Andrew Crooks b. 1773

Andrew Crooks 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree.

Andrew was born in Maryland in 1773 and grew up in Harford County, about 50 miles northeast of Baltimore. A 1776 colonial census shows Andrew 3 years old, with his dad Henry, mom Jane Howlett, older brother William, younger sister Margaret and Elizabeth Kerby who could have been a relative, nanny or servant. In Harford County, Broadcreek Hundred in the population of 342 there was one Crooks family and a couple Howlett families.

Crooks family 1776 US census

Around 1795 Andrew married Elizabeth Jeffrey from Pennsylvania. Andrew and she had 7 kids. Elizabeth died in 1818 at age 39. Andrew then married Margaret Allen, they had 4 kids. Andrew was a farmer, his sons helped him farm.

Andrew wrote his will on January 8, 1849 and died on January 8, 1849. In the will Andrew provides for his widow and all children with lands or money. Each daughter received $100 including Elizabeth who was living in French Creek, PA and married to William Stewart. By 1860 Elizabeth and William were in Wisconsin, the in 1870 lived in Shell Rock, Iowa where their youngest daughter Elizabeth married Manford Speedy in 1873. Daughter Elizabeth Crooks Stewart was the only child of Andrew to make it to Iowa. Youngest son Andrew went to Missouri, all other kids stayed in Pennsylvania.

Sources

Andrew Malone b. 1775

Andrew Malone 5th great grandpa on RoostMagic tree

Andrew Malone was born about 1775 in Pennsylvania. He married Mary around 1795. Mary’s last name and parents are unknown. Andrew and Mary on the 1820 US census lived in Washington Township, Franklin County, PA about 40 miles northwest of Baltimore  They lived in Franklin County until 1828 or 1829 when the family moved west. Andrew and Mary were in their 50s, their kids were in their 20s, 30s. Maybe a son or daughter in law joined the trip. If they drove their horse and wagon 10 miles every day the 258 mile journey would have taken about 35 days.

Families moving west in the 1800s is sometimes presented as sunshine and roses but it wasn’t quite that. Once they arrived at their new home:

“earlier settlers … were confronted with two sets of problems: the one concerned with shelter, food, health, and protection – things vital and immediate … the other with ownership of land, transportation, and currency – things necessary for his economic advancement … Without the successful solution to the first, there was little need to worry about the second”

The Malone family, when they got to Stark County, Ohio, joined an already established  community of German Americans  farmers from Pennsylvania. Their neighbors in Ohio may have been their same neighbors in Pennsylvania: Bair, Fryberger, Harter and Miller families. The community stepped up, pitched in, helped out to make the move easier for the new arrivals.

Andrew and Mary’s children married and had families in Stark. Their daughter Margaret married George Bair, grandparents of Fianna Druckenbrod who with her husband William Miller moved further west to  Bremer County Iowa. Fianna Druckenbrod Miller would return to Stark County, Ohio for annual family reunions.

Malone, 1850 Ohio

1850 US census Stark, Ohio

Mary Malone died in November, 1845. The 1850 US census shows Andrew lived with daughter Margaret, her husband George Bair and their young family. Every person on the census page is born in Germany, Pennsylvania or Ohio. Most are farmers, with  a blacksmith, carpenter and a couple laborers. Andrew died later that year.

Sources

Elizabeth Frances Green b. 1809

Elizabeth Green 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Elizabeth Frances Green was born in 1809 or 10 in Seaford, Sussex, England. A church, parish register shows her baptism on April 1, 1810. The handwritten record is viewable only at FamilySearch, it’s copyrighted, text reads, ” Elizabeth Frances Green, baptized 1 Apr 1810 Seaford, Sussex, England, parents Stephen Green and Mary”. Elizabeth was the 5th of 7 kids of Stephen and Mary Hoad Green. On February 13, 1830, the day before Valentine’s Day, Elizabeth married Richard Mockford of nearby Brighton, Sussex, England. In 1830 Valentine’s Day was already a thing based on Saint Valentine, a 3rd century saint.

In 1851and 1861 Elizabeth and family were on the England censuses living on the southwestern edge of England in Budock, Cornwall, England. Elizabeth and Richard had 8 kids: 4 sons and 4 daughters. Richard was a ‘Miller, Foreman’ an advanced skill and his oldest son Henry a ‘Miller, Journeyman’ an apprenticed skill.

