy Wait Montgomery lived in Minneapolis where Anson was a printer,  then by 1910 they were in Butterfield, Missouri. John graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Education and French language. In 1913, 1924, 1927, 1929 and 1932 he sailed to France for the summer. In 1918 he started his teaching career at Mercersburg Academy a private school in Pennsylvania, it’s still there. He taught French and was head of the French department when he retired after 40 years and moved to Madrid, Spain.

1939 yearbook photo with autograph

J. H. Montgomery 1939 yearbook photo with his autograph

He lived in Spain for a couple years then died June 17, 1960, he was 72 and had heart disease and maybe lung disease. The Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, 1835-1974, a record at Ancestry is a sixteen page document verifying his death and burial and listing his possessions. His inventory included a pocket watch, a pocket knife, an Olivetti “22” portable typewriter, a Philips radio-record player and a family photo.

John is buried in Madrid at Saint Isidore Cemetery, Cementerio de la Sacramental de Santa Maria, Patio de la Concepcion, Section 8, row 4, No. 10 is written on his death record. The cemetery has an incredible history and is “one of Europe’s most interesting graveyards”. The lion photo is one of thousands of headstones or sculptures at the cemetery.

Lion, Saint Isidore Cemetery, Google Maps

Lion, Saint Isidore Cemetery, Google Maps, photo by Horacio Montana San Roman, image capture: May 2019

Sources

  • New York, Passenger and Crew Lists 1820-1957
  • Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, 1835-1974 at Ancestry
  • U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 at Ancestry
  • United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925 at FamilySearch
  • United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 at FamilySearch
  • Saint Isidore Cemetery at Wikipedia
  • Sacramental Cemetery of San Isidro in Madrid 
  • Photo of lion  at Saint Isidore Cemetery Google Maps, photo by Horacio Montana San Roman, image capture: May 2019

 

Mattie Frerichs b. 1911

Mattie Frerichs 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree.

Mattie Frerichs was born November 4, 1911 in Butler County, Iowa. She was the youngest Enno and Annie Henrichs Frerichs’s 10 children, their births spanned 20 years from 1891 to 1911. On the Butler County, Iowa 1920 census Mattie was 9 years old and living with her parents and siblings: Sena (Cazina), Martena, Etta, John and Enno Jr. Mattie’s older brother George and sisters Mary, Kate and Flora were married with children and Mattie was an aunt to at least 3 nieces and nephews including Stanley b. 1915, son of Mary Frerichs and George Roose.

Frerichs, Mattie and Hilko Janssen 1936 marriage (1)

After high school Mattie graduated from Iowa Teachers College and taught in rural Iowa schools. On November 25, 1936 she married Hilko Janssen at the Lutheran church in Clarksville, Iowa. Mattie’s sister Sena and husband Hubert Ressler were attendants at the wedding.

Mattie and Hilko farmed and had 3 children. They celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary November 23 1961 at St James Lutheran Church in Allison, Iowa with a program presented by their nieces and nephews and a reception.

Mattie died on January 30 1984 at age 72. She and Hilko are both buried at Allison Cemetery. Hilko lived another 13 years, he died in 1997. In July 1995 he was in the Clarksville Star newspaper remembering the annual Butler County Fair. In 1995 Hilko was attending the fair for the 80th year in a row and remembered his first fair in 1916 when he walked a mile to the fairgrounds and bought an ice cream cone for 10 cents.

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Elizabeth Bulkeley b. 1637

Elizabeth Bulkeley first cousin 10x removed on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth Bulkeley was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1637. Her grandpa Reverend Peter Bulkeley, migrated from England and founded Concord, Massachusetts in 1635. Peter was the first pastor of First Parish Church in Concord, Edward, Elizabeth’s dad was the 3rd pastor and Elizabeth married a pastor, Joseph Emerson. Elizabeth and Joseph had 6 kids. Their son Edward Emerson married Rebecca Waldo, their great grandson was Ralph Waldo Emerson. Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote a poem mentioning his 5th great grandpa Peter Bulkeley, Hamatreya, a couple lines, “Bulkeley, Hunt, Willard, Each of these landlords walked amidst his farm. Saying, T’is mine, my children’s and my name’s. Where are these men? Asleep beneath their grounds.  Earth laughs in flowers, to see her boastful boys. Mine and yours; Mine, not yours. Earth endures Stars abide -.”

Bulkeley, Elizabeth headstone

Elizabeth Browne headstone via Lucius Beebe Memorial Library Digital Heritage collection

When Joseph Emerson died in 1680, widow Elizabeth married John Browne. Elizabeth died in 1693, her 2nd husband John Browne died in 1717. They are both buried at Old Burying Ground in Wakefield, Massachusetts. A sign posted there, “The gravestones in this semi-circle were originally located in the town’s first Burying Ground, near the present site of the Bandstand. These stones represent some of the oldest expressions of Puritan gravestone art in New England”. Elizabeth’s headstone is art, hand made and created. Inscription: Memento Mori “remember you will die” Fugue Hora “the hour flees” Here lyes ye body of Mrs. Elizabeth Browne wife to Cap’n John Brown Esq and former wife of ye Reverend Mr Joseph Emerson of Mendon who deceased Septemb’r ye 4th 1693 in ye 56 year of her age.

