Hannah Littlefield b. 1633

Hannah Littlefield 9th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Hannah was baptized on August 10, 1633 with her twin, Thomas at St Peters Church Titchfield. This church was built beginning in the 7th century, with updates and additions it still stands and has an amazing history involving monks, Henry the 8th, Victorian disapproval and more. Photos on google Maps. Hannah, her dad, grandpa and grandma all lived in Titchfield. Hannah’s grandma Mary Littlefield is buried at St Peters. Hannah would barely remember Titchfield, she left for America at 5 years old. Her dad and a brother sailed earlier, then Hannah, her mom. siblings and two servants, maybe one a tutor sailed on the Bevis in 1638. The Littlefields were in Boston, then left for Wells, Maine where they were among the first settlers on the Webhannet River.

At age 29 Hannah married Peter Cloyes. Hannah and Peter stayed in Salem, they probably had 10 children. Hannah had died by 1683 when Peter married Sarah Towne, also a widow.

Hannah was named in her mom and dad’s wills. Her dad Edmund leaves her 15 pounds, her mom Annis leaves Hannah a bed and bolster, woolens and linens and Annis leaves son in law Peter acres of land.

Sources

Martha Bulkeley b. 1572

Martha Bulkeley 11th great aunt on RootsMagic tree

Martha was born in Odell, Bedfordshire England in 1572. Her father and then her younger brother Peter were pastors at All Saints Parish in Odell. Martha would have been baptized and married in the church which was built in the 1400s and is still standing. Martha married Abraham Mellows around 1595. In 1630s England, Martha, her husband, her brother Peter and other friends and church members left England for America specifically for religious freedom. The Mellows arrived before 1633 when they were admitted to the First Church of Charlestown, Massachusetts.. “Abraham Mellows and Martha his wife and Edward Mellows their son … were admitted to Charlestown church on August 19 1633.”. The family stayed in Charlestown and Martha and Abraham had at least 8 children. Their son Edward was the first husband of Hannah Smith 9th great grandma.

  • Source
    Charlestown (Mass.). Records of the First church in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1632-1789, Boston Printed for J.F. Hunnewell, by D. Clapp and Son 1880
    http://tinyurl.com/y66jzuk6

 

Annis Austin b. 1596

Annis Austin 10th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Annis was born in Exeter, England on February 1, 1596. In 1614 she married Edmund Littlefield, they were parents of 8 kids. Before 1638 Edmund and an older son sailed for America. In 1638 Annis went to America. She sailed on the Bevis with her younger kids and a couple servants. Annis’s brother Richard Austin with his family and a servant were on this same ship which landed in Boston May of 1638. (Annis’s brother Richard is the 3rd great grandfather of Stephen F. Austin, who founded Texas). Annis Edmund and family stayed in Boston for a short time then moved on to Wells, Maine where Edmund built the first sawmill and gristmill near Webhannet Falls. Annis with her family farmed and cleared the way for other English settlers. “With the aid of his large family, he (Edmund) prepared the way for the habitation of man”.

Annis was a widow in 1661 and wrote her will on December 12, 1677. She mentions each of her children and leaves land, wools, linens and a bed to daughter Hannah and husband Peter Cloyes- 9th great grandparents.

Austin, Annis on the Bevis closeup

Annis and children sailed on the Bevis 1638

Bevis_Passengers_1638

List of passengers 1638 on the Bevis

The history of Wells and Kennebunk from the earliest settlement page 77 

Richard Austin on Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Austin_(colonist)

The ship Bevis on Wikipedia with image of handwritten list
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bevis_(ship)

The Wells, Maine PD has a post on their Facebook page with a photo of the Littlefield marker: The Bridge of Flowers at Webhannet Falls.

John Drake b. 1585

John Drake 12th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree.

John Drake was born in England about 1585. Past research on John Drake connected him to King Henry the 8th, Shakespeare and Sir Francis Drake, but it’s all been proven very unlikely. So John was born in England where he married Elizabeth and they had 5 children. In 1630 the Drakes arrived in America, sailing on the Mary and John. The passengers on this ship are considered the founders of Windsor, Connecticut. They lived in Dorchester first then the whole group moved to Windsor, Connecticut. John was a woodworker, a farmer and was active in town services. He was on several juries and on December 1, 1645 one of the constables in charge of gathering up knapsacks filled with powder and bullets, delivering those knapsacks to a Mr Talcott and keeping a written record of the ‘particulars so delivered’.

John died in an accident. Driving a cart full of corn ‘Something Scard the Cattle and they Set a running, and he Labouring to Stop them, by taking hold on the mare, was thrown’.

He wrote his will in 1659 and mentions each of his children.

John’s burial is unknown but his name is on the Founders of Windsor Monument at Palisado Cemetery in Windsor, Connecticut. The monument reads, “To the founders of Windsor and the First Congregational Church in Connecticut which came to America in the Mary and John with its pastor John Warham May 30, 1630, Settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts and migrated to Windsor in May and October 1635.”Snapshot for the Windsor Historical Society. 3 ancestors of Faber Miller are on the monument: John Drake, Thomas Dewey and Henry Wolcott

Planters of the Commonwealth, Page 87 the Drake family sails to America.

A report of the record commissioners of the city of Boston, Volume 29 page 133 Misc. papers, Oct 19, 1630, a Freeman.

A digest of the early Connecticut probate records, Volume 1 page 111, 112 John Drake’s dated will with wife, children.

The descendants of John Drake of Windsor, Connecticut, after page 2 images of John Drake’s handwritten will.