All of the Mockford family moved to America, not all together but over a few years. Their son Henry migrated in 1854, their son William in 1859. Elizabeth and Richard followed and by 1863 were living in the Brockport, Rochester New York area. Richard started a flour business, his sons Henry and William followed in this business. Elizabeth would have managed the home and probably was famous for making bread with fresh milled four from her family’s store.

All of the Mockford kids married and when Richard died in 1867 he and Elizabeth had at least 8 grandkids. As a widow, on the 1870 census Elizabeth was the head of house and her youngest son Edward and 2 daughters Clarissa and Emily lived with her. Clarissa was a dressmaker, Emily a milliner and Edward worked in a furnace, maybe a pottery furnace or an industrial furnace, not sure. On the 1880 US census was living with Edward, his wife Adella and their kids in Batavia, New York. Elizabeth died on June 28, 1889 and was living with he daughter Clarissa and family.

Sources

  • England Sussex parish registers 1538-1910 database copyrighted image FamilySearch
  • This could have been her view growing up in Seaford, Sussex via Google Maps https://goo.gl/maps/xQ8mY2zECawZDcoF8
  • England and Wales Census, 1851 at FamilySearch
  • 1870 United States Federal Census at Ancestry

John Fryberger b. 1767

John Fryberger 5th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in 1767 in Pennsylvania to Ludwig and Anna Betty Fryberger. John was probably confirmed in Bern Church on October 22, 1786. The 1790 census in Berks County, PA shows John’s mom Widow Fryberger, John’s brother Jacob Fryberger as John’s neighbors. The widow has 3 children in her home. Jacob has a spouse and 4 kids, John is still single. John married Anna Maria Kryder on July 11, 1795 in Pennsylvania. John and Anna had at least 8 children. By 1820 the family had followed hundreds of other German Americans from Pennsylvania farm country to Ohio. The 1820 and 1830 censuses show John and family living in Stark County, Ohio. John and his sons were farmers, landowners. In 1814 John’s daughter Elizabeth married Henry Miller, their son Peter would move to Bremer County Iowa and have a son William whose daughter Lola married another William Miler they were parents of Faber Miller.

John lived to age 78, he died in 1845. He was buried in Maplegrove Mennonite Cemetery in Hartville, Stark County, Ohio. The cemetery no longer exists, “the cemetery was removed, at least 20 years ago, when an addition and parking lot were added to the church.” This is written, no date at John’s Find a Grave memorial. John’s wife and daughter Elizabeth Fryberger Miller are also buried there.

Long after John was gone his grandson John was in The farm journal rural directory of Stark County, Ohio, published in 1915. Photos in the directory show how ancestor farm families lived at the time. And directly above John Fryberger entry is Zenas Fry, another farmer in the area, originally from Pennsylvania. Zenas married Mandana Miller, she was the granddaughter of Henry and his wife Elizabeth Fryberger Miller.

Sources

  • 1790 United States census database at FamilySearch
  • Pennsylvania, Church Records – Adams, Berks, and Lancaster Counties, 1729-1881 at Ancestry
  • Pennsylvania, Septennial Census, 1779-1863 at Ancestry
  • The farm journal rural directory of Stark County, Ohio at Archive.org

John Johns and Philippa b. 1800

John Johns and Philippa 4th great grandparents on RootsMagic Tree

John was born around 1800 in Mylor Cornwall England. He married Philippa, last name unknown, around 1820. John and Philippa stayed in the Mylor area and had 7 kids: 5 daughters and 2 sons. Their children were baptized in the local church from 1827 to 1840. John was a gardener, Philippa would have managed the house.

Johns, John 1851 England census

John died then was buried on September 25, 1856 he was 55. John may have known about his grandson Richard Mockford born on September 21, 1856 but probably not, news traveled way slower in 1856. John’s grandson Richard Mockford left NY for Iowa where he married Matilda Flood and they named their daughter Philippa after Richard’s mom and grandma. Great granddaughter and the 3rd Philippa married Harve Speedy, their first child was Elizabeth Speedy.