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Henry Angell b. 1807

Henry Angell 5th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Henry was born December 16, 1807 in Chenango, New York, that’s central New York, farm country. Henry was the 5th of 7 kids of Asa and Cynthia Hill Angell. On the 1850 census Henry was living in New Berlin, Chenango, NY with his wife Mary Ambrosia Jeffords. Henry was a farmer, he and Mary had 8 kids, maybe 10. In October of 1854 Henry and brother Lewis were named executors in their older brother Dexter Angell’s will and guardians for Dexter’s 2 young children: Delia- Elizabeth Speedy’s great grandma- and Julius Angell.

1860 agricultural censusThe 1860 agricultural census records Henry’s farm production. His farm was valued at $9000 and produced hay, oats, wool, butter beeswax and honey. Brother Lewis Angell’s farm was recorded too, similar to Henry’s with no honey or beeswax, a little less wool and 8000 pounds of cheese produced.

Henry died of consumption (now tuberculosis, then a leading cause of death) on January 15, 1869 he was 61 years old. He wrote his will December 8, 1866. “I Henry H Angell of this town of New Berlin … do hereby make and publish this my last will and testament. I give and devise unto my wife Mary Ambrosia Angell my home farm on which I now reside containing about one hundred acres and to her heirs forever. I give and devise all the rest residue and remainder of my real estate and I bequeath all my personal estate to my children … share and share alike.”

Henry is buried in Scribner Cemetery in New Berlin, NY. More than 30 Angells are buried at this cemetery including Henry’s parents Asa and Cynthia, and Henry’s siblings, Dexter, Lewis, Adelaide and Betsy Angell.

Sources

  • Henry’s will, Chenango Wills, Vol N-O, 1866-1869 page 515 image 619 of 642 at Ancestry
  • Photo of Henry, Public Ancestry photo “shared by klm927”
  • U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885 at Ancestry
  • Snapshots of farm production, U.S., Selected Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880 at Ancestry.
  • Find a grave memorial https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/50602911

Edward Bulkeley b. 1614

Edward Bulkeley 8th great uncle on RootsMagic tree

Edward was born June 17, 1614 in Odell, England to Peter and Jane Allen Bulkeley, the oldest child of 9. Edward’s dad Peter was a Puritan pastor in Odell and was harassed by Archbishop Laud, so looking to leave England. The Buckeleys sailed to America in 1634 or 1635, secretly, “No doubt the long drawn out enrollments and lack of effort to standardize spelling of the names were reflections of the family’s attempt to board the ship without being apprehended. Son Edward preceded the rest of the family, becoming a member of Boston church on 22 March 1634/5”. Archbishop Laud’s story didn’t end well, He was sent to the Tower of London, then executed in 1645. King Charles would regret putting ’too much trust in Laud’.

Bulkeley, Edward house 1967Once they were in America the Bulkeleys lived in Concord where Edward was a freeman on May 6 1635. He married Lucien, last name unknown, in 1640 and they had 6 children. Around 1660 Edward built a house in Concord, on Main Street. “А deed referring to the property, with a dwelling on it, records the 1663 transfer of 10 acres of land located on today’s Main Street to Edward Bulkeley by his mother, widow of one of Concord’s founders and its first minister, Peter Bulkeley.” Today this home is at 92 Sudbury Road in Concord, a private residence, the house was moved in the 1800s. Edward died in 1696, his wife Lucien died in 1690. They are both probably buried at Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, no headstones remain.

Edward, like his dad, was a Puritan pastor and was known for his ‘fiery’ sermons. When his dad died, Edward followed as pastor of the First Parish Church in Concord. This church is also still there in Concord, Massachusetts, now a Unitarian Universalist church. Each Sunday the congregation ends their service with this benediction:

Go out into the world in peace

Have courage

Hold on to what is good

Return to no person evil for evil

Strengthen the fainthearted

Support the weak

Help the suffering

Honor all beings

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Tena Henrichs b. 1880

Tena Henrichs 2nd great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Tena or Trientje was born October 1, 1880 in Germany. At 5 years old she and her family sailed from Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, from Baltimore they traveled to Butler County, Iowa. Tena grew up in Butler County, the 2nd youngest of 5 daughters and 4 sons of Hinrich and Maria Rodenbeck Henrichs.

On February 20, 1907 Tena married John Jacobs. John also migrated from Germany with his parents and 8 siblings. Tena’s brother Fred and sister Mattie were witnesses to the marriage and included on the marriage record. Tena and John lived in Jefferson Township, Butler County Iowa, in a community of German immigrants, farmers, Lutherans. Tena and John had a daughter who died very young and 3 sons: Henry, Jacob and John. Tena’s husband John died December 16, 1916, in an automobile accident. There are no records on how or where Tena and her three young sons lived, whether they stayed on their farm or moved in with relatives.

Soldiers of the 34th Infantry DivisionMeanwhile John Jacobs’s younger bother William had enlisted in the army for World War 1. He was a private in the Minnesota 34th Engineers, with men from Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska. They trained at Camp Cody, New Mexico and were in the war until the 1920s. Marvin Cone, Iowa artist and friend of Grant Wood was in this same unit and designed the insignia. William returned from World War 1 in 1920 and Tena and William married at Ebenezer Lutheran Church on February 22, 1920.

Each of Tena’s 3 sons married, had children and farmed in the Butler County area. Oldest son Henry married Alma Constein at Vilmar Church on February 18, 1936. Tena died May 9, 1959. She was 79 years old and is buried at Butler Center Cemetery with the Jacobs and Henrichs families.

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