Windsor Historical Society, the Founder’s Monument
https://windsorhistoricalsociety.org/founders-of-windsor-trades-professions/

Thomas Barnes b. 1602

Thomas Barnes 11th great grandfather on RootsMagic tree

Thomas was born about 1602 in England and was living in Hingham, Massachusetts by 1637 when he and his (probable) brother Peter were on a handwritten list, First Settlers, of Hingham. About 1643 Thomas married Anna her last name is unknown. Thomas was a weaver and farmer. He was a freeman in 1645.

Barnes, Thomas headstone

Thomas Barnes d. 1672

His will was written April 29, 1671. He named his wife and children and his inventory included books, blankets, a cedar chest, yards of cloth, cotton and woolen yarn, 5 painted earthen ware dishes, weaving and farming supplies, livestock, bushels of produce, lots of land.

Thomas died in 1672 and is buried in Hingham Cemetery. The cemetery was founded in 1672 Thomas’s headstone was the first, this is noted on FindAGrave. The headstone is original but doesn’t mark his burial place. It was placed with others in a circle around the Founders Monument. The cemetery is right behind Old Ship Church, the only remaining 17th-century Puritan meeting house in America.


The ancestry of Emily Jane Angell, 1844-1910 page 195 Barnes section

At Ancestry. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 Hingham Records of First Settlers image 2 of 81 Thomas and Peter Barnes 1637 Thomas d. Nov.29 1672

At HathiTrust.

Find a Grave memorial 51474179. Oldest original headstone in the cemetery. Headstone photos “Added by Hammer”

Old Ship Church on Wikipedia

Christiana Peake b. 1584

Christiana Peake 11th great grandmother on RootsMagic tree

Christiana Peake was baptized on Feb 15 1584 in Somerset, England. Her dad was Thomas, her mother and siblings are unknown. Christiana lived in Elizabethan England with the pencil invented, the new idea that the Earth rotated around the Sun, Shakespeare’s plays, the Spanish Armada, religious turmoil and major migrations to New England.

By age 25 she married William Arnold also of Somerset. Their church was St Mary Major in Ilchester where husband William was a church warden. They had 4 children that lived to adulthood and when William’s sister Joanne and her husband William Hopkins died, Christiana and William took in the Hopkins kids and they all sailed to America in 1635. The only record of their trip is son Benedict’s note,”Memorandom my father and his family Sett Sayle from Dartmouth in Old England, the first of May, friday. Arrived In New England June 24 Ano 1635″. Christiana arrived in Massachusetts when she was 48. Her family moved to Rhode Island and were on that list: A family census of Moshassuck and Pawtuxet, for September 1, 1636. The Arnolds moved to Pawtuxet, now Cranston where they were probably the area’s biggest land owners. Both Christiana and her husband lived to their 70s, their burial place is unknown. They probably died in Kent Rhode Island going there to live with their son Stephen to escape King Philips War in Pawtuxet. Christiana lived to see her grandchildren and her children’s successes including son Benedict becoming a governor of Rhode Island.

Benedict’s note. The New England historical and genealogical register 1879 Volume 33 page 427 to 432 (England origins of this article are now considered false. The American information is good.)

Arnolds leaving King Philips War, William Hopkins giving his recollection 16 October 1678 in The early records of the town of Providence, volume 15 page 182.

The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence, Volume 1 page 158 Providence It’s Beginnings. September 1, 1636 census or list of residents.

Ephraim Child b. 1593

Ephraim 11th great uncle on RootsMagic tree.
Ephraim was born in 1593 in Nayland, Suffolk, England. At age 13 he was a tailor apprentice. Snap shot shows A Register of the Scholars Admitted Into Merchant Taylor’s School, Volume 1 page 50, list 1605 at HathiTrust.

screenshot.png

On February 8, 1624 at age 31 he married Elizabeth Bond, a widow, hey didn’t have children and lived in Nayland, England until 1630 when they sailed for America with the Winthrop Fleet, on Wikipedia. “The Winthrop Fleet was a well-planned and financed expedition that formed the nucleus of the Massachusetts Bay Colony”. Letters of Ephraim and John Winthrop survive in the volumes of Winthrop Journals.
Pages 165-168 Ephraim’s letters to John Winthrop.

Ephraim and the 700 other passengers of the fleet landed in Salem. Ephraim went to Watertown where he was a freeman in 18 May 1631. He was actively involved in the new colony as a commissioner to end small causes, keeper of the town books, auditor and selectmen. He held selectmen meetings at his home. He owned lots of lands: uplands, marsh, lowland, Remote Meadow, Hither Plain, Great Dividend and more.

His will was dated 20 November 1662, proved 2 April 1663. He left lands, money and possessions to his widow and his Bond and Child nephews. To the Watertowne schoolmaster he left 40 shillings annually. His inventory was dated 12 February 1662. The inventory included all his lands, livestock, farm buildings, tools, wearing apparel, 2 silver cups, 12 silver spoons and a lot more.


Volume 1 page 50. A register of the scholars admitted into Merchant Taylor’s School, from A.D. 1562 to 1874, list 1605 Oct. Ephraim Child s. of Wolston cit. and cordwayner, decd., b. Feb 1596. Merchant Taylors School on Wikipedia- it’s like Hogworts with houses and colors- opened in 1551, and is still a private day school in a different location from when Ephraim was a student.

Volume 1 fifth series page 165. Winthrop, Adam. The Winthrop Papers Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1871