New York 1856John and Philippa Johns in Cornwall did live to see their daughter Philippa marry Henry Mockford in July of 1853 then sail to New York in November 1855. John and Philippa probably had a postcard in the mail, from daughter Philippa Johns Mockford in America, showing the Statue of Liberty.

Sources

John Kryder b. 1736

John Kryder 6th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

John or Johann was born in France, Germany or Pennsylvania on or around April 22, 1736, sources vary. By 1767 he was definitely in Pennsylvania where he married Ann Maria Fuchs or Fox. John and Ann had at least 5 children born between 1768 and 1775 in the area of Lancaster, PA.

John and family were part of the German American Pennsylvania community. During the American Revolution they were in the Big Runaway of 1778: “The Big Runaway was a mass evacuation in June and July 1778 of settlers from the frontier areas of what is now north central Pennsylvania during the American Revolutionary War.” The locals knew of the dangers because of the war, had requested aid: rifles, armed men from the Continental Congress, none of it arrived in time. So everyone fled with livestock and whatever possessions they could carry. Books and movies could be made about this one event, it’s huge and lasted through 1779 when the American gov’t committed more aid to “security of the frontier”.

Kryder John bacon and beef soldJohn sold bacon and beef to the Continental Army during the American Revolution. His neighbor George Marquart had the mutton and Jacob Yeiser provided the brandy. At some point John fought in the American Revolution. There’s no military records yet, but his headstones recognize his service in the American Revolution and the French Indian Wars. John has a headstone probably original from his death in 1803 and then a newer marker which his descendants set out out in 1994.

Sources

Margaret Malone b. 1818

Margaret Malone 4th great grandma on RootsMagic tree

Margaret was born in Pennsylvania on June 30, 1818, the daughter of Andrew and Mary Malone. By 1830 the Malone family was in Stark County, Ohio. On the 1830 US census Margaret’s family shows a total of 6 people. Before 1850 only men’s names were recorded, women and children in the home were tick marks. The 1830 census has Andrew and Mary Malone with 4 kids, a son 20-29, Margret and another daughter 10-14 and a daughter 15-19. No names or information for any of Margaret’s siblings yet.

In Ohio on March 24, 1836 Margaret married George Bair. George’s family was also from Pennsylvania and moved to Ohio in 1805. Ohio’s population was 45,000 in 1800 then 1.4 million in 1840 with lots of German Americans coming to Ohio from PA. Margaret and George Bair had 5 kids: 4 daughters and a son. Their oldest child Elizabeth Harter Bair married Samuel Druckenbrod whose daughter Fiana Druckenbrod lived with her grandparents for at least one year. Fianna married William Miller in Ohio and they moved to Bremer County, Iowa where their daughter Lola married another William Miller and had a son Faber Miller.

Bairs, Malone, Millers, Kryders in Plain Ohio.

Margaret and George, their neighbors the Bairs, Kryders, Millers

Margaret and George farmed. An 1870 atlas of Stark County show Margaret and George’s land, surrounded by relatives all around. Close neighbors left to right: J and WL Miller, JM Kryder, Franklin Bair, JH Bair, JS Miller and George Bair and Margaret’s land at bottom right.

George and Margaret are both buried at Saint Jacobs Lutheran Cemetery, in Stark County. They share a headstone. Margaret died in 1894, 2 years after her husband.

Sources

Thomas Glenn b. 1766

Thomas Glenn 4th great grandpa on RootsMagic tree

Thomas Glenn was born on March 4, 1766 in Pennsylvania. His parents were probably Thomas and Elizabeth, newly discovered ancestors, maybe from Coleraine, County Londonderry, Ireland, not a lot of facts and records yet.

Thomas Glenn married Jane Bromfield on May 12, 1789 in Cumberland, PA at the Presbyterian church. Presbyterians trace their origin to Britain, mostly Scotland. Thomas and Nancy probably had 10-12 children and farmed in Island Creek, Jefferson County, Ohio, eastern Ohio, near the Ohio River. Thomas fought in the War of 1812, a major in Andrews Regiment, Ohio Militia. He paid taxes in Island Creek, real and personal estate, with tax records from 1816 to 1838. There was a cholera epidemic in Ohio that began in 1830. Both Thomas and his daughter Elizabeth died of cholera. Thomas was 82, Elizabeth was 55.
The 1850 US census mortality schedule database proving Thomas and Elizabeth’s deaths is little morbid but packed with family history information and at the bottom, a note of about the crops, land soil and cholera in the area. “The above township is well adapted to raising wheat crop, oats and indeed almost kind of product common to this country. The land is rolling but little broken rich and fertile soil mostly limestone. Wheat and apple crop … in 1849 of the farmers … our third crops better … the cholera carried off many of the citizens in 1849” Some of the note is unreadable.

Glenn, Thomas and Elizabeth 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas Glenn and daughter Elizabeth Speedy 1850 mortality schedule

Thomas is buried at Island Creek Cemetery in Toronto, Jefferson County, Ohio, in the “Pioneer Section”. Wife Nancy and daughter Elizabeth Glenn Speedy are in the same cemetery. Elizabeth Glenn married William Speedy and their son Manford with his uncle Alexander Glenn was in Iowa by 1856. William Speedy joined them in Iowa by 1870.
Sources

Catherine Kryder b. 1775

Catherine Kryder 4th great aunt on Roots Magic tree

Catherine was born May 8, 1775 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to John and Anna Maria Fuchs/Fox Kryder. Parents John and Anna both migrated from Germany and married, raised their family in Lancaster, PA, “By 1775, Germans constituted about one-third of the population of the state.” [At Wikipedia with sources.] Catherine was the youngest in the Kryder family. Her older sister Anna Maria married Johann Fryberger and they left for Ohio where their daughter Elizabeth married Henry Miller and their son Peter moved on to Bremer County, Iowa where his son William had a daughter Lola, mom of Faber Miller.

Catherine’s parents and siblings and her husband and children are recorded in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-2014. These are individual index cards, 1000s of cards, typed up to track local family histories. The cards are part of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, still in Lancaster, PA right next door to the Tanger Outlet Center. Mennonites are/were an Anabaptist group committed to peace and pacifism, following the ministry of Jesus. Mennonites were named for Menno Simons of Friesland, Netherlands who was a contemporary of Martin Luther and other Protestant leaders. A person could spend months learning about the history of and current Mennonite religion.

Back in PA, Catherine married Michael Hess in 1795. Catherine and Michael had 11 kids, 9 stayed in Pennsylvania, son Benjamin left for Kansas, daughter Anna left for Illinois. Michael was a soldier in the American Revolution. The only record, so far, of his service is a veteran’s burial index. One of his soldier benefits may have been the chance to buy land. In 1818 Michael bought 100 acres of unimproved land from the US gov’t at 10 pounds per acre. Michael and Catherine with their family and, probably, helpful neighbors would have turned this unimproved land into a homestead and farm, with their hands and tools, machinery of the 1800s. They would have built up a house, barns, fences, water wells, chairs, beds and hundreds of other things.

Catherine and Michael’s family are connected through marriage with other Miller relatives: Bair, Druckenbrod and Harter- families that started in Pennsylvania, moved on to Ohio, then on to Iowa. Catherine and Michael are buried at Stover Cemetery in Aaronsburg, Pennsylvania, an older country cemetery.

Sources

Deborah Angell b. 1639

Deborah Angell 8th great aunt on RootsMagic tree.

Deborah was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1639. Her dad Thomas Angell and mom Alice Ashton were ‘banished’ from Massachusetts and left for Rhode Island with Roger Williams then in 1636 founded Providence, RI. The census of 1636 shows 10 families, 25 households in Providence. Elizabeth Speedy and her ancestors are related to 4 of those 10 families: Angell, Arnold, Smith and Williams.

Angell, Deborah marriageDeborah Angell married Stephen Sabeere on November 7, 1668. Deborah and Stephen lived in Providence all their lives and had at least 3 children. Deborah Sabeere is in her mom and dad’s wills. Her dad leaves her shillings, her mom leaves her clothing, woolens and linens, a chamber pot and some wooden trays.

Angell, Thomas and Alice wills

Just like us in modern times, our ancestors argued, disagreed, fought then compromised, made-up and worked together for the good of the cause. In November of 1672 Stephen Sabeere and neighbor Henry Palmer traded insults: Stephen Sebeere called Henry Palmer’s wife a witch, Henry called Stephen a French dog and rouge. Both men were in court on November 19, 1672 and each had to acknowledge their error in judgment.

Sources